Giuliani says 'parking tickets and jaywalking' all that's left for investigators

"I’m telling you, George, they’re going to go try to look for unpaid parking tickets and see if they can nail him for unpaid parking tickets," he told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos, referring to the investigation in the Southern District of New York.

"As you know, the Southern District said this is far more serious than an unpaid parking ticket," Stephanopoulos pressed during the interview on “This Week,” Sunday. "They said this strikes at the heart of our democratic system."

Giuliani responded, "Oh – oh, right. A campaign finance violation? Give me a break."

Stephanopoulos also asked Giuliani if special counsel Robert Mueller was "almost done" with his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether any Trump campaign members directly coordinated with the Russian government.

Giuliani said, "He is done. I don't know what else -- I told you. No, the only thing left are the parking tickets and jaywalking."

Stephanopoulos went on to ask more specific questions about the investigations surrounding the president.

He asked Giuliani if Roger Stone, Trump's former longtime political adviser, ever gave the president a heads up concerning Wikileaks planning to release information concerning former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and the Democractic National Committee.

But when Stephanopoulos asked again, Giuliani said, “I don't believe so.”

“If Roger Stone gave anybody a heads up about WikiLeaks leaks, that's not a crime,” he added. “It would be like giving him a heads up that the [New York] Times is going to print something.”

“You are saying you never spoke to Julian Assange, never contacted WikiLeaks, never spoke to any of that to President Trump?” Stephanopoulos said.

“That is absolutely correct,” Stone said on Dec. 2. “No, I had no contact with Assange.”

“Did the president know about Don Jr.’s Trump Tower meeting with the Russians at the time?” Stephanopoulos asked.

“No,” Giuliani said. “Definitely, he didn’t know about it.”

Stephanopoulos asked if there was still the potential for the president to sit down with Mueller for an interview, in addition to the written answers he submitted to the special counsel.

“The agreement we had [with the special counsel] did contemplate that there’d be a period of time after the questions that we would have a discussion about whether there should be any further questions,” Giuliani said. “So I’m not saying we are or we aren’t, but that’s in the agreement.”

 

December 16, 2018

Sources: ABC News

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