Man's eyes, neck swell in bizarre reaction to hair dye

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

A man feared he was going blind after his head doubled in size when he had a bizarre extreme reaction to hair dye.

Bradley Reeson, 23, bought the bright red hair dye while on vacation in Egypt and applied it all over his short hair without doing a "patch" test.

A day later his face and neck started to swell up and itch until he could barely see out of his left eye.

Shocking photos show his usually slim face doubled in size, bizarrely swelling at the sides and around his eyes.

Reeson, from Manchester, was rushed to the hospital where doctors gave him an adrenaline injection in a bid to halt the swelling before his throat swelled up.

Embarrassed Reeson had to spend two weeks wearing a bandanna to cover his head until the swelling went down, and is now warning others of the dangers of PPD allergy.

The chemical - called paraphenylenediamine - is found in 90 percent of hair dyes and is also in henna tattoos.

"My head inflated to around double in size and I was unrecognizable," Reeson, a marketing executive, said. "At first I thought that everything was OK but then my neck started to itch. Before long, parts of my head and face then started to swell up especially around my left eye."

"It was very unpleasant and painful," he said. "It got to the point where I couldn't see through my left eye. I was extremely frightened at the time because I thought I was about to go blind."

Reeson bought the unknown brand of bright red hair dye from a supermarket in Sharm El Sheikh while on a four-week trip with his family in June 2011.

He was there with his mom Sue, 68, dad William, 68, and older brother, Luke, 24.

He applied it before going out for dinner and did not test it on a patch of his skin prior to use.

Reeson shaved off his hair hoping to halt the reaction, but it didn't help.

"It was just to prevent further swelling on my head which was painful. I looked like an army recruit," he said.

He was admitted to hospital where doctors said he was experiencing an allergic reaction to chemical PPD.

"I was shocked that I had an allergic reaction because I had never heard about it before," Reeson said. "I was discharged a few hours later after being injected with epinephrine which can relieve the symptoms of allergic reactions."

"After this, I was forced to stay indoors during the day because the doctors said that the swelling would get worse with the heat," he said. "When I went out in the evenings, I had to resort to wearing a bandanna to cover all of the red swelling on my head because it was so embarrassing.

"It was certainly a frightening experience but I now know of my allergy to PPD," Reeson said.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

 

December 05, 2018

Sources: Fox

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    1 December 14, 2018
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	Office worker with a 'bumpy' nose from two botched surgeries

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	Desperate mother fears for her daughter, 12, at risk of organ failure due to a phobia of  EATING

