Brian Kemp steps down as Georgia’s secretary of state

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His resignation comes after Kemp was criticized for months for remaining in the seat, which oversees elections, while running against Stacey Abrams.

She has told her supporters to be ready for a Dec. 4 runoff.

The latest tally has Kemp ahead of Abrams by about 63,000 votes — 13,000 over the 50 percent threshold.

The Georgia chapter of the NAACP has filed two lawsuits alleging students at Morehouse and Spelman colleges were forced to vote by provisional ballot or kept from voting because their names didn’t appear on voter registration lists.

The other suit aims to protect votes at a recreational center where voters had to wait for hours in long lines because of a lack of polling machines.

Kemp’s spokesman said Abrams’ campaign is using “old math.”

News Corp. is a network of leading companies in the world of diversified media, news, and information services.

 

November 08, 2018

Sources: New York Post

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  • European Court Vindicates Aleksei Navalny, Russian Opposition Leader

    European Court Vindicates Aleksei Navalny, Russian Opposition Leader

    er Aleksei A. Navalny during street protests amount to a politically motivated campaign to silence him, Europe’s top human rights court ruled on Thursday, in a rare finding that a government had abused its prosecutorial powers with political intent.</p><p>Observers of the work of the European Court of Human Rights called the decision an embarrassment for the Russian government, as it was only the 11th ruling on abuse of such powers in the court’s nearly 60-year history.</p><p>Russia has for years faced a barrage of criticism over hard-line domestic politics under President Vladimir V. Putin, who has squelched independent news outlets and routinely jailed opponents.</p><p>But the ruling came at a delicate time in relations between the European Court of Human Rights and the Russian government, raising fears that in response to a decision vindicating an opponent of Mr. Putin’s, Russia could drop out of the treaty that formed the court.</p><p>Over the years, Mr. Navalny, a former real estate lawyer and Russia’s most prominent opposition politician, has been arrested dozens of times, usually under Russian laws against taking part in protests without a permit or in organizing them. Once, he was arrested while merely walking on a sidewalk.</p><p>The flurry of short detentions have ranged from a few days to weeks, and have kept Mr. Navalny out of public view before elections, avoiding the possible backlash at home and abroad that would most likely come from imprisoning him for a single, lengthy spell. The European court considered seven of Mr. Navalny’s dozens of arrests.</p><p>The ruling at an appeals level of the court, known as the Grand Chamber, found that Mr. Navalny’s arrests formed part of Russia’s “general move to bring the opposition under control.”</p><p>The court ordered the Russian government to pay Mr. Navalny 63,678 euros, or about $72,000, in compensation and legal fees and to alter its laws on public assembly to bring them into compliance with the European Convention on Human Rights. The court, based in Strasbourg, France, was founded in 1959 to enforce this postwar convention on European freedoms.</p><p>Mr. Navalny had won rulings against the Russian government over the same seven arrests in February 2017, when the court decided they were arbitrary, that he had not received fair trials and that his right to assembly had been violated.</p><p>The appeal handed him an additional victory for two of the seven arrests under an article that prohibits ulterior motives in prosecutions, including political motives, and that has an extraordinarily high bar of proof, lawyers who have litigated at the court said.</p><p>“My sense is the European Court of Human Rights has really done its job,” said Grigory V. Vaypan, a lawyer at the Institute of Law and Public Policy in Moscow. “For many people in Russia, the prosecutions of Navalny have looked political from the outset.”</p><p>The ruling comes at a tense moment, as Moscow, angry over previous rulings, has already threatened to withdraw from the court’s jurisdiction, ending a post-Cold War effort to integrate Russia into the Continent’s human rights architecture.</p><p>A judgment under the rule, Article 18, “essentially accuses the member state of lying” about the reasons for prosecutorial action, Jeffrey D. Kahn, a law professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas and an authority on the European Court of Human Rights, said by telephone.</p><p>“That’s a pretty monumental decision,” he said, particularly as it was accompanied by an order to loosen laws on public assembly.</p><p>Russia has more cases before the court than any other country. In October, 10,950 allegations of rights abuse were pending against the Russian government, about 19 percent of the total docket. Russia has stopped paying dues for the court’s operations, and senior Russian officials say the country may soon sever ties.</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • Afghan Military Deaths Since 2015: More Than 28,000

