Chris Christie being considered to replace Sessions as AG, report says

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Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is reportedly being considered as a replacement for ousted Attorney General Jeff Sessions, according to a report.

Two sources told CBS News that no decisions have been made yet and that the list could still grow.

Matthew Whitaker, chief of staff to Sessions, was named acting attorney general until a permanent replacement can be decided on.

Christie, a longtime friend of the president’s, endorsed Trump after dropping out of the 2016 presidential campaign. Christie also oversaw the transition process before Trump took office.

But their relationship has been complicated by the fact that Christie, while a U.S. attorney in New Jersey from 2002 to 2008, convinced real estate developer Charles Kushner to accept a plea deal on corruption charges in 2004. Kushner, now 64, is the father of the president's son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

Christie later served two terms as governor of New Jersey, from January 2010 to January 2018. He left the office because of the state's term-limit laws.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

 

November 09, 2018

Sources: Fox News

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