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She just constantly looks ill.'</p><p>It is sometimes confused with phagophobia, or the fear of swallowing.</p><p>As with many phobias, it is thought to be triggered by an event in childhood. </p><p>People with pseudodysphagia often have difficulty eating solid foods. </p><p>Anxiety and tension can cause throat muscles to constrict, which, ironically, can further increases the chance of choking. </p><p>Because it is a phobia, it is seen as a mental health problem, which may need therapy if methods such as chewing until food is mushy does not help the patient.</p><p>The phobia is associated with anxiety, depression, weight loss and panic attacks.</p><p>It is not clear how many people suffer with the phobia.  </p><p>The roots of Grace's condition are unclear, according to her mother and professionals. </p><p>Even though some nurses branded Ms Dawn a 'paranoid mother', several psychologists have suggested Grace suffers with pseudodysphagia - a chronic fear of choking.</p><p>But Ms Daw said nobody has come up with a solution. </p><p>She said: 'We're just not getting the help from professionals. I had a breakdown a couple of years ago because it was all getting a bit much.</p><p>'I'm working tireless to help save Grace only to watch her almost dying before my very eyes.</p><p>'I'm even studying to become a children's counsellor to try and help. 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It's the only thing she's ever known.'</p><p>Grace is fed through a tube straight into her tummy - called a mic-key - which was fitted when she was four months.</p><p>The type of feeding tube is used when a patient has a functioning gastrointestinal (GI) tract but cannot get enough nutrients by eating, therefore becomes at risk of malnutrition. </p><p>Ms Daw has spent years making daily visits to Grace's primary school in order to give Grace feeds via her mic-key, as she won't eat packed lunches or school dinners.</p><p>But with her daughter left out of birthday parties and sleepovers, Ms Daw decided to stop visiting when Grace started high school in September amid fears of bullying.</p><p>During the last two months Grace has lost half a stone, and doctors have said it is only a matter of time before her organs start failing, Ms Daw claims.   </p><p>'I'm working tireless to help save Grace only to watch her almost dying before my very eyes', Ms Daw says Grace always looks ill, weighing just four stone </p><p>Ms Daw hoped her babies eating problems would go away after the youngster had heart surgery at nine months old - doctors suspected a heart condition was causing her to choke</p><p>Grace's condition has baffled doctors, and Ms Dawn has said she has been called a 'paranoid mother' by nurses. She has taken the issue into her own hands to solve the problem </p><p>Grace's inability to keep food down started as a newborn when she would instantly throw up after breastfeeding or bottle feeds.</p><p>At risk, doctors put a feeding tube down Grace's throat so that she could be fed at such a crucial age.  </p><p>But Ms Daw claims the tube wasn't fitted properly, leaving her daughter 'frothing from the mouth', and with a life-long phobia of choking.  </p><p>She said: 'She just has this fear of choking which she's had since she was a few weeks old.</p><p>'During the first few weeks of her life she would projectile vomit after breastfeeding or bottle feeds so doctors decided to fit her with a feeding tube.</p><p>'But it was shoved down her and she was literally frothing from the mouth.</p><p>'I always thought that was a figure of speech until I saw it with my own eyes. 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It's called anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery, or ALCAPA for short. </p><p>Medical staff at the time said the condition was behind Grace's food and choking problems.</p><p>At nine-months-old she had open heart surgery, which gave her mother hope that her daughter would begin eating. </p><p>However, days after the eight-hour surgery, Mrs Daw noticed Grace still had no interest in eating. </p><p>Grace Daw has had a gastronomy feeding tube - a mic-key button - which feeds liquid food straight into her tummy, since she was four months old</p><p>Grace's condition affects the whole family, her mother, who has quite her job to care for her, has said. Pictured with her older sister Ellie, 16</p><p>Ms Daw has spent years making daily visits to Grace's primary school in order to give Grace feeds via her mic-key, as she won't eat packed lunches or school dinners</p><p>But 12 years later, Grace, who is now at secondary school, has not seen any developments, and doctors have been unable to remove the mic-key. </p><p>On a typical day, Grace will eat some ice-cream or yoghurt for breakfast, some pieces of pasta or half a bowl of soup for lunch, and 'only stuff that doesn't require chewing' for dinner.  </p><p>'She'll store it in her cheeks like a hamster. I've tried mimicking her at dinnertime but it's human instinct to swallow it. It's more hard work to keep it stored in your cheeks.</p><p>'She does okay with dissolvable foods - things like ice cream, yogurt, crisps - anything which doesn't require the effort of chewing.</p><p>'But even then it won't be a regular sized portion; it will be a handful of crisps or two spoonfuls of yogurt which will take over an hour to eat.</p><p>'If we mention taking out her mic-key she goes hysterical. It's now become so extreme, I've just hit a brick wall.'  </p><p>Ms Daw has made tireless efforts to improve her daughters outlook on food. </p><p>'I used to make tailor made portions for her for dinner but it would just be a waste of effort as she wouldn't eat it.</p><p>'Now I just give her a smaller portion of whatever I make everyone else.</p><p>'I stopped giving her toast in the morning. For ease I give her two small scoops of ice cream in the mornings but she'll only end up eating half.</p><p>'She uses every excuse there is when dinner is served. It'll be "I don't like this anymore", "I'm just going to the toilet" or "I'm feeling really sick".</p><p>'The school are aware of her condition and even make special portions for her. But say if they make a small bowl of pasta for her she will only eat six pieces.  </p><p>Ms Daw is now studying at college to try and solve the problem herself.   </p><p>'It's been a constant battle all her life to be heard. All they tell me to do is to up her night feeds as if that's a simple solution. </p><p>'I decided to sign up to the college course when Grace started high school in September as I was adamant I wouldn't go into the school to do feeds,' she said.</p><p>'I didn't want her to be labelled and bullied for something she obviously can't help.</p><p>'But when I'm doing the college work I feel like I don't have time for Grace so I feel like I've let her down.</p><p>'I'm studying hard so I can understand the eating phobia as nothing has worked for Grace. That's how desperate it's become.'</p><p>Christmas, a time with lots of food, will be hard for the family. Ms Dawn said Grace will put everything on her plate, but will mash it up, and then keep a mouthful in her mouth for 30 minutes. </p><p>'Last year I was over the moon because she ate two chocolates from her advent calendar', she said. </p><p>'It's not the ideal scenario but I don't think anyone understands how hard it is. </p><p>'This has a knock-on effect on my other kids too. I'm watching my family fall apart in front of my very eyes.' </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 14, 2018
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    1 December 14, 2018
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	Diabetes starts to SHRINK our brains in middle age, study suggests