    Afghan Military Deaths Since 2015: More Than 28,000

    ers and soldiers have been killed since 2015, the Afghan president revealed this week, breaking with his government’s longstanding suppression of casualty totals.</p><p>Taliban insurgents also killed dozens of police officers and soldiers in a series of attacks in Farah Province, and an additional 14 police officers in an attack on a police station in the central city of Ghazni.</p><p>“Since 2015, still much regrettable, but the entire loss of American forces in Afghanistan is 58 Americans. In the same period, 28,529 of our security forces have lost their lives,” Mr. Ghani said.</p><p>To put Mr. Ghani’s figure in context, it means that the current death rate is on average about 25 police officers and soldiers a day, or 175 a week — more than 9,000 a year. By comparison, in 2013 there were occasional weeks in which the death toll for the government exceeded 100, but the average was far less.</p><p>If the average week now is nearly twice as bad as a bad week in 2013, the losses are even less sustainable — although American military leaders are not talking publicly about that now.</p><p>Here is how the current rate is calculated. Mr. Ghani said that 28,529 security force members had been killed since the beginning of 2015. Previously released government data confirmed 5,000 deaths in 2015 and nearly 7,000 in 2016. That leaves 16,529 over the past 23 months (Mr. Ghani did not specify how up to date his figure was, but he spoke on Monday). Assuming, conservatively, that losses have held steady in 2017 and 2018, that is an average of about 175 a week.</p><p>Even with a larger force, however, the government has been fighting a largely static war, guarding facilities, roads, bases and outposts throughout the country, while the Taliban have been free to pick their targets and concentrate their forces.</p><p>But most deaths among the Afghan security forces continue to be those of police officers and soldiers at relatively isolated outposts, as military leaders struggle with local politicians who want their areas protected.</p><p>“Is the state at risk of collapse?” he said. “No. Why? Because as long as we have our commando forces and our air force, we will be able to retake. Are the losses horrific? Yes.”</p><p>Verifying that claim is difficult; only in rare cases are the authorities able to produce bodies or photographs as evidence. That is partly because the insurgents generally try to take away their dead, and unlike government casualties, they rarely end up in hospitals or morgues.</p><p>The low number of American casualties reflects the fact that most of the fighting is being done by the Afghans. Of the 14,000 American troops in Afghanistan now, only about half are Special Operations troops involved in combat missions. By comparison, in 2011 there were more than 100,000 American soldiers in Afghanistan.</p><p>Najim Rahim contributed reporting from Kabul, and Taimoor Shah from Kandahar.</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • World War 3 fears GROW as Chinese President demands ‘preparations for fighting a WAR’

    World War 3 fears GROW as Chinese President demands ‘preparations for fighting a WAR’

    wnload the newspaper, order back issues and use the historic Daily Express newspaper archive. </p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • 8 U.N. Peacekeepers Killed in Congo in Area Facing Ebola Outbreak

    8 U.N. Peacekeepers Killed in Congo in Area Facing Ebola Outbreak

    se soldiers were killed in a joint military operation against rebels in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is facing a deadly Ebola outbreak, the Security Council said Thursday.</p><p>Ten peacekeepers were injured and one was missing after Wednesday’s operation that targeted Allied Democratic Forces rebels, said the United Nations spokesman, Stéphane Dujarric.</p><p>The Security Council’s statement said seven of the peacekeepers who were killed were from Malawi and one was from Tanzania.</p><p>The joint forces were attacked while conducting operations to dislodge the rebel fighters from a stronghold in Kididiwe, near the regional capital of Beni, a United Nations official said. The mission succeeded and a number of rebels were captured, the official added, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly.</p><p>Congo’s volatile east is home to many armed groups vying for control of the mineral-rich region, and the Allied Democratic Forces are especially active in the Beni area.</p><p>The Security Council called on all armed groups to stop the violence immediately and lay down their arms. It also urged Congolese authorities to apprehend and bring to justice the perpetrators of attacks on civilians, national security forces and the peacekeepers.</p><p>The Security Council emphasized “that deliberate attacks targeting peacekeepers may constitute war crimes under international law.”</p><p>The Allied Democratic Forces group originated in Uganda as a rebel movement against that country’s government. A military campaign forced them to relocate to eastern Congo.</p><p>Since October 2014, the group’s fighters have killed more than 1,500 people in the Beni region. United Nations investigators blamed the Allied Democratic Forces for the deadliest single assault on the peacekeeping mission in Congo in almost 25 years, an attack last Dec. 7 at a base near Beni that killed 15 Tanzanian peacekeepers and wounded 43 others.</p><p>In recent attacks, the group has also killed civilians and abducted children in the Beni region.</p><p>Rebel attacks have forced suspension of efforts to contain the Ebola outbreak in some areas.</p><p>Dr. Peter Salama, the emergencies chief for the World Health Organization, predicted Tuesday that Congo’s Ebola outbreak, which has killed more than 200 people, will last at least six more months.</p><p>The outbreak is “arguably the most difficult context that we’ve ever encountered,” Dr. Salama said, pointing to activities of the armed rebel groups in the region.</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • North Korea Says It Has Tested ‘Ultramodern Tactical Weapon’

