End of the bromance? Trump set to SNUB Macron’s peace summit in Paris 

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November 09, 2018

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  • As Thailand Prepares to Vote, the Likely Winner Is Clear. But the Aftermath Isn’t.

    As Thailand Prepares to Vote, the Likely Winner Is Clear. But the Aftermath Isn’t.

    r of Thailand, one of around 70 candidates for the job. She will not win.</p><p>That hasn’t stopped around 80 parties from running. Their aims are eclectic. Ms. Pauline’s party wants to represent not only transgender individuals like herself, but any Thai whose human rights have been compromised.</p><p>“People think of Thailand as a party place, so happy and nice for holiday, but we have a lot of problems with human rights that need to be solved with better government,” Ms. Pauline said in an interview.</p><p>Another major party, Bhumjaithai, which came in third in the last elections, has tied the nation’s future to the legal cultivation of marijuana. Its leader, Anutin Charnvirakul, says that Thailand’s soil is perfect for growing cannabis and that small-scale farming could bring each household an extra $13,000 a year — if people don’t hoard too much for their own recreational use.</p><p>There is a political party for defenders of Buddhism, and another with 15 candidates who all legally changed their names to those of the Shinawatra siblings, two popular former prime ministers whose governments were unseated by military coups.</p><p>Yet these diverse platforms and colorful candidates camouflage a darker truth: After years of delay by the junta, Thailand may at last be going through the rituals of democracy, but the elections are taking place in a much-diminished political landscape.</p><p>“Thailand is moving into a custodial democracy under long-term military supervision,” said Thitinan Pongsudhirak, a political scientist at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. “Anti-junta forces are likely to win the vote in the lower house, but because the Constitution is so stacked in the military’s favor, a junta-led coalition government is likely.”</p><p>Even pro-military Thais agree that Pheu Thai, a populist party affiliated with the Shinawatra family, will be the top vote-getter on Sunday, as were its sister parties in every previous election this century. But the junta’s Constitution ensures that the Senate is entirely appointed, and the prime minister does not need to be a sitting member of Parliament.</p><p>Given the constitutional limits, it is improbable that Pheu Thai will be able to form a government.</p><p>In addition, several other parties and their executives have court cases hanging over them that, after the election, could result in the dissolution of parties or jail time for their leaders.</p><p>“Nothing about this upcoming election is free and fair,” said Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit, the leader of the Future Forward Party, a new youth-focused party that has enjoyed a groundswell of online support in a country with some of the most active users of social media in the world.</p><p>In recent elections, only about one-third of Thais between the ages of 18 and 25 voted. But social media campaigns have energized the demographic, and more than 10 percent of the electorate is young.</p><p>Mr. Thanathorn, who has enjoyed strong crowd support during campaign stops, is facing computer crimes charges over a Facebook Live video in which, prosecutors say, he spread fake news. Human rights groups say the charges, which also have been made against Future Forward’s deputy leader and could involve prison time, have been trumped up in order to kneecap the party.</p><p>A decision in Mr. Thanathorn’s case could be made in the coming week.</p><p>Thailand has had a fractious relationship with democracy since absolute monarchy was outlawed nearly nine decades ago. The nation’s generals have staged more than a dozen successful coups, and the country has churned through 20 constitutions. The average prime minister’s tenure is less than three years.</p><p>For years, the nation has been bifurcated between elite urbanites, and debt-ridden farmers and factory workers, who have seen Thailand’s wealth gap grow under junta rule. A survey by Credit Suisse found that Thailand is the most unequal society on earth, beating out Russia and India, with 1 percent of the population controlling more than 65 percent of the wealth.</p><p>“In the past in Thailand, it has always been the rich who use their capital to take the profits from poor farmers, who accumulate debt to survive,” said Mr. Anutin of the Bhumjaithai Party, which is campaigning on agricultural reform, including cannabis production. “This cannot continue.”</p><p>Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, the head of the National Council for Peace and Order, as the junta is known, has been nominated to stay in his current job by a military-affiliated political party.</p><p>Mr. Prayuth is openly distrustful of some of the trappings of democracy. He has threatened, perhaps jokingly, to shoot journalists whose coverage he dislikes. Under junta rule, dissidents have been sent to detention camps for attitude adjustment. Cybercrime and sedition legislation has been used to target thousands of people who have spoken out against the junta and its limits on freedom of assembly and speech.</p><p>What may follow, instead, is a weak, fractious coalition. The Democrat Party, a long-established force that gave tacit support to the last coup, is angling for a major role in any coalition. It is likely to be among the top vote-getters on Sunday, winning support in its traditional urban and southern power bases.</p><p>But waiting in the wings, and even on the ballots, is the military. If anti-junta forces coalesce again, no one is discounting another putsch.</p><p>“Every time there’s a coup d’état, the country falls behind,” Mr. Thanathorn said. “This vicious cycle must be stopped.”</p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • States with the highest percentage of labor union members in the workforce

