Florida veteran dies after genitals become gangrenous; family blames nursing home: report

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

An 84-year-old Army veteran in Jacksonville, Florida, died after he reportedly developed a gangrene infection in his genitals. Now his family members allege the nursing home where the veteran lived ignored his condition until it was too late.

The doctor "said he had never seen anything like that before, especially in this day and age,” Derwin Spratling, the veteran's nephew,  told the Naples paper. “It really freaked us out.”.

The man died shortly after the surgery, according to the newspaper.

Staffers at the nursing home reportedly told state investigators they “could smell [his ] infection from the door to his room,”  the newspaper reported, citing reports. But despite the stench, the staff did not document the infection or tell a doctor until five days later, the newspaper said.

The veteran was allegedly not being bathed, though nursing home staff claimed that Spratling refused showers.

“It’s way past obvious. This is so past obvious that it’s mind-blowing,” Derwin Spratling said of his uncle’s condition.

“His private area, nobody washed that,”  Lula Price-Brown, Spratling's sister, told The Naples Daily News.

“Who was taking care of this man?” she added.

Investigators later concluded the man’s death was “due to inadequate supervision and medical neglect,” The Naples Daily News reported.

Despite the findings, however, there has reportedly been no action taken against the nursing home by the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), a state agency that regulates nursing homes in Florida, according to the newspaper.

What's more, the investigation into Spratling's condition came after AHCA had cited Consulate Health Care three times in the year before the vet's death, claiming the nursing home did not have “enough nurses to properly care for residents, including showering them,” the newspaper reported.

It was not immediately clear if Spratling's family plans to take legal action.

Consulate Health Care did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment on Saturday.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

 

December 15, 2018

Sources: Fox

Related news

  • Perdue recalls gluten-free chicken nuggets after reports of wood in product

    Perdue recalls gluten-free chicken nuggets after reports of wood in product

    ritten, or redistributed. ©2019 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes. </p><p>&#x201C;The problem was discovered when the firm received three consumer complaints that wood was found in the product,&#x201D; the news release said. &#x201C;A complaint was also reported to FSIS&#x2019; consumer complaint monitoring system. FSIS was notified by the firm on Jan. 17. 2019.&#x201D;</p><p>While there have been no adverse reactions reported, consumers are urged to discard the product or returned for a refund. Those with questions are directed to contact Perdue Consumer Care.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Mother has an orange-sized cyst on her head drained by Dr Pimple Popper

    Mother has an orange-sized cyst on her head drained by Dr Pimple Popper

    various growths, cysts and spots, and the latest story did not disappoint. </p><p>A mother who had to wear a hat to hide her orange-sized cyst on her head had it drained of yellow liquid by the dermatologist.</p><p>Irais, whose surname is unknown, came to Dr Sandra Lee with what the doctor described as a 'serious fatty bump on her head'.</p><p>The huge bump oozed a runny substance when it was cut into, leaving Irais with a lack of self-confidence.</p><p>A mother has had her orange-sized cyst on her head has drained of yellow liquid by Dr Pimple Popper in the latest episode </p><p> Irais, whose surname is unknown, has had to wear bandannas and hats to cover her growth</p><p>Millions of viewers love to watch as Dr Sandra Lee, AKA Dr Pimple Popper, (pictured) oozes puss from various growths, cysts and spots </p><p>It had started as a zit, Irais, who lives in Laguana Hills, California, explained, but had soon grown to almost the same size as her hand</p><p>The episode was the third in the latest season, titled 'The Last Unicorn'. It featured three patients all suffering with similar growths.</p><p>Spanish-speaking Irias, from Mexico, came to see Dr Lee with her cousin Gil, from Acapulco, who translated her story for the viewers.</p><p>'Like many of us, she is here for the American Dream,' she said.</p><p>But her dreams were being held back by the sack-like bulge on her scalp. Gil said: 'At first, she thought it was just a zit.</p><p>'It just kept growing and growing. She hasn't been able to save money to see a doctor because she has to buy the essentials for her young daughters.'</p><p>Irais is forced to wear a hat or bandanna to hide the lump, causing serious issues with her self-confidence.  </p><p>Dr Lee assumes the lump is a pilar cyst because they normally grow on the scalp. </p><p>They can occur after a hair follicle has been inflamed, so they are common in acne. They are also hereditary. </p><p>The following gruesome scenes showed the bump start to ooze a strange, runny bright-yellow liquid when she sliced into it.</p><p>Dr Lee believes the lump was a pilar cyst because they normally grow on the scalp, calling it a 'serious fatty bump'</p><p>The lump starts to ooze out runny yellow liquid when Dr Lee slices into it </p><p>Dr Lee manages to remove the full, tumour-like scalp growth </p><p>Irais, who came to the US for the 'American dream' said her confidence had been effected</p><p>Epidermoid and pilar cysts are common, not cancerous, harmless and not contagious. </p><p>Epidermoid cysts affect young and middle aged adults. They can come up after a hair follicle has been inflamed, so they are common in acne.</p><p>Pilar cysts affect women more often than men, and tend to come up in middle age.</p><p>They run strongly in families, being inherited as an autosomal dominant trait - which means that there is a 1 in 2 chance that each child of an affected parent will inherit the condition.</p><p>Both types grow slowly. Some become infected. They may then discharge cheesy foul-smelling pus.</p><p>They are round, sometimes dome-shaped bumps, lying just under the skin surface.  </p><p>A small dark plug is often present, through which it may be possible to squeeze out the contents. </p><p>The cysts range in size from those that are smaller than a pea to those that are several centimeters across.</p><p>Dr Lee managed to remove the full, tumour-like growth, and was delighted Irais' head returned to normal.</p><p>Irais, who was overcome with emotion, said: 'I want to show off my hair because now I am pretty.'</p><p>Dr Lee began documenting her procedures on social media, and soon gained popularity as millions of viewers found satisfaction in the popping.</p><p>American exotic dancer Yamileth, 22, showed the dermatologist a large itchy bump on her collarbone, 'the size of an avocado', which had been there since she was 10. </p><p>Yamileth revealed that it had prevented her from pursuing her dreams of becoming a backing dancer and saw her bullied at school.</p><p>She said: 'It has really affected me and my studies.'</p><p>In a shocking clip, Dr Lee sliced into the cyst before it releases a stream of thick, yellow puss. </p><p>Yamileth, from the US, appeared on Dr Pimple Popper with a large itchy cyst on her collarbone, which has prevented her from pursuing her dreams of becoming a backing dancer</p><p>Before: In emotional scenes, Yamileth explains how she got bullied: 'This kid would say 'argh that's nasty. That's disgusting'</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Frail older people are at greater risk of getting dementia, even when their brains are healthy