    North Korea Says It Has Tested ‘Ultramodern Tactical Weapon’

    y said Mr. Kim visited the testing ground of the Academy of Defense Science, the center of weapons development in North Korea, and “supervised a newly developed ultramodern tactical weapon test.”</p><p>“After seeing the power of the tactical weapon, Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un was so excited to say that another great work was done by the defense scientists and munitions industrial workers to increase the defense capability of the country,” the news agency reported.</p><p>The South Korean daily newspaper Chosun Ilbo on Friday quoted anonymous government sources as saying that North Korea had tested multiple-rocket launchers this month. Besides the North’s nuclear weapons, such rockets are considered one of the greatest military threats against South Korea because the North deploys them near the inter-Korean border to target the South’s capital, Seoul, a city of 10 million people.</p><p>Many Western experts still doubt that North Korea has mastered all the technologies needed to deliver a small nuclear warhead on such missiles. Still, following the November test, Mr. Kim said his country no longer needed to conduct nuclear and long-range missile tests because it had achieved the capability to hit the United States with nuclear missiles.</p><p>But the Singapore agreement was short on specifics, and subsequent negotiations on carrying it out have since stalled.</p><p>North Korea has pledged to dismantle its Yongbyon nuclear complex, a center for producing nuclear bomb fuel, and take other actions, but will do so only if Washington takes “corresponding” steps, like easing sanctions and signing a peace declaration. It has also expressed anger in recent days at South Korea’s resumption of small-scale military drills with the United States.</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • Tory minister sparks Question Time row by accusing David Dimbleby of 'hating it when women talk'  

    Tory minister sparks Question Time row by accusing David Dimbleby of 'hating it when women talk'  

    last night after she accused David Dimbleby of 'hating it when women talk'. </p><p>Miss Perry was speaking in support of the PM's Brexit proposals after a day of political drama in Westminster which left Mrs May's career hanging by a thread. </p><p>Claire Perry (right) came under fire for her appearance on BBC Question Time last night in which she accused presenter David Dimbleby (left) of 'hating it when women talk' </p><p>During last night's show Miss Perry was defending Mrs May, saying: 'We have a workable deal on the table and the alternative is inflicting needless harm on hundreds of thousands of people's livelihoods'. </p><p>As she moved on to speak about a possible general election, Dimbleby tried to stop her mid-flow and let another panellist speak. </p><p>Looking at the audience, Miss Perry said: 'I know you hate it when women talk', prompting oohs and nervous laughter from spectators. </p><p>She turned to Dimbleby and laughed, but the 80-year-old BBC presenter was unimpressed, saying: 'That's outrageous. That is outrageous.' </p><p>Miss Perry tried to defuse the tension, saying: 'I love you really', but Dimbleby continued to defend himself. </p><p>He said: 'I don't want you to love me, I want you just to accept that there are five people on the panel and maybe the conversation should be in fifths.'  </p><p>Veteran BBC host Dimbleby (left) hit back at Perry (right), calling the claim 'outrageous' and asking the Tory MP to 'accept there are five people on the panel'</p><p>Miss Perry (pictured) was speaking in support of the PM's Brexit proposals after a day of political drama in Westminster which left Mrs May's career hanging by a thread</p><p>Labour MP Chris Williamson slammed her contributions, saying: 'It was utterly contemptible for Claire Perry to resort to despicable smears on Question Time tonight when she was unable to defend her govt's abject failure on Brexit.' </p><p>In an earlier Question Time appearance Miss Perry told Piers Morgan that 'sometimes you have to actually listen to women' when the Good Morning Britain host appeared on the show. </p><p>The 54-year-old was one of the ministers to come to Mrs May's defence during Wednesday's marathon Cabinet meeting.  </p><p>Labour's Barry Gardiner, Plaid Cymru's Liz Saville Roberts, journalist Tim Stanley and union boss Mark Serwotka were also on last night's Question Time panel.   </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • Japanese PM Shinzo Abe visits Darwin commemorate Darwin bombing killed hundreds during World War II