    States with the highest percentage of labor union members in the workforce

    n 2018, from 10.7 percent in 2017 to 10.5 percent. The decline is part of a much longer-term trend of the slow and steady disintegration of organized labor in the United States. In 1983, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 20.1 percent of American workers were union members.</p><p>Labor unions exist to increase the collective bargaining power of their members to negotiate higher wages and better benefits. And historically, they have done just that. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the typical non-union worker earns just under 80 percent of the wages of the typical unionized worker on a weekly basis. Labor unions have also helped to greatly improve benefits and reduce pay inequality along racial and gender lines.</p><p>While unions provide some benefits to workers, anti-union advocates argue that unions stifle economic growth, limit corporate competitiveness, and unfairly pass higher costs down to the consumer or taxpayer. They argue that states that have passed right-to-work legislation – laws that prohibit unions from requiring workers in certain trades to be due-paying members – are better states for business. Currently, 27 states have passed right-to-work laws.</p><p>Labor unions are an inherently political issue, and some states are more likely to be receptive to collective bargaining than others. 24/7 Wall St. reviewed data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to identify the states where union membership is the strongest and the weakest.</p><p>The public sector is much more heavily unionized than the private sector – 33.9 percent of public-sector workers are union members compared to 6.4 percent of those in the private sector. For this reason, states where government employment represents a larger share of total workers tend to have stronger overall union representation.</p><p>Based on figures published by Unionstats.com, an online union membership and coverage database, 24/7 Wall St. identified the states with the highest and lowest union membership as a percentage of total employment. The database, which analyzes Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey, provides labor force and union membership figures in both the public and private sectors. Annual average wages by state came from Bureau of Economic Analysis. Rates of change in union membership were calculated over the period of 2008 to 2018.</p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • Over-friendly lion mistakes 4x4 for one of his own pride and starts licking and nuzzling vehicle

    Over-friendly lion mistakes 4x4 for one of his own pride and starts licking and nuzzling vehicle

    cars for members of his pride as he cleans, prunes and protects them. </p><p>Shane the 15-year-old African lion shows his affection to larger cars in a similar way to how lions treat each other. </p><p>He is seen grooming, rubbing and licking them as though they are animals of the same size. </p><p>Shane the 15-year-old African lion shows his affection to larger cars in a similar way to how lions treat each other. He is seen grooming, rubbing and licking them as though they are animals of the same size </p><p>The conservation director at GG Conservation, Suzanne Scott, 50, said it was surprising to see the unusual behaviour but it makes her feel like 'part of his pride'. </p><p>Shane, from Harrismith, South Africa, cosies up to big cars as they drive through the reserve he lives on. </p><p>He looks completely relaxed as he rubs his face and mane against the cars while they stay still. </p><p>At one point he hooks his tail over the wing mirror and brushes up against the window.    </p><p>African lions are considered the most social of all the big cats and usually live in prides containing 10-15 others. </p><p>Lions are the only big cats which live in a group, which is like a family unit - made up of roughly three males, six females and some cubs. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • March for a Second Brexit Vote Is Just the Start for Young People