    Frail older people are at greater risk of getting dementia, even when their brains are healthy

    a, even when their brains are relatively healthy.  </p><p>A study of more than 450 older people found the most frail were most in danger of the memory-robbing disease.</p><p>Those with low levels of the proteins which build up in the brain and cause dementia are the lucky ones who should be spared from the disease.</p><p>But just over one in ten people in the study were diagnosed with dementia despite having a relatively healthy brain.</p><p>Becoming frail in later life may make people more vulnerable to even the slightest brain changes that cause Alzheimer's disease, Canadian researchers found</p><p>The answer to why people with apparently healthy brains get dementia appears to be their physical health.</p><p>More than two-thirds of people with fairly healthy brains who got dementia were highly frail, compared to just five per cent of very fit pensioners.</p><p>Experts now believe frailty could reduce people's tolerance to brain changes, so that they are more likely to become forgetful. </p><p>It could see older people advised to exercise more and change their diet to make them stronger.</p><p>Professor Kenneth Rockwood, who led the study from Dalhousie University in Canada, said: 'People with more frail bodies are more likely to have frail brains, which make it harder to resist the proteins that we know cause Alzheimer's disease.</p><p>'This explains why frail people could develop dementia when less frail people with exactly the same build-up of proteins in their brains may have far fewer symptoms and never be diagnosed with dementia at all.'</p><p>Scientists have puzzled for decades over why people with little sign of dementia in their brains are diagnosed with it anyway.</p><p>To determine the importance of frailty, researchers monitored older people's self-reported health, walking speed, grip strength and balance. </p><p>People's ability to do simple daily activities like dressing themselves, shopping and preparing meals were assessed.</p><p>Health problems like cancer, high blood pressure and osteoporosis were also taken into account among 41 total measures combined in a 'frailty score'.</p><p>Study participants were all dementia-free when the study started, with 53 per cent diagnosed with probable or possible Alzheimer's disease by its end. </p><p>Their brains were examined after their death for levels of amyloid and tau - the proteins which build up in the brain and damage the links between brain cells to cause dementia.</p><p>The results show 50 people out of the 456 in the study had Alzheimer's disease despite few brain changes. </p><p>These people had far worse scores for frailty, even when other health problems like heart failure and stroke were taken into account.</p><p>People who were frail were most at risk of Alzheimer's disease, and most at risk of the brain changes which cause it too.</p><p>The hope for people at risk of dementia is that staying fit could protect against it, as people who were less frail were more likely to escape dementia despite having signs of it in their brains.</p><p>Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of neurological disorders</p><p>Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of progressive neurological disorders, that is, conditions affecting the brain.</p><p>There are many different types of dementia, of which Alzheimer’s disease is the most common.</p><p>Some people may have a combination of types of dementia.</p><p>Regardless of which type is diagnosed, each person will experience their dementia in their own unique way.</p><p>Dementia is a global concern but it is most often seen in wealthier countries, where people are likely to live into very old age.</p><p>The Alzheimer’s Society reports there are more than 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK today, of which more than 500,000 have Alzheimer's.</p><p>It is estimated that the number of people living with dementia in the UK by 2025 will rise to over 1 million.</p><p>In the US, it's estimated there are 5.5 million Alzheimer's sufferers. A similar percentage rise is expected in the coming years.</p><p>As a person’s age increases, so does the risk of them developing dementia.</p><p>Rates of diagnosis are improving but many people with dementia are thought to still be undiagnosed.</p><p>But new drugs can slow down its progression and the earlier it is spotted the more effective treatments are.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Violent action films DON'T cause more violence among teenagers, say psychiatrists  