    Japanese PM Shinzo Abe visits Darwin commemorate Darwin bombing killed hundreds during World War II

    ce his nation's army bombed the city during World War II, killing hundreds of Australians.</p><p>The 1942 bombing was the largest single foreign attack ever launched against Australia.</p><p>Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (pictured) is paying a historic visit to Darwin in a powerful sign of its warm relations with Australia</p><p>He will lay a wreath at the city's cenotaph with Mr Morrison and inspect a memorial of the 80-crew Japanese submarine I-124, which was sunk off Darwin in January 1942 and remains there.</p><p>The visit would also 'recognise the importance of the reconciliation that followed between our countries', Mr Morrison said.</p><p>'Prime Minister Abe's visit is deeply symbolic and significant and it will build on our two countries' strong and enduring friendship as well as our economic, security, community and historical ties,' he said.</p><p>Mr Abe is the first Japanese leader to visit the city since his nation's army bombed the city in February 1942 during World War II, killing hundreds of Australians</p><p>The visit would also 'recognise the importance of the reconciliation that followed between our countries', Prime Minister Scott Morrison said</p><p>Darwin is a key part of Japan's energy security through the recently completed $55 billion LNG project operated by Japan's Inpex.</p><p>The Ichthys LNG venture is the biggest foreign investment made by Japan as it has moved away from nuclear power since the Fukushima disaster.</p><p>The first gas shipment left Darwin for Japan last month.</p><p>On Thursday, Inpex president Takayuki Ueda announced a $24 million package over 40 years, including benefits for indigenous education and the elderly.</p><p>He said the support of locals including the Larrakia people made Darwin a friendly location to ship gas in a stable, democratic country. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • Donald Tusk claims no Brexit is more likely than a no-deal Brexit