    March for a Second Brexit Vote Is Just the Start for Young People

    ing politics at the University of Cambridge in 2017, reading about the use of referendums as a way of settling political disputes. It was timely coursework: A year earlier, Britons had voted to leave the European Union.</p><p>But Ms. Spirit was growing alarmed at the omission of young people from the Brexit debate. Despite warnings in her readings about the risks of referendums, she delayed school and founded a group with other students to push for another public vote on Brexit.</p><p>They called it Our Future, Our Choice, and on Saturday it will be among a clutch of youth groups helping to lead an expected crowd of hundreds of thousands in a march on Parliament in support of a second referendum.</p><p>“We were sort of horrified that there hadn’t been a youth group that was a voice on the issue of Brexit,” Ms. Spirit, 22, said. “It will be my generation, of course, who will be making sense of this and dealing with the consequences of the decision we took in 2016.”</p><p>But the way many young people see it, the political chaos and dysfunction are working in their favor, with the anti-Brexit forces gaining momentum.</p><p>As Saturday’s march approached, students in Bath and Bristol bought seats on a chartered train to London. Others are coming on buses. And in student union buildings across the country, young people this week were gathering to paint banners and persuade their classmates to join them.</p><p>Brexit has molded their politics as decisively as the Iraq War did an older generation’s. Worried about a chaotic British exit without an agreement with the European Union, students said they view a second referendum as the only way out of the current impasse and a crucial step to protect gains on climate change and workers’ rights.</p><p>“It’s awoken a group of people who otherwise might not have been engaged,” said Sally Patterson, 23, an officer at the University of Bristol Students’ Union. “If you have a mate from Greece who might not be able to continue studying next year, you’ve got a stake in their future.”</p><p>The timing of the march — only six days before the original date of Britain’s departure from the European Union — once seemed risky. Surely, it seemed, politicians would have settled the matter by then.</p><p>James McGrory, the executive director of People’s Vote, the umbrella group that is organizing the march on Parliament, said the group’s leaders were originally dubious about pouring money and energy into a rally in late March. But younger organizers prevailed on them to hold it anyway.</p><p>“It was me and senior colleagues who hemmed and hawed, ‘Should we do one or not?’” Mr. McGrory said. “The two things young people in the campaign said were, ‘You should have the courage of your convictions — do it.’ The other thing is they thought we could raise the money online to pay for it.”</p><p>The most likely form it would take is a choice between the prime minister’s exit deal and remaining in the European Union. Many polls show that Britons have now gone from mostly thinking Britain was right to leave Europe after the 2016 referendum to mostly thinking the opposite.</p><p>With a following of hundreds of thousands of people on social media and email lists, Ms. Spirit’s group has invited young people to Parliament to petition their representatives and arranged for members of Parliament to visit schools to speak about Brexit. The group’s leaders have won big audiences on Twitter by posting video of encounters with pro-Brexit voters.</p><p>Along the way they have become valuable voices for an anti-Brexit movement that in 2016 was harmed by its association with the political class. (It was the Conservative prime minister at the time, David Cameron, who led the Remain campaign.)</p><p>“It’s more enjoyable to be the insurgents than the incumbents,” said Mr. McGrory, who is himself a veteran of the 2016 Remain campaign.</p><p>At Edge Hill University in northwest England, several dozen students were painting banners on Thursday in the students’ union bar. Among the anti-Brexit slogans: “Pulling Out Never Works.”</p><p>“It feels like an antithesis to the kind of bland politicians and political elite that are pushing Brexit,” Luke Myer, 24, vice president of the students’ union, said. “It’s real, and it’s irreverent as well. We like our memes and dumb slogans.”</p><p>Students said the atmosphere on campuses had seemed relatively dull in 2016, when the pro-Europe campaign stressed the potential economic problems if Britain left. Now, students are agitating about access to study abroad programs, research funding from Europe and the rights of their European classmates, said Shakira Martin, the president of the National Union of Students.</p><p>However sparse the support for a second referendum in Parliament, the campaigners may succeed in laying the groundwork for fights in the months and years ahead for a closer relationship with Europe, said Rob Ford, a professor of politics at the University of Manchester.</p><p>Just as the Labour government of Tony Blair was blamed for Britain entering the Iraq War, he said, it will be Mrs. May’s government that will bear the stain from Brexit.</p><p>“If you’re a student, the whole first 10 years of your working life are likely to be impacted to a greater or lesser extent by this Brexit debate,” Mr. Ford said. “It’ll be seen as something Conservatives initiated and presided over.”</p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • Meghan and Harry move to Frogmore Cottage Windsor 'delayed' over design changes