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    1 December 14, 2018
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	Transformation of divorcee whose uneven breasts were turned symmetrical

    Transformation of divorcee whose uneven breasts were turned symmetrical

    failed plastic surgeries has undergone an incredible transformation.</p><p>Hope, whose last name is unknown, was devastated after being left with an uneven chest following the procedures. </p><p>Her right breast was left higher than the left and with part of her nipple missing, while the left felt hard to touch and was heavily scarred. </p><p>But, despite feeling she had been left with 'no hope', the divorcee now has a symmetrical chest after going under the knife on the E! reality series Botched.  </p><p>Hope sought help from doctors on the TV show Botched after four operations to improve her breasts went wrong</p><p>In the programme, which aired in the US last night, she explained how her right breast was 'extremely high', compared to her left</p><p>Hope sought help from doctors on the TV show Botched after four operations to improve her breasts went wrong.</p><p>In the programme, which aired in the US last night, she explained how her right breast was 'extremely high', compared to her left.</p><p>Hope, whose age is also unknown, feared that her chest would never be fixed and admitted she had 'no hope'. </p><p>But after the surgery, which Dr Terry Dubrow said was complicated, she spoke of her happiness that her breast were symmetrical. </p><p>He warned the chances the revision procedure could work were low and that the risks of a complication were 'high'.</p><p>Hope, whose age is also unknown, feared that her chest would never be fixed and admitted she had 'no hope'</p><p>But after the surgery, which Dr Terry Dubrow said was complicated, she spoke of her happiness that her breast were symmetrical</p><p>Dr Dubrow decided that he needed to try a 'unique solution' in order to fix Hope's uneven breasts, E News reports</p><p>Dr Dubrow warned the chances the revision procedure could work were low and that the risks of a complication were 'high'</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 14, 2018
  • 
	Scientist whose cancer was dismissed as jet lag during a holiday to Disney World is in remission

    Scientist whose cancer was dismissed as jet lag during a holiday to Disney World is in remission