    Donald Tusk claims no Brexit is more likely than a no-deal Brexit

    Brexit to be reversed as EU officials warned that Britain could not expect to renegotiate the exit deal.</p><p>The EU Council president said the bloc was more prepared for a 'no-Brexit' scenario than a 'no-deal' one.</p><p>Meanwhile, European Union officials insisted that they would not throw Mrs May a lifeline by re-writing the 585 page withdrawal pact, saying they could compromise no further.</p><p>When asked about events in London at a press conference yesterday Mr Tusk said: 'It's obvious for me Brexit is the most important issue today for the EU and for the rest of the world. </p><p>EU council chief Donald Tusk said leaders will gather to approve the long-awaited text on November 25 - but raised eyebrows by adding the caveat 'if nothing extraordinary happens'</p><p>'It is not for me to comment on the latest developments in London. All I can say is that the EU is prepared for a final deal with the United Kingdom in November.'</p><p>But he added: 'We are also prepared for a no-deal scenario, but of course we are best prepared for a no-Brexit scenario.' He then grinned broadly.</p><p>Last night, German chancellor Angela Merkel also suggested there could be no return to the negotiating table. 'We have a document on the table that Britain and the EU27 have agreed to, so for me there is no question at the moment whether we negotiate further,' she said.</p><p>Earlier, during a joint press conference Mr Tusk and the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, held aloft a copy of the proposed withdrawal deal. Mr Tusk said: 'I took good note of Prime Minister May's statement yesterday [in Downing Street]. </p><p>'Of course I don't share the Prime Minister's enthusiasm about Brexit as such. Since the very beginning we have had no doubt that Brexit is a lose-lose situation and that our negotiations are only about damage control.'</p><p>He also announced that a special Brexit summit would take place on November 25 to finalise a deal provided that 'nothing extraordinary happens' between now and then.</p><p>Suggesting EU member states would also have to swallow the deal, he called for EU ambassadors not to make 'too many comments' when they scrutinise it today. </p><p>On Monday ministers from the 27 remaining EU states will also analyse the text.</p><p>Speaking at a press conference alongside Michel Barnier in Brussels today (pictured), Mr Tusk said ambassadors from the EU states would meet this week to consider the situation</p><p>Mr Tusk added: 'Let me say this to our British friends. As much as I am sad to see you leave I will do everything to make this farewell as painless as possible both for you and for us.' </p><p>His suggestion that the EU is prepared for a Brexit reversal rallied Remainers yesterday. Liberal Democrat leader Sir Vince Cable said: 'It's good to see that 'no Brexit' is clearly on the table from the EU.'</p><p>Mr Barnier hailed Wednesday's announcement of a deal as 'a very important moment' which 'lays the ground for an ambitious partnership', adding: 'What we have agreed at negotiators level is fair and balanced.' But he also warned: 'Our work is not finished – we still have a long road ahead of us on both sides. We have no time to lose.'</p><p>It came as eurocrats insisted they could compromise no further on the proposed treaty, scotching hopes that they could return to the negotiating table if Mrs May is toppled or the UK Parliament votes it down. </p><p>A leading EU official said: 'On both sides we have exhausted our margin of manoeuvre under our respective mandates.</p><p>'We are happy to stand over this agreement and we think this is the best we can do collectively with the restraints we have on both sides.'</p><p>Guy Verhofstadt, the EU parliament's chief Brexit co-ordinator, said: 'There is not a lot of room for manoeuvre to say, 'OK, let's start again'.'      </p><p>Senior MEP Guy Verhofstadt (pictured at a conference in Madrid last week)  the European Parliament's Brexit Coordinator, hailed the positive progress made in the Brexit talks today</p><p>Theresa May has secured her deal in Brussels but her fight to get it actually in place in time for Brexit day is just beginning.</p><p>If the Cabinet agrees to the deal the biggest hurdle will be the 'meaningful vote' on the plans in Parliament.</p><p>This is expected to take place in December to ensure the deal is over its biggest hurdle before the end of the year.</p><p>The Prime Minister needs at least 318 votes in the Commons if all 650 MPs turns up - but can probably only be confident of around 230 votes.</p><p>The number is less than half because the four Speakers, 7 Sinn Fein MPs and four tellers will not take part.</p><p>To win, Mrs May will need to get back around half of the 80 hardcore Tory Brexiteer rebels and secure the support of the 10 DUP MPs.</p><p>Even then she will probably still need the help of dozens of Labour MPs to save her deal and possibly her job.</p><p>Theresa May will need 318 votes in the Commons if every single MP turns up. She can only rely on about 230 votes - meaning she will need to get back around half of the 80 hardcore Tory Brexiteer rebels and secure the support of the 10 DUP MPs, plus dozens of Labour MPs </p><p>What do they want? For the Prime Minister to survive, get her deal and reach exit day with the minimum of fuss.</p><p>Many junior ministers want promotion while many of the Cabinet want to be in a position to take the top job when Mrs May goes.</p><p>The group's deputy leader Mark Francois said today there were at least 40 hard liners who would vote against the deal in all circumstances.</p><p>This is based on a trade deal signed between the EU and Canada in August 2014 that eliminated 98 per cent of tariffs and taxes charged on goods shipped across the Atlantic.</p><p>The EU has long said it would be happy to do a deal based on Canada - but warn it would only work for Great Britain and not Northern Ireland.</p><p>The ERG say the model can be adapted to work for the whole UK. They say Northern Ireland can be included by using technology on the Irish border to track goods and make sure products which don't meet EU rules do not enter the single market.</p><p>They also say it would give complete freedom for Britain to sign new trade deals around the world to replace any losses in trade with the EU.</p><p>The group is content to leave the EU without a deal if Brussels will not give in.</p><p>There are also many unaligned Tory MPs who are desperate to talk about anything else.</p><p>It is less interested in the exact form of the deal but many in it have said Mrs May's Chequers plan will not work.</p><p>Mr Boles has set out a proposal for Britain to stay in the European Economic Area (EEA) until a free trade deal be negotiated - effectively to leave the EU but stay in close orbit as a member of the single market.</p><p>This would take about six months from start to finish and they group wants Remain as an option on the ballot paper, probably with Mrs May's deal as the alternative.</p><p>There are established pro-Remain campaigns born out of the losing Britain Stronger in Europe campaign from 2016. It is supported by Tony Blair, the Liberal Democrats and assorted pro-EU politicians outside the Tory party.</p><p>They are Unionist and say Brexit is good but must not carve Northern Ireland out of the Union.</p><p>Labour insists it wants a 'jobs first Brexit' that includes a permanent customs union with the EU. It says it is ready to restart negotiations with the EU with a short extension to the Article 50 process.</p><p>The party has six tests Mrs May's deal must pass to get Labour votes.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • Pete Doherty's unleashed Siberian huskies 'savagely killed a neighbour's pet cat'