    Meghan and Harry move to Frogmore Cottage Windsor 'delayed' over design changes

    Cottage, Windsor, this week, but workmen are still on-site.</p><p>They could be waiting another four weeks, which would mean the heavily-pregnant Duchess would move in just days before giving birth.</p><p>Meghan, 37, and Harry, 34 (pictured at the Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abey on March 11) are believed to have delayed their move to Frogmore Cottage in Windsor as workmen are still carrying out last-minute design changes </p><p>The Frogmore Cottage (pictured) renovations have seen interior walls knocked down to create a five-bedroom property with en-suite bathrooms and a huge kitchen-diner space</p><p>'The word is they've been quite demanding, which is understandable as what homeowner doesn't want their house to be perfect?'</p><p>A Kensington Palace spokesman told MailOnline the couple are moving 'in the spring - hopefully before the birth' of the new royal baby, but would not comment further. </p><p>The Frogmore renovations have seen interior walls knocked down to create a five-bedroom property with en-suite bathrooms and a huge kitchen-diner space. </p><p>The royal couple have already moved out of their Kensington Palace cottage, sparking rumours of a rift between them and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.</p><p>Workmen are pictured on the roof of Frogmore Cottage making last-minute changes to the property ahead of the move </p><p>The latest reports claim the couple have been offered an apartment at Buckingham Palace in the interim after its £369million renovation.</p><p>They will be the first royals in recent history to go without a London base when they finally do make the move to Windsor.</p><p>When finished, the new-look Frogmore Cottage will have views of Windsor Great Park and Frogmore House, where the couple had their wedding reception last year.</p><p>It was confirmed this week the Duchess will give birth to her first baby on the Lindo Wing of St Mary's Hospital in London after reports she could break with tradition and choose another location.</p><p>It was suggested she would opt for the US-owned hospital The Portland or one closer to their new Windsor home such as Frimley Park Hospital in Surrey.</p><p>But a source told the Evening Standard yesterday: 'Having weighed up the options, and in acknowledgement of its place in royal tradition, they consider it the superior choice'.</p><p>A map shows where in Windsor the royal couple will be based </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • Cancer-stricken army major begs for daughter to be allowed to stay in Australia after diagnosis

    Cancer-stricken army major begs for daughter to be allowed to stay in Australia after diagnosis