    Violent action films DON'T cause more violence among teenagers, say psychiatrists  

    agers, according to a new study that claims there is no link between rises in crime and onscreen acts.</p><p>Researchers cross-referenced films that depicted violence and crime rates and found no evidence that violence in society was caused by PG-13 rated movies.</p><p>The findings come just days Britain's ratings body ruled that under-15s would no longer be able to see films that depict rape and other sexual violence. </p><p>It had been thought that violent scenes in movies and TV were becoming increasingly gruesome.</p><p>There has been widespread speculation that each generation of viewers become desensitised to onscreen violence which, in turn, fuels crime and murder.</p><p>A new study looking at the on screen depiction of guns and gun crime rates found no effect on violence in society by PG-13 rated movies, equivalent to the UK's 12A. </p><p>A new study looking at the on screen depiction of guns and gun crime rates found no effect on violence in society by PG-13 rated movies, equivalent to the UK's 12A rating. The British Board of Film Classification found it to be among parents' main concerns (stock image)</p><p>The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) surveyed more than 10,000 people and found it to be among parents' main concerns. </p><p>Professor, of Psychology Christopher Ferguson at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida, who conducted the new research, says the public health threat of violent movies may be 'difficult to substantiate.'</p><p>He said: 'Some parents could become desensitised to violence in PG-13 rated movies and, if so, were more likely to bring their children to see such movies, particularly when gun violence appeared to be justified. </p><p>'The worry that violence in films cause horrific acts of violence is certainly not new.</p><p>'For example, media scholars previously argued that violent portrayals in cinema seem to encourage copycat killings and even that the apparent rise in school shootings coincides with increases in violent films.'</p><p>The findings come just days Britain's ratings body ruled that under-15s would no longer be able to see films that depict rape and other sexual violence. A scene from thriller Cloverfield, which was rated PG-13 or 12A, the rating in the UK </p><p>It had been thought that violent scenes in movies and TV were becoming increasingly gruesome. There has been widespread speculation that each generation of viewers become desensitised to onscreen violence which, in turn, fuels crime and murder. This image is taken from Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight 18</p><p>Scholars have even claimed that 10 per cent of violence in society can be attributed to the impact of violent media.</p><p>'Perhaps not surprisingly politicians, the media, and laypersons often grasp onto such statements and assume researchers have actually found a link between violent films and horrific acts of violence,' Professor Ferguson said.</p><p>'However claims about the actual public health threat of violent movies may be difficult to substantiate.'</p><p>The study suggested that some parents could become desensitised to violence in PG-13 rated movies and were more likely to bring their children to see such movies, particularly when gun violence appeared to be justified. Leonardo DiCaprio and Jamie Foxx pictured in Quentin Tarrantino's Django Unchained, 18</p><p>Researchers hypothesised that years in which films were more violent would also exhibit higher rates of violent crime, and that a rise in gun violence depicted in PG-13-rated movies would be associated with changes in gun related homicides. Jamie Foxx pictured in Quentin Tarrantino's Django Unchained, 18</p><p>Professor Ferguson added: 'Evidence suggests that edgier, more violent content may increase in PG-13 and PG movies over time.</p><p>'This is because PG-13 rated movies may be considered particularly marketable as action-oriented fun but without the graphicness that parents may consider inappropriate for younger children.</p><p>'This had been called a 'ratings creep'. However, whether it is an actual problem for public health remains unknown; that's the research gap we aimed to fill in this study.'</p><p>He hypothesised that years in which films were more violent would also exhibit higher rates of violent crime, and that a rise in gun violence depicted in PG-13-rated movies would be associated with changes in gun related homicides.</p><p>They  examined any link between a rise in violence and gun use in PG-13-rated movies with levels of gun related homicide, homicide and aggravated assault in US society.</p><p>It looked at data on PG-13-rated movies collected by other researchers during previous research and crime rates from The FBI and other organisations from 1985 to 2015.</p><p>It had been thought that violent scenes in movies and TV were becoming increasingly gruesome. Here, a scene from 1996 Quentin Tarantino horror From Dusk Till Dawn. Tarantino has come under fire in the past for his gory scenes in films. </p><p>Professor Ferguson said: 'Our analysis of data on violent crime and depictions of violence in PG-13-rated movies shows no evidence of a public health concern.</p><p>'Thus, the 'low hanging fruit' argument that suggests parents should reduce their children's exposure to violent movies as a simple way of reducing exposure to risk factors for crime, may cause more harm than good.</p><p>'It may distract from the hard work of dealing with real pressing problems by focusing society, parents and policy makers in an illusory simple fix.' </p><p>The authors suggested policy makers remain focused on issues that have been demonstrated to impact criminality, such as family environment, mental health, poverty and education.</p><p>There is a difference between the US and UK ratings. For example, the US horror flick Cloverfield was rated PG-13 in the US but received a 15 rating in the UK. </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Vitamin D overtakes vitamin C to become the UK's best-seller, as Britons stock up on 'sunshine drug'