    Pete Doherty's unleashed Siberian huskies 'savagely killed a neighbour's pet cat'

    was claimed last night.</p><p>The Libertines frontman, 39, was walking his Siberian huskies near his home in Margate, Kent on Monday morning when they allegedly lept over a garden wall and snatched a retired nurse's black kitten. </p><p>Witnesses said they saw one of the dogs running around with the cat in its mouth before the other tried to prise it away with its teeth.</p><p>Pete Doherty's dogs (pictured with him) savagely killed a pet cat on walk, it was claimed last night</p><p>The Libertines frontman, 39, was walking his Siberian huskies near his home in Margate, Kent on Monday morning when they allegedly lept over a garden wall and snatched a cat</p><p>A witness claimed the mauling went on for ten minutes and Doherty did nothing to stop it. </p><p>The cat's owner, 70-year-old Penny Ward, fumed: 'It is disgusting that he should be taking powerful and aggressive dogs like that for walks off their leads.</p><p>'He is responsible for my cat Archie's death. It could have been a child. I hope he's a better singer than a dog owner.'</p><p>She said Doherty has not even offered her an apology. </p><p>Dog experts say it is common for huskies - the new 'must have' dog - to attack small animals because of their strong hunting instincts.</p><p>Police have not questioned Doherty because lawyers said it is likely no crime was committed. He did not comment on the incident.</p><p>The cat's owner, 70-year-old Penny Ward, fumed: 'It is disgusting that he should be taking powerful and aggressive dogs like that for walks off their leads. Pictured: Doherty with his dog</p><p>Pete Doherty and Kate Moss at the 2007 Glastonbury Festival at Worthy Farm in Pilton, Somerset</p><p>Famous for his wild days of drug taking and dating Kate Moss, Doherty has recently turned his attention to revamping his hotel in Margate.</p><p>The Palm Court Hotel, which closed last year, was one of the country's worst guesthouses with shocking reviews.</p><p>Before being purchased for £500,000 by The Libertines last year, the hotel earned just one star out of five on TripAdviser from unhappy guests. </p><p>Since then Doherty and his bandmates including Carl Barat, 40, have spectacularly revamped the hotel's exterior giving it a trendy black and gold look, and renamed it The Albion Rooms.</p><p>Building work was estimated to have been finished by the end of the summer - but seems some way to go before the renovation is completed. </p><p>Dog experts say it is common for huskies - the new 'must have' dog - to attack small animals because of their strong hunting instincts. Pictured: Doherty with one of his dogs</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • Raab accused of quitting in bid to replace May with Gove and Mordaunt on the brink

    Raab accused of quitting in bid to replace May with Gove and Mordaunt on the brink

