Warship in danger of SINKING after colliding with oil tanker in Norwegian fjord

Up to eight people were injured in the collision in the Hjeltefjord near Bergen, Norway, when the KNM Helge Ingstad crashed into a vessel from Malta.

The warship is currently in danger of sinking, while the tanker, named the Sola TS, is slightly damaged and did not spill oil.

The collision happened yesterday morning at 3am (4am local time) during a training session, officials have confirmed.

The tanker had set sail from Equinor's Sture oil terminal with a cargo of North Sea crude.

Nato's Allied Maritime Command said in a statement: “Due to the damage to the frigate it was moved to a safe place.”

The tanker, which was carrying a crew of 23, was returned to port for an inspection.

It is unclear what caused the collision but several oil and gas terminals were shut down as a precaution.

These included the Sture export oil terminal, the Kollsnes gas plant and several offshore oilfields, all of which resumed operation later yesterday afternoon.

The Sture terminal sees more than 25 percent of Norway’s oil production pas through the facility, while the Kollsnes plant processes gas for a number of EU member states as well as the UK.

A source told AFP news agency a “small oil slick” was detected from the warship and that “it took on a lot of water and there is a real danger that it sinks where it is”.

Twitter users are waiting to see if the huge vessel sinks while uploading images onto social media.

One said: “The situation is going bad to worse for Norwegian frigate #HelgeIngstad.”

An image of the ship tipped to one side was posted with the comment.

It can take a significant amount of time for larger ships to sink, with some taking up to 15 hours to be fully submerged under water.

The KNM Helge Ingstad frigate was launched in November 2007 and measures 134 metres long.

See today's front and back pages, download the newspaper, order back issues and use the historic Daily Express newspaper archive.

 

November 09, 2018

Sources: Daily Express

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  • Care home owners could now be jailed for charging families or residents 'unfair' fees 

    Care home owners could now be jailed for charging families or residents 'unfair' fees 

    ous' charges could be jailed under new rules.</p><p>Some providers have been making families fork out 'death fees' for up to a month after their loved one had died.</p><p>Others have been charging upfront costs of up to £5,000 before residents have moved in, without explaining what the money was for.</p><p>Care home owners were getting people to sign hidden clauses that put elderly people at rick of short-notice eviction</p><p>But under new guidance from the Government's Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), care homes will be obliged to be honest about their fees and practices. </p><p>Providers who are found to be treating families or residents unfairly could face a criminal prosecution and jail.</p><p>One care home had been making families sign up to a hidden clause which meant their loved ones could be evicted with just 24 hours' notice.</p><p>The contract stated that the home had the right to evict a resident if their behaviour was deemed to be 'detrimental'. </p><p>The CMA will be carrying out a review of homes next year to check they are complying with consumer law.</p><p>Caroline Dinenage branded the behaviour of some care homes a 'scandal'</p><p>Care minister Caroline Dinenage, who is also the MP for Gosport in Hampshire, said: 'It is a scandal some of the most vulnerable people in our society are being taken for a ride by a minority of unscrupulous care home providers. </p><p>We're very clear that everyone living in a care home should be treated fairly and with respect and dignity.'</p><p>An investigation by the CMA last December found that families were being made to pay unfair charges just to keep care homes afloat.</p><p>One operator, Maria Mallaband, which runs 64 homes across the UK, was slapping on death fees for up to one month after residents had died.</p><p>It stopped the charges in January but many other homes are suspected of deploying similar practices.</p><p>Andrea Coscelli, chief executive of the CMA, said: 'It's vital that care homes treat residents and their families fairly.</p><p>'We've already taken action against some providers who charged compulsory upfront fees or continued to charge for extended periods after a resident's death.</p><p>'We'll continue to monitor how well care homes are complying and won't hesitate to take action again if we find evidence that providers have broken consumer law.'</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • Two-thirds of Britain's bank branches have closed over the past 30 years - many towns without any

    Two-thirds of Britain's bank branches have closed over the past 30 years - many towns without any