    Vitamin D overtakes vitamin C to become the UK's best-seller, as Britons stock up on 'sunshine drug'

    lth supplement as we try to cope with long and gloomy winters.</p><p>The ‘sunshine vitamin’ – produced naturally by the body when the skin is exposed to the sun – has overtaken vitamin C, which is found in fruit and vegetables, following evidence that millions are deficient.</p><p>Worryingly, a lack of vitamin D has been associated with a return in rickets among children.</p><p>Vitamin D (file photo of a multivitamin) has overtaken vitamin C as the nation's favourite supplement</p><p>Experts have blamed a lack of vitamin D amongst young people on lack of outdoor play fuelled by video games (a child playing a popular game above) </p><p>Rickets, a bone disease common in Victorian times, was virtually eradicated in the 1950s. But cases more than doubled in the decade to 2016.</p><p>Experts blame the rise on reduced exposure to sunshine in early childhood due to a lack of outdoor play, and diets low in vitamin D-rich foods such as oily fish, eggs and liver.</p><p>Sales of vitamin D among the old have been boosted by research showing it can combat osteomalacia, a bone pain condition, as well as helping to prevent fractures.</p><p>Retail analysts Mintel said 56 per cent of those who use supplements take a multivitamin. Of those who take a single supplement, 33 per cent take vitamin D, 27 per cent vitamin C, 15 per cent vitamin B, 12 per cent vitamin A and 10 per cent vitamin E.</p><p>Mintel found that vitamin D usage has ticked upwards for all age groups, but the biggest change was among those aged 35-54 with a rise from 22 per cent to 35 per cent.</p><p>The NHS says Britons do not get enough vitamin D from sunlight between October and early March and so they should eat the right foods or take supplements.</p><p>It advises: ‘Since it’s difficult for people to get enough vitamin D from food alone, everyone (including pregnant and breastfeeding women) should consider taking a daily supplement containing ten micrograms of vitamin D during the autumn and winter.’</p><p>Mintel estimates £442million of vitamins and supplements were sold last year, which is a rise of 6 per cent over five years.</p><p>It predicts sales will climb to £477million by 2023.</p><p>Vitamin D supplements - the 'sunshine drug' - are picked up by many customers in the winter period who worry they are not getting enough sunlight (Workers in London enjoying the sun in August, pictured)</p><p>Anita Winther, research analyst at Mintel, said: ‘The ongoing focus on health, both among consumers and in the public debate, is seeing people take a more proactive approach towards their wellbeing.</p><p>‘The interest in health is expected to be a major driver for vitamin, minerals and supplements sales, while the ageing population should continue to drive growth in the over-50s segment.</p><p>‘Vitamin D has proved to be a star performer in the sector, with its health benefits during the winter months continuing to be a popular topic. This will have undoubtedly helped boost usage, raising its profile.’</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Every three seconds somebody in the UK has an asthma attack, 'shocking' figures show

    Every three seconds somebody in the UK has an asthma attack, 'shocking' figures show

    ck, new figures suggest.</p><p>Data from the charity Asthma UK shows that those with asthma are having more attacks every year than previously thought.</p><p>It surveyed more than 10,000 people with asthma, who reported having an attack on average twice a year.</p><p>With 5.4million people in the UK currently having treatment for asthma, experts calculated that this averaged one attack every three seconds.</p><p>Previous data, collected five years ago from prescription information, suggested that attacks took place every 10 seconds.</p><p>Kelly May, 31, from London, has had hundreds of asthma attacks since she was a baby. Data from the charity Asthma UK shows that every three seconds, somebody in the US has an attack</p><p>But the new figures, based on discussions with patients themselves, suggest attacks are far more frequent.</p><p>Asthma attacks can be life-threatening, killing three people on average every day.</p><p>The condition affects the airways, narrowing them and making it harder to breathe.</p><p>Triggers can include cold air, coughs and colds, and grass pollen.</p><p>Dr Andy Whittamore, clinical lead at Asthma UK, said: 'It is shocking to think that every three seconds in the UK someone could be having an asthma attack, a terrifying experience than can cause distress and in some cases prove fatal.</p><p>'Asthma attacks do not come out of the blue and if people recognise the tell-tale signs that an attack is about to strike, they can get the help that could save their life.'</p><p>The charity warns that if people need to use their reliever inhaler - usually a blue colour - three or more times a week, or are are waking up at night because of their asthma, they should contact their GP.</p><p>They should also seek help if their symptoms, such as wheezing or a cough, are getting worse or are interfering with their usual activities.</p><p>Those with a preventer inhaler - usually coloured brown - should take it daily to help build up protection against asthma attacks.</p><p>Kelly May, 31, a hairdresser from London, has had hundreds of asthma attacks since she was a year old.</p><p>She said: 'Having an asthma attack can feel like being a fish out of water and it's terrifying.</p><p>'No matter what I do, I can't catch my breath. I try not to panic but in the back of my mind I know I need to get to A&amp;E or it could be fatal.</p><p>'People think that asthma isn't serious, but I've had asthma attacks at work and it's terrifying for those around me.</p><p>'The aftermath of an asthma attack can also be exhausting and horrible - it can take me weeks until I feel normal again.</p><p>'In winter, I must be especially careful as the slightest cold can land me in hospital fighting for my life.' </p><p>NHS data shows there were more than 77,000 hospital admissions for the condition last year.</p><p>Around 1,250 Britons die from asthma every year and mortality rate is the third highest in Europe, behind only Estonia and Spain. </p><p>Asthma may not be an obvious cause of a heart attack - it affects the respiratory system (airways), not the cardiovascular system (arteries). </p><p>But studies have shown that asthma can double the risk of a heart attack.</p><p>The reason for the link is unclear, but likely boils down to inflammation and swelling.  </p><p>Asthma, an inflammatory disease of the lungs, causes the lining of air passages to swell, restricting the flow of oxygen through the body. It affects more than 25 million Americans, according to CDC data. </p><p>A study by the Mayo Clinic in 2014 found that anyone who has sought asthma treatment in the last year, or who has suffered regular symptoms for a year, has double the risk of a heart attack. </p><p>The study eliminated people who also suffered COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), which is common in asthma sufferers and increases the risk of a heart attack by restricting oxygen flow. </p><p>'A severe asthma attack can strain your heart, and the issue is two-fold. </p><p>'First, it is the lack of ability to exhale oxygen. The person is unable to properly oxygenate their body. When we are breathing, we breathe in oxygen and breathe out carbon dioxide. Asthma sufferers are unable to exhale enough carbon dioxide and that can build up. The heart is then working harder than it usually would to compensate.</p><p>'Second, the heart is unable to send blood to the brain because it doesn't have enough oxygen.'</p><p>Erica Garner suffered a fatal heart attack in December. </p><p>The young activist suffered her first shortly after giving birth; during her pregnancy she'd been diagnosed with an enlarged heart (peripartum cardiomyopathy). </p><p>Asthma is the most common life-threatening condition for pregnant women. </p><p>It can lead to high blood pressure, premature birth and death. It can also affect a baby's development, birth weight, and can cause stillbirth. </p><p>Restricted oxygen flow is also the primary causes of peripartum cardiomyopathy, which is exacerbated by the baby's need for oxygen and essential nutrients. </p><p>Dr Parikh agreed: 'It's a combination of factors; it's never just one thing.'</p><p>Dr Parikh says she always warns patients that even those who are best medicated have double the risk of a heart attack, and 10 Americans a day die of asthma.</p><p>'I want to drive the point home that you cannot take your asthma diagnosis lightly,' Dr Parikh said. 'You need to work with your doctor to find the right medication for you because it can be fatal.' </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Why you should never ignore an unusual rash on your child