    es to let his 29-year-old British daughter to stay in Australia while he fights a terminal cancer diagnosis.</p><p>Arthur Hall, 57, has called Australia home for more than a decade after he was offered a job to serve in the national army. </p><p>But the decorated war veteran, who has been diagnosed with incurable bone cancer, is battling with the Australian government to let his daughter, Jennifer, stay. </p><p>Mr Hall, who was awarded a Member of the Order of the British Empire from the Queen, spent 22 years serving for the UK armed forces before moving to Australia. </p><p>Australian citizen and army major Arthur Hall (left) is begging authorities to let his 29-year-old British daughter (right) to stay in Australia while he fights a terminal cancer diagnosis</p><p>The Australian Army called him explaining they needed aircraft engineers after they learnt he was leaving the British Army. </p><p>Mr Hall decided it was 'time to do the call of duty again' and moved to Australia with his then 13-year-old son Sam - who has since followed in his footsteps by serving in the army.</p><p>The father-and-son quickly received Australian citizenship while his then 16-year-old daughter Jennifer stayed in the UK to complete her studies. </p><p>After completing her education and becoming a qualified dental nurse, Jennifer decided she wanted to be in Australia with her brother and father. </p><p>Mr Hall, who was awarded a Member of the Order of the British Empire from the Queen (pictured), spent 22 years serving for the UK armed forces before moving to Australia</p><p>To stay in Australia, Jennifer began studying at the Canberra Institute of Technology on a Subclass 500 Student Visa in February 2017.</p><p>She completed a Certificate III in Business, Certificate III in Accounts Administration and a Certificate IV in Accounting, which she claims allowed her to further invest in her future as the qualifications are recognised in Australia.</p><p>Jennifer then applied for permanent residency but her request was declined.</p><p>'In June 2018, I submitted a request for Ministerial Intervention, asking the minister to grant me permanent residency so I could remain in Australia with my family,' she wrote.</p><p>'This request was declined by Minister David Coleman on February 28 2019, almost eight months later.'</p><p>After completing her education and becoming a qualified dental nurse, Jennifer (left) decided she wanted to be in Australia with her brother and father</p><p>'The letter received simply cited ''that it would not be in the public interest to intervene''.' </p><p>The terminal diagnosis of her father has left Jennifer more determined than ever to become an Australian resident. </p><p>Mr Hall said he felt he was having 'everything taken away' and wants nothing more than to have his daughter with him in Australia.</p><p>'I would be the proudest person ever to be able to say, I'm an Australian,' Jennifer told A Current Affair</p><p>'I'm 57 years old now. It'd mean more to me to have my daughter get her residency than for them to say to me, ''we've got a cure'',' he said. </p><p>'I'm coming to the end of my life, really, she's just in the beginning of hers.' </p><p>The family have launched a Change.org petition to rally support for Jennifer to stay in Australia.</p><p>The petition has a goal of 10,000 signatures and has already tallied more than 8,500.  </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • Man wanted in 2012 killing arrested over fraudulent $3 purchase

    Man wanted in 2012 killing arrested over fraudulent $3 purchase

    sion.</p><p>OGDEN, Utah — A suspect in a 2012 California killing is in jail following a fraudulent $3 purchase.</p><p>Cody Tripp, 33, was booked Wednesday in the Weber County Jail in Ogden, Utah, and is being held without bail, the Standard-Examiner reported on Thursday.</p><p>Tripp is the main suspect in the killing of 29-year-old Jordan Vigil, whose body was found in Tripp&#8217;s Castro Valley, California, home on May 14, 2012, authorities say.</p><p>Online records do not list an attorney for Tripp who could comment on the allegations.</p><p>Tripp is listed as one of the Alameda County sheriff&#8217;s office&#8217;s most wanted fugitives.</p><p>Finding Tripp after nearly seven years on the run all started with a fraud case regarding a $3.08 purchase at an Ogden store.</p><p>Ogden Police Detective Rachel Walker, who was assigned to the case, said Thursday she frequently investigates fraud cases, and treated the $3 case the same as she would for a much larger fraud case.</p><p>Walker found that a Sunset, Utah, homeowner, in the process of moving, suspected his credit cards were stolen by one of the people moving furniture. Walker said she began by asking the moving company for documentation for all the movers at the home.</p><p>Walker found an immigration card in those documents that she believed looked fraudulent. She was correct.</p><p>But Tripp is not in the United States illegally, Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman Carl Rusnok said.</p><p>Walker and other investigators utilized the department&#8217;s Area Tactical Analysis Center, which traced a phone number to an apartment in Salt Lake City.</p><p>Walker, another detective and an agent with the Immigrations and Customs Enforcement went to the apartment on Wednesday and confirmed Tripp&#8217;s identity. They also learned that Tripp was a homicide suspect. Police took Tripp into custody.</p><p>&#8220;This is a prime example of taking what appears to be a nothing case and digging to determine whether it is in fact a nothing case before moving on,&#8221; Ogden Police Chief Randy Watt said.</p><p>Tripp will be extradited to California in connection with Vigil&#8217;s death.</p><p> News Corp. is a network of leading companies in the world of diversified media, news, and information services. </p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • Trump administration to release 1,800 immigrants from detention in the next three days