    she started to feel unwell while on holiday in Disney World, Orlando. </p><p>Claire Daly, 34, was just days into the three-week break with her husband Matt, 43, in September 2015 when she became fatigued and under the weather.</p><p>But when her symptoms became intolerable and forced her to return to the hospital just days later, she was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia and told she would have just weeks to live unless she started treatment immediately.</p><p>Mrs Daly was rushed back to the UK where she endured three rounds of grueling chemotherapy and was forced to have a bone marrow transplant in March 2016.   </p><p>Now in remission, Mrs Daly has even become close friends with her 'DNA sister', 22-year-old bone-marrow donor Imogen Riddett.</p><p>Claire Daly claims her cancer was dismissed as jet lag after she started to feel unwell while on holiday in Disney World, Orlando. Pictured on the first day of the three-week break on September 13 2015, Mrs Daly started to feel tired and lethargic within days of the trip</p><p>After being sent home from hospital, Mrs Daly returned just days later when she became more fatigued. A blood test revealed her white blood cell count was abnormally a high - a sign of leukaemia. Mrs Daly is pictured receiving treatment in hospital in the UK on March 29 2016</p><p>After enduring three rounds of chemotherapy, which left her nauseous and caused her hair to fall out, Mrs Daly then had to have a bone marrow transplant to reboot her immune system. Now in remission, Mrs Daly is pictured at home in Coventry yesterday with her husband Matt</p><p>The couple decided to treat themselves to a break in Orlando after moving back to the UK from Australia, where they had been living for four years. </p><p>Mr Daly, an events organiser, said: 'We were both hugely excited by the holiday as 2015 had been a long year with our move back to the UK and it was nice to go somewhere where we knew we'd be able to rest and unwind.' </p><p>The pair, who married in 2012, hoped to have a relaxing three-week break, but Mrs Daly began to feel tired and lethargic shortly after landing, and started to struggle to get out of bed. </p><p>'At first, I just shrugged it off as very bad jet lag,' Mrs Daly said. 'Matt had jet lag too but he got better and I didn't.</p><p>'I just felt really tired, I didn't really have any appetite and had a lot of pain.'</p><p>Despite her symptoms, Mrs Daly decided to push on and try to enjoy the break.</p><p>'I forced myself to go on rides and go for meals but I'd only have a couple of mouthfuls,' she said. </p><p>'We'd go to Disneyland or Universal Studios but we'd have to go home after just a few hours because I felt so tired.'</p><p>Mrs Daly has since become close friends with her bone-marrow donor 22-year-old Imogen Riddett. The pair are pictured together in June this year after a meeting was arranged by the leukaemia charity Anthony Nolan. They call each other their 'DNA sister'</p><p>Mrs Daly decided she had to see a doctor when she woke up one morning and could barely bring herself to get out of bed. </p><p>'They gave me painkillers and the doctor said that I was just under the weather coupled with the jet lag,' she said. </p><p>'They told me to see how I was after the weekend. We went back on the Monday because I couldn't get out of bed.'</p><p>Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a type of blood cancer that starts in young white blood cells in the bone marrow.</p><p>AML affects around one in 200 men and one in 255 women in the UK at some point in their lives.</p><p>Approximately 19,500 new cases occur every year in the US. </p><p>AML's exact cause is unclear, however, risks include: </p><p>AML is usually treated via chemotherapy. A bone marrow or stem cell transplant may be required.</p><p>Mrs Daly had a blood test, which revealed her white blood cell count was abnormally high - a key sign of leukaemia. </p><p>'I'd put it to the back of my mind, so to find out that it was cancer was horrendous,' she said. </p><p>'It was very surreal for us both. There were no words for something like that.'</p><p>Despite the diagnosis being devastating, the couple were grateful Mrs Daly's cancer had been caught early enough for her to stand a chance at beating it. </p><p>'When Claire was diagnosed, doctors told us her acute myeloid leukaemia had grown very fast,' Mr Daley said. 'They said she needed to start treatment as soon as possible otherwise she could only have had a few weeks.' </p><p>Mrs Daly flew home for chemo, which left her nauseous and caused her hair to fall out.  </p><p>'After the first round I was told it hadn't worked, but I tried to remain as upbeat as possible,' she said.</p><p>She even got to meet her donor in June 2018 after it was organised by the leukaeama charity Anthony Nolan. </p><p>'The first time I met her it was hugely emotional,' Mrs Daly. 'We thought we'd be there for a few hours but we there till 11pm in the evening, we had a lot to talk about. We've become very close.</p><p>'It's very strange knowing someone else is part of you in this way. We say we're DNA sisters and she's part of my family.</p><p>'We always end up talking about it. It's nice to talk about our difference experiences and from different perspectives.</p><p>'It's brought us all together, she gave me the gift of life. I wouldn't be here without her. There's nothing I could ever do to repay her.' </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 14, 2018
  • 
	Touching video reveals paralysed man, 24, laughing with his mother during their morning routine