    Why you should never ignore an unusual rash on your child

    e-known disease that if left untreated could cause permanent damage to your child's heart or even death.</p><p>Bindy Scott found out the hard way that the rash on her toddler Tommy's body was more than just a viral infection.</p><p>Mother-of-two Bindy Scott found out the hard way that the rash on her son Tommy's body (pictured) was more than just a viral infection</p><p>In October 2017 at their daughter's birthday party, 22-month-old Tommy woke up a little bit 'off', with Mrs Scott describing him as a 'bit grumbly and clingy'. </p><p>'He enjoyed the party and spending time with his Nan, but he didn't eat as much as normal and we all agreed it was probably due to a big molar he was cutting,' she wrote.</p><p>'That afternoon he started getting lethargic and that night was dreadful. He was awake screaming and had a 38C fever.</p><p>'Sunday morning when we woke up he had a rash on his tummy. By the time we had finished breakfast and we changed his nappy again it had spread to his back. So off to the hospital emergency department we went.'</p><p>The doctor assumed it was a viral disease like hand, foot and mouth, but when the rash spread even further - and the family rushed back to the hospital - they guessed it might actually be an allergic reaction or scarlet fever.</p><p>Tommy's symptoms continued to snowball: He began vomiting and had diarrhoea alongside the raging red rash that wouldn't subside.</p><p>On October last year at their daughter's birthday party, Tommy woke up a little bit 'off', with Mrs Scott describing him as a 'bit grumbly and clingy'</p><p>On their third trip to the ER Tommy had a blood test and a cannula inserted to rebuild his lost fluids.</p><p>'They ran many tests; blood cultures, x-ray and from memory I think they started a broad spectrum antibiotic,' Mrs Scott said. </p><p>He was even transferred to another hospital as doctors scrambled to diagnose the 22-month-old.</p><p>'The next few days were a blur with lots of tears. I sat in a hospital bed scared out of my mind holding our little man who just slept,' she continued.</p><p>'He didn't want to do anything and he was so upset. I felt like a zombie and my heart was shattered. Days earlier he was his normal cheeky self. I was wracking my brain trying to think how he got sick and I didn't stop praying for him to get better. </p><p>'Wednesday was a rough day of more tests and this was the day he started to swell up. His little body went puffy, his hands and feet were like little balloons and his eyelids were so swollen.'</p><p>'They ran many tests; blood cultures, x-ray and from memory I think they started a broad spectrum antibiotic,' Mrs Scott (pictured) said</p><p>Kawasaki disease, named after the Japanese pediatrician who discovered the condition, is an inflammation of the blood vessels.</p><p>The condition most often affects children under five years old.</p><p>It typically manifests itself by a body rash, fever that lasts at least five days, swollen lymph nodes, lips, tongue, feet and hands, and red eyes.</p><p>In most cases, the inflammation doesn't have long-lasting consequences. But in certain cases, the coronary artery or the heart muscle are damaged.</p><p>When these complications occur, patients can later suffer from aneurysms and heart attacks, which can be fatal.</p><p>During those days the family waited patiently for blood test results to come back, before a paediatrician asked on Thursday evening whether Mrs Scott had heard of Kawasaki disease.   </p><p>'I hadn't. She and the doctors she had been speaking to believed this is what he had, unfortunately there is no test for this disease - just ruling out other possible problems and that's what we had been doing,' she explained.</p><p>They decided to treat him for Kawasaki using intravenous immunoglobulin - a solution of human plasma proteins - which was 'not at all dangerous for him to have'.</p><p>'Saturday he did seem to pick up, he was more alert and playing. He was actually playing with toys,' Mrs Scott said.</p><p>'He ate more and just seemed brighter. We were so thankful that this treatment had seemed to work, if it hadn't he would've had another round of it and if that failed, then he would receive a lumbar puncture - but thankfully we avoided that.'</p><p>Mrs Scott is sharing Tommy's story before Kawasaki Awareness Day on January 26 in hopes other parents can be more aware of the symptoms</p><p>Mrs Scott is sharing Tommy's story before Kawasaki Awareness Day on January 26 in hopes other parents can be more aware of the symptoms.</p><p>'I want to encourage you, that if your child is sick and you are given one diagnosis and then they worsen or change - go back,' she explained.</p><p>'Keep going back until the treatment works or you see improvement. You don't have to accept one opinion. We are our children's advocates. We have to fight for them.</p><p>'I knew each time in myself when he needed to go back to the hospital and I didn't care if it turned out to be nothing, I would prefer to be known as the overcautious mother than regret not taking him or leaving it too late. </p><p>'If we had just agreed it was some viral thing and tried to ride it out over a week, I hate to think of what the outcome could've been.'</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Couples who laugh together stay together, scientists discover

