More US adults and kids are doing yoga, meditating

If you can do a downward-facing dog, you’re among the increasing numbers of Americans doing yoga.

A new report says more adults — and even kids — are practicing yoga and meditation.

A government survey conducted last year found 14 percent of adults said they had recently done yoga, and the same percentage had recently meditated. That’s up from about 10 percent and 4 percent from a similar survey done five years earlier.

For kids ages 4 through 17, about 8 percent had recently done yoga, up from 3 percent. For meditation, it was about 6 percent, similar to the earlier survey.

Experts say yoga, meditation and some other forms of complementary medicine have been increasingly promoted as ways to reduce stress and anxiety and improve health.

 

November 08, 2018

Sources: NBC

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    1 March 22, 2019
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    ve come true, I nearly lost my mind and then my life. 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    1 March 22, 2019
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    1 March 22, 2019
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    1 March 22, 2019
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    1 March 22, 2019
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    expose their children to the virus so they would get sick, recover and build up immunity to the disease. Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin stirred up controversy this week when he told a radio show host that he exposed all nine of his children to a neighbor who was sick with the virus.</p><p>“Every single one of my kids got the chickenpox. They got the chickenpox on purpose,” Bevin said in an interview with WKCT, a talk radio station in Bowling Green, Kentucky. “We found a neighbor that had it, and I went and made sure every one of them got it. They were miserable for a few days and they all turned out fine.”</p><p>Most doctors believe that deliberately infecting a child with the full-blown virus is a bad idea. While chickenpox is mild for most children, it can be a dangerous virus for others — and there's no way to know which child will have a serious case, experts say.</p><p>“I don’t know why you would expose your child to something that could potentially have serious complications,” said Dr. Candice Dye, a pediatrician and associate professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “When you get the vaccine your body is given a protective dose, which allows your body to make antigens so you don’t get the full-blown experience.”</p><p>During the radio interview, Bevin told the host, “If you are worried yourself, if you’re an adult, or if you are worried about your child contracting something like chickenpox, then vaccinate your child. Don’t worry about what someone else is doing.”</p><p>“Those who are directly exposed can infect others up to three weeks afterwards. You're potentially exposing those who haven't been vaccinated and high risk patients like those who are immunocompromised, such as cancer patients or people on steroids, and women who are pregnant,” said Dr. Bessey Geevarghese, a pediatric infectious disease expert at Lurie Children’s at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital. “Getting the vaccine is just a better way than exposing everyone to chicken pox.”</p><p>The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention does not endorse any natural immunity method.</p><p>“When your child gets the chickenpox shots, he or she is getting immunity from chickenpox without the risk of serious complications of the disease,” a CDC spokesman said.</p><p>The chickenpox vaccine uses a weakened version of the virus to build up the person's immunity to the actual virus, resulting in a milder and shorter course of the disease. Without the vaccine, symptoms usually last five to seven days.</p><p>Most children experience symptoms such as an itchy rash, fever, headache and fatigue, but more serious, albeit rare problems like skin infections, dehydration, pneumonia and a dangerous swelling of the brain called encephalitis, can occur.</p><p>For unvaccinated children over the age of 13 who have never had the chickenpox, it is recommended that they receive two doses of the vaccine at least 28 days apart.</p><p>Dr. Shamard Charles is a physician-journalist for NBC News and Today, reporting on health policy, public health initiatives, diversity in medicine, and new developments in health care research and medical treatments. </p>

    1 March 22, 2019
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    ritten, or redistributed. ©2019 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes. </p><p>A cough syrup for babies is being recalled because it could be contaminated with a bacteria that can cause vomiting or diarrhea, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).</p><p>Bacillus cereus can cause two kinds of gastrointestinal illness. According to the notice, the illnesses tend to be mild, but there have been more serious and even lethal cases. Infants, young children and those with weakened immune systems are at risk for more hazardous forms of the illnesses.</p><p>However, there have not yet been any reports of illness in connection with the recalled cough medicine, the notice said.</p><p>Kingston Pharma, LLC produces the cough syrup and is recalling Lot KL180157 of the product. It was sold in 2-fluid ounce (59 mL) bottles and was distributed nationwide in Dollar General stores.</p><p>It comes in a carton labeled: &#x201C;DG&#x2122;/health baby Cough Syrup + Mucus&#x201D; and has an expiration date of 11/20 on the bottom of the carton and the back of the bottle label.</p><p>Audit testing found the bacteria in some of the bottles in the recalled lot. According to the notice, one in 10 bottles showed low levels of Bacillus cereus, the more dangerous bacteria, and two in 10 bottles showed low levels of Bacillus circulans.</p><p>The notice advises anyone who bought the cough syrup from the recalled lot to&#xA0;return it to the retailer where they bought it for a full refund.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2019 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 March 22, 2019
  • Mississippi's new law will ban abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected

    Mississippi's new law will ban abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected

    signed one of the strictest abortion laws in the nation — a measure that bans most abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected, about six weeks into pregnancy.</p><p>The New York-based Center for Reproductive Rights called the measure "cruel and clearly unconstitutional" and said it would sue Mississippi to try to block the law from taking effect on July 1. Bryant's action came despite a federal judge's decision last year striking down a less-restrictive law limiting abortions in the state.</p><p>After a bill signing ceremony at the state Capitol, Bryant told reporters that he's not worried about lawsuits.</p><p>"They don't have to sue us. It's up to them," Bryant said. "If they do not believe in the sanctity of life, these that are in organizations like Planned Parenthood, we will have to fight that fight. But it is worth it."</p><p>Mississippi is one of several states that have considered bills this year to ban abortions once a fetal heartbeat is found. Abortion opponents are emboldened by new conservatives on the Supreme Court and are seeking cases to challenge the court's 1973 ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.</p><p>A federal judge in 2018 struck down a Mississippi law that would ban most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, saying it is unconstitutional.</p><p>"Lawmakers didn't get the message," Hillary Schneller, staff attorney for the Center for Reproductive Rights, said in a statement Thursday. "They are determined to rob Mississippians of the right to abortion, and they are doing it at the expense of women's health and taxpayer money. This ban — just like the 15-week ban the governor signed a year ago — is cruel and clearly unconstitutional."</p><p>The law that Bryant signed Thursday says a physician who performs an abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected could face revocation of his or her Mississippi medical license. It also says abortions could be allowed after a fetal heartbeat is found if a pregnancy endangers a woman's life or one of her major bodily functions. The House and Senate both rejected efforts to allow exceptions for pregnancies caused by rape or incest.</p><p>Georgia and Tennessee are among the states considering similar bills. Kentucky's law banning abortion after the detection of a heartbeat was immediately challenged by the American Civil Liberties Union when Republican Gov. Matt Bevin signed it on March 14, and a federal judge temporarily blocked it. A federal judge on Wednesday also blocked another Kentucky law that would ban abortion for women seeking to end their pregnancies because of the gender, race or disability of the fetus.</p>