    Touching video reveals paralysed man, 24, laughing with his mother during their morning routine

    e of a man who became paralysed after breaking his neck when he jumped into the sea.</p><p>Zack Collie, 24, suffered the life-changing injury nine years ago when he was 15 and now requires help with everything in his day-to-day life.</p><p>Despite regaining small amounts of movement in his arms and legs, Mr Collie is too weak to hold everyday objects and can't move his own bodyweight.</p><p>Both Mr Collie and his mother can be seen laughing and hugging in the time-lapse video showing them getting him out of bed, showered and dressed for the day.</p><p>The emotional video shows Mr Collie and his mother, Amber, laughing and smiling together as they get him out of bed, showered and ready for the day</p><p>Although Mr Collie, from Newport Beach in California, is now a C-4 quadriplegic and admits he is living trapped in 'a body that no longer works', he said he loves his life.</p><p>'My life has been very difficult since my accident,' he said. 'When I was first injured, I had no movement below my neck. I could not raise my hand to itch my face.'</p><p>'I could no longer feed myself, take a shower on my own, shave, dress, do my hair, brush my teeth and much more.</p><p>'I was now entirely dependent on others taking care of me so that I could have a decent quality of life. I felt hopeless and discouraged about my life.</p><p>'Fully dependent on other is not how I wanted to live, especially for the rest of my life.</p><p>'But now I love my life. I have accomplished more right now than I would have in my entire previous life.'</p><p>In the footage, Mr Collie's parents Amber, 46, and Adron, 48, help him get out of bed and his mother helps him shower, brush his teeth, get dressed and style his hair.</p><p>Every movement looks difficult for the pair of them but they both appear to smile and laugh throughout, embracing in a loving hug at the end.</p><p>Mr Collie's mother and his father, Adron, lift him out of bed in the morning into a wheelchair so he can go to the bathroom, brush his teeth and shower. The 24-year-old has regained some movement in his arms and legs since the accident but is too weak to lift himself</p><p>Mr Collie's mother helps him shower in the intimate video which gives a behind-the-scenes look at the life of the 24-year-old, whose life was changed forever after a swimming accident eight years ago</p><p>A C-4 spinal cord injury is one of the most severe types of injuries to the spine.</p><p>It involves damage to the area around the fourth vetebra from the skull, and causes paralysis in the arms, legs and trunk. </p><p>Paralysis is caused by damage to the nerves, which are fibres carrying electrical signals from the brain to the muscles around the body and control everything movement and sensation.</p><p>When the nerves are damaged – either bruised, cut or completely severed – parts of the body stop working, and it can take years to recover, or they may never recover at all.</p><p>C-4 paraplegics need assistance with daily activities because, even if they regain some movement, they will likely be unable to carry out normal tasks without help.</p><p>Mr Collie lost all movement from his neck down after injuring his spine when he jumped into the ocean as a teenager.</p><p>He and his friends were running towards the sea and, when Mr Collie dived into an oncoming wave, hit a sandbar headfirst despite having his hands out in front of him.</p><p>He had dived into the sea 'hundreds of times before', Mr Collie said, but this time it went horribly wrong.</p><p>'Instantly after the impact my whole body went numb and tingly similar to when your arm falls asleep,' he said.</p><p>'In a split second, I went from being able to move every muscle in my body to moving nothing.</p><p>'I knew my friends would think I was messing around and by the time they realised something serious had happened, by then I would have already inhaled water.</p><p>'But my friend ran over to me and flipped my body, so my face was out of the water.</p><p>'He pulled my body out of the water and my friends who didn’t know the magnitude of the incident thought I was playing a prank on them. My arms just fell to the ground as if they were not a part of my body.'</p><p>Mr Collie said that although being fully dependent on others for everything was not how he ever envisaged spending his life, he is happy and loves his life and his family</p><p>The video shows intimate aspects of Mr Collie's life, including him having to attach a catheter (pictured) before he leaves the house in the morning</p><p>Mr Collie has now moved out of his parents' house and lives with a carer.</p><p>He said the accident transformed him from a 'typical' selfish teenager into a man who loves and cares for his family.</p><p>Mr Collie said: 'I have grown so much from this injury and it is the reason why I am the person I am today. It changed my heart and made me realise I want to help others.</p><p>'Growing up, I did not have a good relationship with my family. I was the typical 15-year-old teenager that only cared about himself.</p><p>'After my accident the relationship with my family did a full 180. This accident brought me closer to my siblings and parents.</p><p>'This injury has matured me in ways I never would have if it didn’t happen.'</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 14, 2018
  • 
	Non-medicinal options advised to soothe teething babies