    Couples who laugh together stay together, scientists discover

    ng or jibing that they cry over Sir David Attenborough documentaries, scientists have discovered couples who poke fun at each other are more likely to go the distance.</p><p>And inside jokes are particularly important because they 'affirm your relationship through laughter', the researchers claim.</p><p>But, they warn, couples who share 'mean-spirited jokes' are unlikely to last, with nasty jibes indicating a problem in the relationship. </p><p>Scientists have discovered couples who laugh together are more likely to last (stock)</p><p>The research was carried out by the University of Kansas and led by associate professor Jeffrey Hall from the department of communication studies. </p><p>'Playfulness between romantic partners is a crucial component in bonding and establishing relational security,' Professor Hall said. </p><p>'Particularly shared laughter, is an important indicator of romantic attraction between potential mates.' </p><p>People in open relationships are no more sexually and emotionally satisfied than monogamous couples, research suggests.</p><p>As long as couples have sex to be close to each other or to fulfill their desires, there is no difference in how content people are with their partners, a study found last June.</p><p>Those who get intimate for less personal reasons - such as to avoid an argument - are less likely to be happy in their relationships regardless of whether it is open or monogamous, the research adds.</p><p>Lead author Jessica Wood, from the University of Guelph, said: 'We found people in consensual, non-monogamous relationships experience the same levels of relationship satisfaction, psychological well-being and sexual satisfaction as those in monogamous relationships.</p><p>'This debunks societal views of monogamy as being the ideal relationship structure.' </p><p>The scientists analysed 39 studies made up of more than 150,000 participants to determine how important humour is in a romantic relationship. </p><p>Results - published in full in the next issue of the journal Personal Relationships - suggest that people thinking you are funny or can make a joke out of anything does not mean you will be more lucky in love.</p><p>But couples who 'create humour together' - via inside jokes - are more likely to last.  </p><p>'People say they want a sense of humour in a mate, but that's a broad concept,' Professor Hall said. </p><p>'What is strongly related to relationship satisfaction is the humour that couples create together.</p><p>'Say you and your partner share a quirky sense of humour, but romantic comedies or sit-coms do nothing for either of you. </p><p>'It's not that any style or sense of humour is any better or worse. What matters is you both see quirky humour as hysterical. </p><p>'If you share a sense of what's funny, it affirms you and affirms your relationship through laughter.' </p><p>But before you laugh at your other half's receding hairline or moan about your mother-in-law, Professor Hall warns couples not to go too far.</p><p>'Having an aggressive sense of humour is a bad sign for the relationship in general, but it is worse if the style of humour is used in the relationship,' he said. </p><p>'If you think that your partner tells mean-spirited jokes, then it's likely you've seen that firsthand in your relationship.' </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Do NOT put parsley in your vagina! Doctors make warning after 'irresponsible' Marie Claire article

    Do NOT put parsley in your vagina! Doctors make warning after 'irresponsible' Marie Claire article