    Trump administration to release 1,800 immigrants from detention in the next three days

    rm estimates or provide a number for how many would be released from the El Paso region, as it will be dependent on the number turned over by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.</p><p>Central American immigrants walk between a newly built Bollard-style border fence, left, and the older "legacy" fence after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico on February 1, 2019 in El Paso, Texas. The migrants later turned themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents, seeking political asylum in the United States</p><p>'The current volume of family units crossing the border – combined with limited transportation resources, time restrictions on families in government custody, and finite space at family residential centers – have all contributed to the current state of events,' ICE officials said in a statement.</p><p>'ICE is releasing families to (non-governmental organizations) that provide assistance with immediate basic needs such as temporary shelter, food, water, clothing and transportation services; however, many of these organizations are overwhelmed due to the ongoing influx of families at the border,' officials added.</p><p>The development follows news earlier this week that the Trump administration will stop detaining immigrant families who cross the border illegally in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas because the volume has surpassed officials' ability to safely keep them in jails.</p><p>Instead, starting this week, families in that region have been released on their own recognizance with a Notice to Appear in immigration court for deportation or asylum proceedings – a policy known as 'catch-and-release,' which Trump has vowed to end.</p><p>Department of Homeland Security officers patrol along the border fence separating US and Mexico in the town of El Paso, Texas in this February 2016 file photo</p><p>The goal is 'to mitigate risks to both officer safety and vulnerable populations under these circumstances,' a U.S. Customs and Border Protection official told DailyMail.com.</p><p>ICE released roughly 107,000 family members into the U.S. from December 21, 2018 – March 20. After they are released, adult immigrants are typically required to wear ankle monitors to track their location – a policy that doesn't apply to children.</p><p>'Our interior arrests have been affected because I have had to redirect' resources to address the 'alarming rate' of arrivals at the border, said Nathalie Asher, executive associate director of ICE's enforcement and removal operations, during a conference call with reporters.</p><p>ICE has three family detention centers - including two in Texas and one in Pennsylvania - which can hold thousands of people at any given time.</p><p>Under a federal agreement, ICE can detain families with children for up to 20 days.</p><p>A majority of the families are fleeing gang violence, poverty and corruption in the Northern Triangle region of Central America – Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.</p><p>Most have sought asylum in the U.S., saying they would face threats of violence and death if they returned to their home countries.</p><p>Salvadoran migrants wait for a transport to arrive after turning themselves into US Border Patrol by border fence under construction in El Paso, Texas on March 19, 2019</p><p>The process for seeking asylum often last years and many are ultimately unsuccessful. Some immigrants are allowed to live in the U.S. while awaiting their fate in court while others spend the time in detention centers.</p><p>Last year Trump sought to stem the tide of families coming across the border by implementing a controversial zero-tolerance policy that led to thousands of immigrant children being separated from their parents while both were detained for the misdemeanor of crossing the border illegally.</p><p>The actions sparked massive public outrage and multiple federal lawsuits, leading to Trump ending the policy through an executive order on June 20, 2018.</p><p>A federal judge also ordered the administration to reunite families – a slow process that is ongoing and hampered by many parents having been deported without their children.</p><p>More recently, the administration has begun to return some Central American migrants back to Mexico until a judge decides their case.</p><p>A mother and her son are given arm bands after turning themselves into US Border Patrol agents to claim asylum after crossing the Rio Grande in El Paso, Texas on March 19, 2019</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • Michael Daley's Democracy Sausage was topped with onions while Gladys Berejiklian’s were underneath