    e last 30 years – leaving millions of customers without a service.</p><p>The relentless closures mean that a fifth of households are now more than three kilometres (1.8miles) from their nearest branch, according to consumer group Which?.</p><p>Almost one in ten customers travel more than five kilometres (3.1miles) and 6 per cent are more than six kilometres (3.7miles) away.</p><p>Ann Smith from Purley in Surrey used to bank in Coulsdon until her branch closed this summer</p><p>Ann Smith was left high and dry last year when her local NatWest branch closed its doors.</p><p>The former French teacher, who lives in Purley, Surrey, did her banking at a branch in Coulsdon, which closed in June last year.</p><p>She said the closure had a major impact on her banking, adding: ‘It’s nonsense to claim that people don’t need branches any more.</p><p>‘I don’t do online banking as I don’t feel very happy with the security side of things.’</p><p>The branch said it was closing due to ‘a reduction in customer footfall’, but the 74-year-old said there was always a queue. She added: ‘Customers feel their loyalty has been taken for granted.’ </p><p>Closures hit rural communities especially hard, with those on low incomes and the elderly most likely to suffer.</p><p>Tory MP Simon Clarke, a member of the Treasury committee, which is investigating the diminishing accessibility of financial services, said: ‘Banks are depriving people of essential services.</p><p>‘With no bank manager on hand vulnerable people are left without any guidance on financial matters.’</p><p>Parliamentary records show there were 20,583 branches in 1988, but the consumer group’s analysis shows that there are just 7,586 today.</p><p>Sparsely-populated parts of Scotland account for the top 70 communities farthest from a bank.</p><p>Areas where recent closures have led to towns or villages without a single branch include Lymm in Cheshire, Broseley in Shropshire, Fishguard in Pembrokeshire and Sturminster Newton in Dorset.</p><p>While banks argue that one of the country’s 11,500 Post Office branches can plug the gap, there are many crucial banking services they do not offer.</p><p>These include opening or closing accounts, transferring money between accounts, making a complaint about the bank and requesting a replacement debit card.</p><p>Banks also require customers to call into a branch for matters such as anti-fraud checks or to discuss legal documents such as lasting power of attorney.</p><p>Almost half of those surveyed by Which? said they were unlikely to use a Post Office for banking services, questioning the level of staff expertise in financial services and complaining about long queues.</p><p>Martin Kearsley, banking services director at the Post Office, said: ‘We are uniquely placed to bring vital services to local communities right across the country. It’s a responsibility that we take very seriously.’</p><p>This former NatWest branch in Coulsdon, Surrey, closed down in June and retired French teacher Ann Smith says, 'It’s nonsense to claim that people don’t need branches any more'</p><p>For many smaller towns and people in rural locations, the loss of a local bank has been compounded by cash machines closing.</p><p>Parliamentary records show there were 20,583 branches in 1988, but the consumer group’s analysis shows that there are just 7,586 today. </p><p>Sparsely-populated parts of Scotland account for the top 70 communities farthest from a bank.</p><p>In June Which? revealed free cash machines are closing at a rate of 300 a month – forcing people to use machines that typically charge £1.70.</p><p>Ceri Stanaway of Which? said: ‘The true scale of bank branch closures in recent decades is staggering – and has left millions of people struggling to access the vital financial services and cash they need.</p><p>‘For many there is simply no substitute for a dedicated branch and the wide range of services it offers and many customers now face having to travel long distances if they are to avoid financial exclusion.’</p><p>A spokesman for trade association UK Finance said: ‘Bank branches play an important role in the life of local communities and decisions to close them are never taken lightly.’</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 November 16, 2018
  • Regent Street EXPLODES in spectacular pyrotechnic display in front of crowd of thousands

    Regent Street EXPLODES in spectacular pyrotechnic display in front of crowd of thousands

    ormed Motown numbers from their blockbuster show.</p><p>The spectacular pyrotechnic display lit up the sky over Regent Street as revellers saw celebrities pressing the big button in London's West End tonight</p><p>Doing the honours with the big switch on were Jodie Whittaker, the first female Doctor from Doctor Who, and Heart Radio’s Breakfast presenters Jamie Theakston and Sian Welby. </p><p>Many families and tourists flocked to Regent Street to take a break from their Christmas shopping and join in the festive spirit.</p><p>After the entertainment the fun continued with handbag store, Kipling, providing a stage full of dancers and Kiehl's had a massive Christmas gift box.</p><p>Doctor Who's first female Doctor, Jodie Whittaker, is joined in doing the honour's by Heart Radio's Jamie Theakston and Sian Welby, singer Calum Scott and members of the West End musical, Dreamgirls</p><p>Thousands gathered in London's historic shopping street to witness the festive display, as the lights stretched across the broad Georgian facades</p><p>A triumphant angel in the 'Spirit of Christmas' display in London's West End overlooks thousands of festive revellers</p><p>Heart Radio's breakfast presenters Jamie Theakston and Sian Welby tonight before they took part in the switch on ceremony (left) and Britain's Got Talent singer Calum Scott performs (right)</p><p>The star studded line up wave to the cheering crowd after they have turned on the Christmas lights</p><p>L'Occitane were serving hot chocolates in a seated area with blankets, while soap store, Molton Brown, laid on a gigantic advent calendar.</p><p>Brass bands and other live performances, including from the London Gay Men's Chorus, continued providing entertainment into the night.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 November 16, 2018

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