France attack: 1 person to appear before judge

An official close to the investigation, who could not be named as the case was ongoing, said the man is suspected of having been involved in supplying the weapon used by suspected gunman Cherif Chekatt in the Dec. 11 attack. Chekatt died in a shootout with police in Strasbourg Thursday.

The suspect is the only one of seven people initially detained as part of the investigation who is still in custody.

The death toll from the attack increased to five Sunday night after a Polish man died of his wounds in a Strasbourg hospital. Barto Orent-Niedzielski, 36, lived in the city, where he worked at the European Parliament and as a journalist. The other casualties include a tourist from Thailand and an Italian journalist covering the European Parliament.

According to some reports, Orent-Niedzielski fought the shooter and stopped him from entering a crowded club, possibly preventing more deaths.

Monika Scislowska in Warsaw contributed to this report.

 

December 17, 2018

Sources: ABC News

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  • Mosque-based Scout group investigated by police over links to an Islamic extremist

    Mosque-based Scout group investigated by police over links to an Islamic extremist

    e after links to an 'Islamic extremist' preacher and claims that the group leader encouraged girls as young as five pose in videos, advocating wearing the hijab. </p><p>Imam Shakeel Begg, from the Lewisham Islamic Centre, has been described as an extremist </p><p>Hussain has since been suspended pending a police investigation into safeguarding concerns. </p><p>It was he who admitted encouraging members to be 'Muslim first', despite the Scouts commitment to 'British values'. </p><p>Facebook records also show that Hussain promoted a group that's owner donated money to David Irving, the Holocaust denier who described Hitler as a 'great man'.   </p><p>Back in December, the new chief ambassador for the global scouts movement - Bear Grylls - said the scouts can lead the fight against extremism by recruiting young Muslims in the UK. </p><p>He told the Sunday Telegraph: 'We have hundreds of mosques every week, reaching out, asking, 'Can we start up groups?'</p><p>Lewisham Islamic Centre, Lewisham, South East London, where Shakeel Begg is Imam</p><p>Imam Shakeel Begg talking at an event on the  'Importance of Political Participation'</p><p>Shakeel Begg has in the past lost a libel case against the BBC for dubbing him an extremist</p><p>Contrary to the Scouts leading the fight against extremism, court records between 2010 and 2014 reveal that the mosque invited Bilal Philips and Haitham al-Haddad to speak at the mosque. </p><p>The first was described by the US government as a co-conspirator in the 1993 World Trade Centre bombings.</p><p>He wasn't able to complete his address due to being banned from the UK in 2010.</p><p>The latter, al-Haddad, has advocated female genital mutilation and denounced homosexuality as a 'criminal' act. </p><p>Haitham al-Haddad pictured in 2009. He was invited to the Lewisham Centre to speak, despite advocating female genital mutilation and calling homosexuality a 'criminal act' </p><p>Shakeel Begg has also slammed UK police and said they are leading a campaign against Muslims, attempting a 'genocide' against them.</p><p>He also promoted a group that described ISIS executioner Jihadi John as a 'beautiful man'.</p><p>A spokesperson for the Henry Jackson Society, an anti-terrorism group, called Shakeel Begg an extremist 'categorically' and described Hussain's association with extremist groups as 'concerning'. </p><p>A spokesman for the Scouts said they were 'opposed to extremism in any form' and added that they reported the allegations to the Met Police. </p><p>They added: 'The safety of young people in our care is our number one priority.' </p><p>The Mail Online has reached out to both Hussain and the Lewisham Islamic Centre for comment.  </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 January 19, 2019

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