    advice of putting parsley in their vagina to kick-start their period.</p><p>The bizarre suggestion was made by women's magazine Marie Claire alongside other recommendations using food, drink and exercise.</p><p>Women may want to make their period come sooner as a means of controlling their cycle ahead of a holiday or special event.  </p><p>According to the article, parsley is an emmenagogue - a substance that increases menstrual flow - which can 'soften the cervix and level out hormonal imbalances'. </p><p>But doctors have now urged women to never insert vegetables into the vagina, as it could lead to health risks - including potentially death. </p><p>Doctors are warning women to not take the 'irresponsible' advice of putting parsley in the vagina to kick-start their period. According to the Marie Claire article, parsley is an emmenagogue which can 'soften the cervix and level out hormonal imbalances'</p><p>'I would urge women not to insert anything unless they have taken proper medical advice.'</p><p>Dr Sheila Newman, an obstetrician-gynaecologist from New Jersey, also spoke of her concern over the practice, which is not medically advised. She branded it 'irresponsible'.  </p><p>The bizarre suggestion to use parsley to induce periods was made by women's magazine Marie Claire.</p><p>The herb was mentioned alongside other unusual recommendations, including other foods.</p><p>'Parsley can help to soften the cervix and level out hormonal imbalances that could be delaying your cycle,' the article said. </p><p>It added that this 'helps your period come faster'. </p><p>The piece suggested women may want to make their period come sooner as a means of controlling their cycle ahead of a holiday or special event. </p><p>But two medics hit back and said that vegetables generally aren't something that should be put in a vagina for any reason.</p><p>Mayo Clinic states 'the presence of a vaginal foreign body may alter the normal bacterial flora of the vagina', which can cause discharge, itching and pain.</p><p>She said: 'That is not something that is recommended by gynaecologists.</p><p>'There are only a few things that should go in your vagina and vegetables generally aren't one of them.'</p><p>The Marie Claire article said: 'While few of us would feature parsley as the main part of a dish, it turns out the herb is a mild emmenagogue and can help to kick-start your period, so you might want to look into some parsley recipes ASAP. </p><p>'Parsley can help to soften the cervix and level out hormonal imbalances that could be delaying your cycle, helping your period come faster. </p><p>'If you're struggling to find a dish based on parsley, don't panic – the most effective forms are said to be parsley tea and parsley vaginal inserts.' </p><p>Emmenagogues are defined in herbal medicine as a stimulant for menstrual flow but have no scientific studies to support this, and it is not used in practices. </p><p>It is not the first time parsley has been claimed to induce a period. </p><p>Bustle wrote in April 2015: 'As any herbalist will tell you, emmenagogues are a family of herbs that stimulate blood flow in the pelvis and uterus, and can sometimes make your period come sooner.</p><p>Parsley has been used before as a herbal-medicine to induce home abortions, seen as 'risk-free' because it is natural.  </p><p>The article said: 'If you're struggling to find a dish based on parsley, don't panic – the most effective forms are said to be parsley tea and parsley vaginal inserts'</p><p>But in August last year, it was reported that a 24-year-old mother-of-two from Argentina had died after trying to induce a miscarriage by using parsley.</p><p>Her death happened a week after the Argentine Senate rejected a bill that would have legalised abortion up to 14 weeks. </p><p>Clairín, Argentina's largest newspaper, reported that the victim, only referred to as Elizabeth, died of septic shock and infection. </p><p>Dr Newman said there are ways to manipulate the menstrual cycle, as the Marie Clare article suggested, but these should be discussed with your gynaecologist.'</p><p>Experts urged women not to use trendy apple cider vinegar to 'tighten' their vaginas in October 2017 after online blogs and forums encouraged women to carry out the bizarre douching technique.</p><p>To maintain the vagina's strength and tone, women should perform pelvic floor exercises regularly, Professor Cardozo recommends. </p><p>Women who use intimate-health products are more at risk of bacterial, fungal and urinary tract infections (UTIs), research in April 2018 from the University of Guelph, suggested.</p><p>Vaginal sanitising gels raise women's risk of developing a genital bacterial infection by almost 20 times and a yeast infection, like thrush, by eight times, a study found.</p><p>Intimate washes make women 3.5 times more likely to catch a bacterial infection and 2.5 times more at risk of a yeast infestation, the research adds.</p><p>Vaginal wipes double the risk of a UTI, while lubricants and moisturising creams increase women's susceptibility to thrush by 2.5 times, the study found.</p><p>A gynecologist slammed Gwyneth Paltrow's suggestion for women to put jade eggs up their vaginas as ridiculous and dangerous.</p><p>Writing on her lifestyle blog goop, the Hollywood actress claimed the $66 rocks boost orgasms, vaginal muscle tone, hormonal balance, and 'feminine energy'.</p><p>Women, Paltrow explained through an interview with her 'beauty guru/healer/inspiration/friend', should clench the egg inside them all day to exercise their pelvic floor.</p><p>But acclaimed gynecologist Dr Jen Gunter warned in January 2019 that the whole idea is nonsense - and could even increase the risk of bacterial vaginosis or deadly toxic shock syndrome.</p><p>Doctors warned about this procedure after Mel B, 43, revealed she had the insides of her vagina scraped out and new tissue put inside after her bitter divorce with ex-husband Stephen Belafonte.  </p><p>The procedure, which has been largely unheard of until Mel B spoke out, could lead to a serious risk of infection, experts have said. </p><p>She said: 'Any scraping of the vaginal epithelium [tissue] could affect the vaginal ecosystem and theoretically could spread HPV locally and would increase a woman's vulnerability to infection.</p><p>She added that the vagina regenerates itself every 96 hours and the surface cells are shed every four hours.  </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019
  • 
	Viewers left 'sobbing' by the heart-breaking stories of brain unit patients on Hospital

    Viewers left 'sobbing' by the heart-breaking stories of brain unit patients on Hospital