    Michael Daley's Democracy Sausage was topped with onions while Gladys Berejiklian’s were underneath

    closest in decades, social media has been divided over one very important issue - but it's not what you think. </p><p>More than four million people voted in the NSW state election on Saturday, but it wasn't who to choose as Premier that left people torn - but rather whose sausage sandwich was best.    </p><p>While voters everywhere enjoyed the Australian tradition of opting for a Democracy Sausage after casting their vote, the ritual has once again rehashed safety concerns. </p><p>NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian (pictured right) eats a sausage roll alongside Liberal candidate for East Hills Wendy Lindsay (left) during a visit to the Revesby Public School on Saturday</p><p>Last year, the issue of onions being a slip hazard caused national outrage when Bunnings introduced its sausage sizzle safety rules.</p><p>Under the controversial rules, those running charity BBQs were to serve onions underneath sausages so they didn't fall out and become a slipping hazard. </p><p>Both NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian and Opposition Leader Michael Daley enjoyed a snag on Saturday, but each had very different views on how it should be served.</p><p>Ms Berejiklian was first to share a pic of herself tucking into a snag at Willoughby Public School, in Sydney's north, along with the caption '#democracysausage time'. </p><p>She ordered her sausage with onions and barbecue sauce, and it wasn't long before social media users were quick to question where the onions had been placed. </p><p>Following her post, Twitter users were quick to slam the NSW premier for having onions on top of her sausage. </p><p>It has been confirmed that Ms Berejiklian's sausage was eaten with onions under the sausage </p><p>Opposition Leader Michael Daley found room to devour his sausage with: 'Onions on top'</p><p>'These two women have ONIONS ON TOP OF THE SANGER @Bunnings will be horrified,' one person wrote.  </p><p>Despite the backlash, it has since been confirmed Ms Berejiklian's sausage was eaten according to Bunnings' safety-first rules, with the onions being underneath.  </p><p>Mr Daley decided to cast his vote at Chifley Public School in Sydney's east, where he initially opted out of the Australian tradition and tucked into a meat pie instead.</p><p>One onions-on-top user tweeted: 'And to those voting in the NSW election today, it's vitally important that you remember, the onion goes on top of the sausage'</p><p>Another user who was against onions, tweeted: '#dogsatpollingstations with a side of #democracysausages served with onions on the bottom'</p><p>When he finally decided to partake and devour a sausage on two pieces of bread, he shared a pic of himself on Twitter, along with the cheeky caption: 'Onions on top'.</p><p>'Perfectly done,' one Twitter user replied to the Opposition Leader's post.</p><p>But it wasn't just the candidates who had a clear difference of opinion, with many social media users taking to Twitter to share pics of their preferred method.</p><p>One onions-on-top user tweeted: 'And to those voting in the NSW election today, it's vitally important that you remember, the onion goes on top of the sausage.'</p><p>Voters across New South Wales enjoyed a Democracy Sausage in the sunshine on Saturday ahead of an election that's tipped to be one of the closest in decades</p><p>Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison eats a sausage roll at the Sylvania Heights Public School, on 2019 New South Wales election day in Sydney</p><p> This person opted to have their Democracy Sausage served with controversial onions on top</p><p>Social media has been flooded with posts featuring #democracysausage as New South Wales residents hit the polling booths</p><p>All snags aside, Ms Berejiklian is on Saturday aiming to become the first popularly-elected female Premier in NSW history - and based on the latest polls, this is now a distinct possibility. </p><p>'It's going to be really really tight and I think today the people will decide for themselves but I don't want to see NSW go backwards,' she told Today.</p><p>'We're building for the future now, we've got a strong economy, we're helping taking pressure off families and that's where I want to see NSW [go] into the future.' </p><p>Voting was underway at Timbumburi Public School (pictured), the school was promoting the Democracy Sausage </p><p>NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian stuck with the Australian tradition by eating a sausage after casting her vote on Saturday</p><p>'(It was) easier 30 years ago when the voting patterns were different. People chop and change - that's not a bad thing. You have to work harder for that vote.' </p><p>Nearly 1.1 million people took advantage of early voting, with about one-in-five making their decision at pre-poll centres or via the post, internet or telephone.</p><p>A special Newspoll, published in The Weekend Australian, suggested the coalition is ahead of Labor 51-49 on a two-party preferred basis.</p><p>A similar result at the election would see Ms Berejiklian lose six seats, meaning she would need the support of at least one independent from the crossbench to form a government.</p><p>Michael Daley (pictured) partakes in a Democracy Sausage on Saturday after rising early to vote</p><p>Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison cooks sausages with daughter Lily (centre) alongside the NSW Liberal candidate for Miranda, Eleni Petinos at the Sylvania Heights Public School, on 2019 New South Wales election day</p><p>If the Coalition win on Saturday, it would be the first time since 1971 that a Liberal Party-led government in NSW had won a third consecutive term and Ms Berejiklian would become the first popularly elected female premier in NSW history.</p><p>The Newspoll showed the Coalition has lost support outside Sydney, with a six per cent slump in primary-vote support to 39 per cent, deadlocking it with Labor at 50-50 on a two-party-preferred basis.</p><p>Ms Berejiklian leads Labor leader Michael Daley 43 to 35 as preferred premier, but 22 per cent of voters remained uncommitted.</p><p>Mr Daley's disapproval rating rose nine points from 38 per cent to 47 and his satisfaction rating dropped five points from 37 to 32.</p><p>Voters got their hands on Democracy Sausages on offer across New South Wales on Saturday</p><p>Election day means Democracy Sausages in Australia and voters clambered to get their mouths around one on Saturday</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 March 23, 2019
  • Driver mounts concrete barrier on Sydney road  because he was trying to avoid paying a toll 