    Non-medicinal options advised to soothe teething babies

    permarket shelves after health officials said there was little evidence they worked.</p><p>From January 1 all teething gels for babies containing lidocaine - a mild local anaesthetic - will only be available from behind pharmacy counters.</p><p>Until now the products, which include Bonjela and Calgel teething gels, have been available from garages, supermarkets and corner shops.</p><p>But a review by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has ruled that should change from next year.</p><p>From January 1 all teething gels for babies containing lidocaine - a mild local anaesthetic - will only be available from behind pharmacy counters (Bonjela can contain lidocaine)</p><p>The investigation was prompted by a warning issued by the US Food and Drug Administration, which found a lidocaine solution used as a pain reliever on teething babies' gums could cause seizures and deaths.</p><p>The MHRA stressed products in the UK are far weaker than in the US, and carry a very small risk of side effects.</p><p>They found only 447 reports of lidocaine poisoning to children had been made over a three-year period to the UK National Poisons Information Service - of which 437 caused 'minor' or 'no' harm, and the remaining ten were 'unknown'.</p><p>But their review also found a 'lack of evidence of benefit' from the products.</p><p>Officials said they should only be used as a second-line treatment, after attempting other methods to ease a babies' pain, such as giving them cooled teething rings to chew.</p><p>The review said pharmacists should discuss these issues with parents before selling them the products.</p><p>Teething rings are a good option to help reduce inflammation, experts say </p><p>Most babies start teething by around the time they turn six months. However, some are born with their first teeth. </p><p>your baby's gum is sore and red where the tooth is coming through</p><p>Plastic teething rings - which are on sale at the supermarket and pharmacists - can be helpful, particularly when it comes to sore gums.</p><p>Rubbing their gums with a clean finger or moistened gauze pad can also ease their pain.</p><p>Giving your baby a dummy might also help, as they can use it to soothe themselves.</p><p>It added: 'Oral lidocaine teething products were authorised before current, more rigorous standards for demonstration of safety and efficacy of paediatric medicines.</p><p>'Although many of these products have been licensed and marketed for a long time, high-quality clinical data supporting their efficacy in teething are not available.'</p><p>Dr Sarah Branch, deputy director of MHRA's vigilance and risk management of medicines division, said: 'Our review showed there is a lack of evidence of benefit to using teething gels.</p><p>'To help babies and children with teething, parents and caregivers should try non-medicine options such as rubbing or massaging the gums or a teething ring.</p><p>'We want to make sure you get the right information about teething. If your child continues to have problems with teething, talk to your pharmacist or healthcare professional about the best options.'</p><p>Ash Soni, president of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, said: 'It's natural for parents to be concerned if their baby is experiencing discomfort with sore gums when teething.</p><p>'It's advised that you give a teething baby something to chew on like a teething ring that's been in the fridge, but if that isn't enough then your pharmacist can give you expert advice about using a teething product containing lidocaine and how to use it safely.'</p><p>Dr Cheryll Adams, executive director of the Institute of Health Visiting, added: 'Teething is a normal process, alongside some resultant pain, however this can prove distressing for the baby and its parents.</p><p>'Parents should talk to their health visitors if they are concerned that their baby is overly distressed, but their first action should be to offer the baby a cold teething ring, or similar, to bite on to relieve their discomfort and/or to massage the baby's gums with a clean finger.</p><p>'If this isn't effective and the baby is persistently distressed, then they can speak to a pharmacist who may feel that it's appropriate to offer a pharmaceutical treatment.'</p><p>Reckitt Benckiser, which makes Bonjela, did not respond to a request for comment.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 14, 2018
  • 
	Woman in her 60s who fell asleep during home cupping therapy woke up with large blisters