    nd Tom, 18, both of whom have been stuck in Liverpool's Walton Centre after sustaining severe brain injuries. </p><p>And it followed the work of 'incredible' staff in the centre, which cares for patients who have suffered life-changing brain and spinal damage. </p><p>Medics working at the Walton Centre were lauded as 'heroes' and one viewer said their skills are 'beyond anything I can comprehend'. </p><p>Sophie, 22, was one of the patients featuring on last night's programme because she was left unable to breathe on her own after she developed swelling on her brain stem last year</p><p>Tom, 18, suffers from short-term memory loss because he sustained serious head injuries when he was thrown from the window of his car in a crash – he regularly forgets he has brain damage</p><p>Sophie and Tom were unable to leave the centre because there was nowhere to send them for the ongoing care they needed.</p><p>Sophie suffered inflammation in her brain stem in January last year, which left her unable to breathe on her own.</p><p>She has mostly recovered – initially not able to move her eyes or swallow after her illness – but still needs 24-hour care and a ventilator in case she stops breathing.</p><p>The Walton Centre has struggled to find funding for at-home care for Sophie, so she has been left living in the unit for an entire year.</p><p>Viewers said they were left in tears by her 'sad' story but also called her 'inspirational' as she continued her recovery, having therapy to get her voice back after a tracheotomy.</p><p>Ian Wildgust tweeted: 'Sophie on #Hospital how inspirational is she? Amazing!'</p><p>Twitter user Kerry added: 'Actually sobbing watching #Sophie on #Hospital ... so sad'.</p><p>Jackie Wilcock said: 'What an amazing and beautiful young woman Sophie is. Never complained and is an inspiration'.  </p><p>Sophie had herself tweeted before the programme aired, saying she couldn't wait for people to see how  'truly amazing' staff at the centre are.</p><p>Ian Wildgust was among many Twitter users commenting on how 'inspiring' Sophie's story was</p><p>Twitter user Kerry said she was left 'actually sobbing' by Sophie's story, which gave an insight into her life after she suffered a traumatic swelling on the brain in January last year</p><p>Jackie Wilcock added 'what an amazing and beautiful young woman Sophie is' – Sophie, 22, lost the ability to breathe unassisted, move her eyes or swallow when she became ill last year</p><p>Marina Sans Bateaux said she hopes Sophie's condition will improve, adding she was 'full of awe and admiration for the medical staff' at the Walton Centre</p><p>Sophie had herself tweeted before the programme was shown, saying she 'can't wait for everyone to see how amazing the staff at the Walton Neuro Centre are'</p><p>Another patient on the programme, Tom, was suffering from short-term memory loss after a car crash left him with serious head injuries.</p><p>As a result he couldn't remember that he had brain damage and repeatedly tried to leave the hospital without being discharged.</p><p>Staff had to keep him in the centre for his own safety, something which he regularly forgot and was angered by. </p><p>Viewers sympathised with the frustrated teenager, with many saying they felt sorry for him and remarking on his joy when he was finally allowed to leave The Walton.</p><p>Twitter user Sara said: 'I feel sorry for Tom. You can tell he's not the person who he was before just from that short clip. </p><p>'That must be devastating for him, especially at such a young age.'</p><p>Sara, alongside other Twitter users, said she felt sorry for Tom, who suffered from a devastating brain injury when he was thrown from his car window in a crash</p><p>Tom, who now has short-term memory loss and doesn't remember that he has brain damage, 'seems absolutely lovely', according to Amanda Smith </p><p>Amanda Smith added: 'Tom seems absolutely lovely after a serious brain injury. I can only imagine how lovely he was before the accident. </p><p>'So happy he got to go to a rehab near his family. Hope it does the trick!'</p><p>Most people watching the programme tweeted their support for the NHS and its 'amazing' and 'inspiring' staff.</p><p>The British DJ Anton Powers tweeted: 'This #Hospital programme has got me in bits. </p><p>'All the staff and patients are absolute [heroes]. I have nothing but respect and admiration for them all'.</p><p>Most people tweeting about Hospital were expressing their admiration for the NHS staff at the Walton Centre and across the country more generally – Claire Brown said: 'The medical staff are absolutely incredible, their skills are beyond anything I can comprehend'</p><p>Jon Bolger said the BBC Two documentary was 'A wonderful reminder how awesome the @NHSuk is'</p><p>Anton Powers, a British DJ, said the programme had him 'in bits', adding he had 'nothing but respect &amp; admiration' for the NHS staff</p><p>A Twitter user called Sarah, who claims to be a patient of The Walton Centre herself, said she was 'proud' to be treated by the staff there and was 'forever grateful' for their help</p><p>Jon Bolger said: 'A wonderful reminder how awesome the @NHSuk is.'</p><p>And Claire Brown added: 'Watching #Hospital on BBC Two now is shocking yet inspiring. The medical staff are absolutely incredible, their skills are beyond anything I can comprehend'.</p><p>One woman claiming to be a patient of the Walton Centre herself tweeted: 'I’m proud to be a patient of The Walton Centre. </p><p>'The staff provide the best possible care for patients even in the most difficult circumstances of the NHS crisis. I’m forever grateful'.   </p><p>Hospital continues on BBC Two at 9pm next Thursday, January 24.</p><p>Viewers watching BBC's Hospital last week, as well as being outraged by the state of a deteriorating hospital, had an outpouring of emotion for a three-year-old boy in the nearby Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool.</p><p>Charlie was having advanced brain surgery to try and remove an aggressive tumour.</p><p>Clips showed paediatric neurosurgeon Conor Mallucci explaining to Charlie's parents, John and Nici, that their son's cancer was spreading fast and he needed to operate quickly.</p><p>Three-year-old Charlie had high-risk brain surgery at Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool to remove a tumour so he could have proton beam therapy in Germany</p><p>Charlie's surgery, to remove a rare form of brain cancer called an ependymoma was ultimately a success and meant he qualified for the NHS to send him to Germany to have pioneering and potentially life-saving proton beam therapy.</p><p>Viewers admitted to welling up while watching his story and the NHS has confirmed he has been recovering well since the documentary was filmed.</p><p>ITV journalist Elaine Willcox said she was 'sobbing at Charlie's story', echoing the emotions of many viewers who were delighted to see his surgery was a success</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 18, 2019

Comments