    drawal deal, despite spending months in negotiations after he replaced David Davis in July. </p><p>His departure, which has fuelled accusations he is manoeuvring for a leadership bid, sparked a series of resignations which may continue today.</p><p>Michael Gove's future is unclear after he reportedly turned down the chance to replace Mr Raab, as the PM refused to let him renegotiate the deal with Brussels himself. </p><p>International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt and Transport Secretary Chris Grayling are also rumoured to be on the verge of quitting the Government. </p><p>Theresa May could be hit by further resignations from her Cabinet amid a bitter row over her Brexit deal with Penny Mordaunt and Michael Gove reportedly on the brink of quitting </p><p>Ms Mordaunt used meetings with Mrs May and Cabinet Secretary Mark Sedwill to argue that there should be a free vote in the Commons on the Brexit deal.</p><p>That would liberate her from collective responsibility, allowing her to remain in Cabinet while voting against the plan, but government sources indicated that 'not a lot' changed as a result of the meetings.  </p><p>Meanwhile Commons Leader and pro-Brexit MP Andrea Leadsom insists she has no plans to quit the Cabinet.</p><p>Mr Gove considered the job offer a 'poisoned chalice' which would force him to deliver a Brexit deal he did not believe in, the Times reported. </p><p>The Environment Secretary had delivered his ultimatum to Theresa May 15 minutes before she was due to face the cameras. </p><p>Mrs May dodged questions about Mr Gove and whether she was struggling to fill her empty Cabinet posts when she appeared at a press conference in London.</p><p>Mr Raab - who was last night the bookmakers' favourite to succeed Mrs May - is said to believe he was blindsided by the final Brexit deal, and that it had been changed when it was shown to the Cabinet on Wednesday.</p><p>Sources said he was thrown by a new commitment that said the backstop arrangement – a hybrid of the customs union and single market – would be the starting point for negotiations on the future EU-UK trade relationship. </p><p>Dominic Raab (pictured) is said to believe he was blindsided by the final Brexit deal, and that it had been changed when it was shown to the Cabinet on Wednesday</p><p>Michael Gove (left) and Penny Mordaunt (right) are said to be on the verge of quitting the Government amid a bitter Tory feud over the Prime Minister's Brexit plans </p><p>Mr Raab reportedly knew he would quit when he sat in the five-hour Cabinet meeting on Wednesday, feeling 'mugged off' by the proposals. </p><p>He had been due to fly to Brussels for a joint celebratory announcement with EU negotiator Michel Barnier but had already made his mind up to resign. </p><p>The Leave campaigner yesterday urged the Prime Minister to go back to Brussels with a 'best, final offer'.</p><p>His decision, announced just before 9am, piled pressure on Mrs May. He was blasted by a Cabinet colleague who branded him a 'carpet-bagger' – a derogatory term for someone who takes advantage of a situation.</p><p>Scottish Secretary David Mundell said Mr Raab's resignation was about 'manoeuvring and leadership'.</p><p>He was also criticised by Remain-supporting Tory MP Anna Soubry, who said on Twitter that his treatment of the Prime Minister had been 'shameful'. She said: 'Raab signed up to her Withdrawal Agreement allowing her to make her statement after Cabinet knowing he'd resign in time for the 9am News bulletins the next morning.'</p><p>In his letter to Mrs May, Mr Raab said the proposals on Northern Ireland threatened the integrity of the UK and Britain would be locked indefinitely into a customs union 'backstop' with no say on the rules and no exit mechanism.</p><p>He wrote: 'No democratic nation has ever signed up to be bound by such an extensive regime, imposed externally without any democratic control over the laws to be applied, nor the ability to decide to exit the arrangement.' He added: 'I cannot in good conscience support the terms proposed for our deal with the EU.'</p><p>He claimed the deal would damage both the economy and public trust. Sources said he was thrown by a new commitment that said the backstop arrangement could work as a model for the future trade deal. 'Everyone was shocked,' said the source. 'He asked 'Who mandated this?' but there wasn't an answer.'</p><p>Following the five-hour Cabinet meeting on Wednesday, Mr Raab took Chief Whip Julian Smith in a side-room and said that he could not sign up to the 'indefensible' deal and would have to resign. </p><p>The Prime Minister used a press conference in Downing Street (pictured) to double down on her determination to press ahead with her controversial pact with the EU</p><p>Mr Raab told the BBC yesterday: 'I've been fighting for a good Brexit deal but the terms proposed had two major and fatal flaws. The first is that the terms threaten the integrity of the United Kingdom and the second is they would lead to an indefinite if not permanent situation where we're locked into a regime with no say over the rules, with no exit mechanism.'</p><p>In a later interview, Mr Raab said Mrs May had to 'change course' to get the deal past Parliament. He added: 'We need to go back to Brussels and make a best, final offer. I think we can do a deal with our EU partners but at the same time we must be willing to show some resolve to walk away. That would cause short-term disruption but we can manage it.'</p><p>Mr Raab became the second Brexit Secretary to quit in four months. He had been promoted to the Cabinet to replace David Davis, who stepped down in protest at Mrs May's Chequers plan. </p><p>Pensions Secretary Esther McVey also quit, saying the deal 'does not honour the result of the referendum'. </p><p>Shailesh Vara quit as Northern Ireland minister, Suella Braverman resigned as a Brexit minister, and Anne-Marie Trevelyan stood down as a parliamentary private secretary in the Department for Education.</p><p>They were joined by Ranil Jayawardena, a parliamentary private secretary in the Ministry of Justice, and Rehman Chishti, the Conservative vice-chairman and prime ministerial trade envoy to Pakistan. </p><p>Within the Tory ranks some 17 MPs have publicly stated that they have submitted letters of no confidence to Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the backbench 1922 Committee responsible for Tory leadership elections.  </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 November 16, 2018

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