    Woman in her 60s who fell asleep during home cupping therapy woke up with large blisters

    ulder fell asleep and woke up with large, painful blisters.</p><p>But she fell asleep for half an hour, resulting in the uncomfortable blisters to form in a circle on her shoulder.</p><p>A Californian woman in her 60s who used cupping therapy to for her injured shoulder fell asleep and woke up with large, painful blisters, a report in the journal JAMA Dermatology said </p><p>Cupping comes from ancient Chinese medicine, and involves putting cups, sometimes hot, on the skin to create a vacuum.</p><p>Some believe it helps with pain relief by increasing blood flow to the area, with celebrities such as Gwyneth Paltrow and Anthony Joshua having used it.</p><p>Despite common side effects including bruising, cupping therapy is generally believed to be safe if done by a therapist.</p><p>However, the unfortunate story of this woman in her 60s, told in a report in the journal JAMA Dermatology, reveals it can be quite dangerous.</p><p>The collection of blisters formed in a circle under the area where the cup was applied, doctors at the University of California, San Francisco, revealed.</p><p>The suction, which the woman hoped would relieve her of her shoulder pain, damaged her skin, explained the team of doctors, led by Dr Maria Wei.</p><p>'The vacuum was strong enough to split the skin, separating the normal two [top and bottom] layers of skin,' the case report read.</p><p>Celebrity fans of this form of acupuncture include Gwyneth Paltrow - who arrived at a New York premiere in 2004 showing off the tell-tale circular bruises </p><p>Athletes have been known to use the ancient Chinese method to relieve pain by improving blood flow. Michael Phelps appeared with red circles caused by the therapy all over his shoulder in the 4x100m freestyle relay in the 2016 Olympics at Rio de Janeiro</p><p>Doctors in China were shocked to discover an elderly man's lung had seemed to disappear in an X-ray scan.</p><p>The patient was apparently feeling unwell and had to be taken to the hospital after having cupping therapy.</p><p>Doctors later claimed that the patient's right lung had collapsed and he had to undergo surgery.</p><p>According to Kan Kan News, the patient, Mr Wu, has had bronchitis for over 10 years.</p><p>It's reported that his wife gave him a cupping session at home in Wuhan, Hubei Province on November 7.</p><p>However, he appeared pale after the session and had to be taken to the Wuhan Central Hospital.</p><p>Dr Xu Di, a specialist of cardiothoracic surgery, said 70 per cent of Mr Wu's right lung had been compressed.</p><p>The painful blisters were drained and the 'blister roof was left to serve as a natural dressing', before petroleum jelly was applied under a sterile dressing.</p><p>Cupping has proven popular among celebrities and athletes over the years.</p><p>Fans of this form of acupuncture including Geri Haliwell, Paris Hilton and Gwyneth Paltrow - who arrived at a New York premiere in 2004 showing off the tell-tale circular bruises, caused by small blood vessels bursting. </p><p>Interest in cupping soared when Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps appeared with the red circles all over his shoulder in the 4x100m freestyle relay in Rio de Janeiro, August 2016. </p><p>Recently, Strictly Come Dancing star Gorka Marquez, 28, shared his experiences of cupping, which he gets for neck and lower back injuries, on Instagram.</p><p>British heavyweight boxer Anthony Joshua also shared a clip of him receiving 'fire cupping' last year in preperation for a clinch fight with Wladimir Klitschko.</p><p>He was laden with suction cups which were lit in turn before being placed on his back and arms, creating the 'healing' vacuum on the skin.</p><p> Cupping involves creating suction through a vacuum on the skin </p><p>But in this case, the device was left unsupervised, causing 'too strong of a vacuum' and damaging the skin.</p><p>Dr Wei said: 'This case illustrates the need for supervision while performing cupping with a mechanical device [such as a pump]. If properly monitored, it shouldn't be a problem.'</p><p>Although many people say they've experienced benefits from the therapy, there is little scientific evidence to back its use.</p><p>Critics have said the method is nothing other than a celebrity fad, and that it works for no reason other than the placebo effect. </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 14, 2018

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