    Driver mounts concrete barrier on Sydney road because he was trying to avoid paying a toll 

    site side of a highway and mounting a concrete barrier in a bid to avoid paying a toll.</p><p>Frank Mollica, 47, drove his ute up the exit-ramp on the M5 highway near Hammondville in Sydney's south-west during peak hour traffic on Saturday morning.</p><p>After driving around 10kms into oncoming traffic, the brick-layer then scaled the concrete barrier trying to avoid another toll.</p><p>The silver Volkswagon ute suddenly tilted sideways before two of the wheels lifted into the air, leaving Mr Mollica airborne and stuck.</p><p>In an attempt to avoid tolls, a Sydney man mounted his silver Volkswagon ute onto a concrete barrier on the M5 highaway and drove onto oncoming traffic on Saturday morning  </p><p>Frank Mollica, 47, (pictured) said he drove his ute up the exit-ramp on the highway near Hammondville in Sydney's south-west during peak hour traffic and mounted his vehicle along the barrier</p><p>Despite the severity of the crash however, Mr Mollica, who lives in Georges Hall, appeared nonchalant. </p><p>He then said he had tried to mount the 'little bit in the middle' but it hadn't worked. </p><p>'I don't know how I got up here, I was trying to jump it really,' he said. </p><p>Mr Mollica said he had tried to mount 'the little bit in the middle' to avoid the oncoming toll but it hadn't worked </p><p>Traffic piled up around the incident, which Mr Mollica seemed unphased with creating</p><p>Inspector Phil Brooks from Highway Traffic and Control said it was one of the most 'grave and dangerous events' that they had seen in a very long time.</p><p>Mr Mollica also admitted to both police and reporters that he had taken illicit drugs before he got behind the wheel.</p><p>'[I've taken] a bit of speed in the last two days at a party,'.</p><p>Mr Mollica was arrested and taken to Bankstown Hospital where he underwent several blood and urine tests.</p><p>He is expected to face several traffic offences including dangerous driving.  </p><p>He also admitted to taking speed two days before jumping behind the wheel and was arrested by police at the scene - he is expected to face several traffic offences </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 March 23, 2019

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