    1 March 22, 2019
  • A monkey's birth and the effort preserve fertility of boys with cancer

    A monkey's birth and the effort preserve fertility of boys with cancer

    oung boys undergoing cancer treatment preserve their future fertility — and the proof is the first monkey born from the experimental technology.</p><p>More and more people are surviving childhood cancer, but nearly 1 in 3 will be left infertile from the chemotherapy or radiation that helped save their life.</p><p>When young adults are diagnosed with cancer, they can freeze sperm, eggs or embryos ahead of treatment. But children diagnosed before puberty can't do that because they're not yet producing mature eggs or sperm.</p><p>"Fertility issues for kids with cancer were ignored" for years, said University of Pittsburgh reproductive scientist Kyle Orwig. "Many of us dream of growing up and having our own families. We hope our research will help these young patients to do that."</p><p>Orwig's team reported a key advance Thursday: First, they froze a bit of testicular tissue from a monkey that hadn't yet reached puberty. Later, they used it to produce sperm that, through a monkey version of IVF, led to the birth of a healthy female monkey named Grady.</p><p>The technique worked well enough that human testing should begin in the next few years, Orwig said.</p><p>"It's a huge step forward" that should give hope to families, said Susan Taymans of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, which helped fund the research published in the journal Science. "It's not like science fiction. It's something that seems pretty attainable."</p><p>University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a handful of other hospitals already freeze immature testicular tissue from young cancer patients, in hopes of knowing how to use it once they're grown and ready to have their own children.</p><p>Boys are born with stem cells inside little tubes in the testes, cells that start producing sperm after puberty's testosterone jolt. Orwig's goal: Keep sperm-producing stem cells safe from cancer treatment by freezing small pieces of testicular tissue, and using them to restore fertility later in life.</p><p>Orwig's team froze tissue from young male monkeys, and then sterilized them. Once the monkeys approached puberty, the researchers thawed those tissue samples and gave them back to the original animal — implanting them just under the skin.</p><p>"We're not hooking it up to the normal plumbing," Orwig cautioned.</p><p>Boosted by hormones, the little pieces of tissue grew. Months later, the researchers removed them. Sure enough, inside was sperm they could collect and freeze.</p><p>Colleagues at the Oregon National Primate Research Center injected some of that sperm into eggs from female monkeys and implanted the resulting embryos. Last April, Grady was born, and "she plays and behaves just like every other monkey that was grown the normal way," Orwig said.</p><p>If the technique sounds a little bizarre, it's similar to a female option.</p><p>Girls' eggs are in an immature state before puberty. Researchers have removed and frozen strips of ovarian tissue harboring egg follicles from young women before cancer treatment, in hopes that when transplanted back later the immature eggs would resume development. It's considered experimental even for young adults but some births have been reported. Now some hospitals bank ovarian tissue from girls, too.</p><p>Surgery involving the boys' testicular tissue is less invasive, noted Orwig, who also is researching ways to reinsert sperm-producing stem cells where they belong rather than the more roundabout technique.</p><p>The new research shows "immature testicular tissue may become an option" to preserve boys' fertility, Nina Neuhaus and Stefan Schlatt of the Center of Reproductive Medicine and Andrology in Muenster, Germany, wrote in an accompanying editorial.</p><p>Meanwhile, "it's important for parents to know about this," said Christine Hanlon of Holiday, Florida, who took her son Dylan to Pittsburgh to have his tissue stored when he was newly diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma at age 9.</p><p>Today Dylan is a healthy teen, and no one knows if he'll ever need the stored tissue, one of more than 200 samples Orwig's study has preserved. But Hanlon was thrilled to learn the research is moving along, just in case.</p><p>"You lose part of your childhood in cancer treatment," Hanlon said. "If there was a chance I could help him have normalcy in his future, with the potential of having a family if that's what he decided to do, I wanted to be able to."</p><p>The Associated Press Health &amp; Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.</p>

    1 March 22, 2019
  • Bride was diagnosed with cancer days before dream wedding

    Bride was diagnosed with cancer days before dream wedding

    ritten, or redistributed. ©2019 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes. </p><p>&#x201C;When you get sick, you have two options,&#x201D; Ashley Heil, 27, told SWNS. &#x201C;You can be upbeat and make the best of it, or you can be unhappy and make it hard for you and everyone around you.&#x201D;</p><p>Heil, who said she had a 6.5-centimeter tumor on her left kidney and an abscess that was infecting her bloodstream, had initially chalked her symptoms up to stress about the wedding.</p><p>&#x201C;I thought it was just stress, I had 150 guests coming to my wedding,&#x201D; she told SWNS. &#x201C;My priority was looking pretty&#x2026; but my husband-to-be insisted I went to the hospital.&#x201D;</p><p>An MRI and blood test reportedly revealed the seriousness of her illness, and she had a PICC line inserted to deliver antibiotics. She did not reveal what type of cancer she was diagnosed with.&#xA0;At that point, her parents suggested she postpone the wedding, SWNS reported.</p><p>&#x201C;I thought the show must go on,&#x201D; she said, of her 2015 nuptials. &#x201C;I accepted I was going to have this in my arm for my wedding. We got a little backpack to put the IV pump into. Doctors gave me pain medicine so I could go to my wedding for the day.&#x201D;</p><p>The medication caused Heil to swell, and a friend devised an armband to disguise her PICC line.</p><p>&#x201C;I was worried about fitting in my dress because I was very puffy with the IV I had been giving over the last five days,&#x201D; she told SWNS.</p><p>She removed her shoes when she got to the altar, and she and husband Ben Scheirer&#xA0;altered plans involving the ring part of the ceremony so that she didn&#x2019;t have to remove it.</p><p>The day after the festivities, Heil told SWNS she began a two-month hospital stay. She said her groom stayed by her side for 53 nights. After her release, the couple moved in with her parents so they could help with her care.</p><p>&#x201C;I&#x2019;m so glad I just did it and married the man of my dreams,&#x201D; she told SWNS, of her wedding.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2019 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 March 21, 2019

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