Wisconsin to pay for two transgender surgeries - and it could set a precedent for ALL patients

A federal judge has ordered Wisconsin to pay for the gender reassignment surgery for two transgender Medicaid recipients.

Cody Flack, 30, and Sara Ann Makenzie, 41, filed a lawsuit in April, saying a state rule denying coverage for surgeries to treat gender dysphoria violates the Affordable Care Act and their right to equal protection, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. 

The state rule that excludes coverage for undefined 'transsexual surgery' was adopted in 1996.

Cody Flack, 30, and Sara Ann Makenzie, 41, filed a suit in April saying a state rule denying coverage to treat gender dysphoria violates the Affordable Care Act and their right to equal protection

US District Judge William Conley granted a preliminary injunction Wednesday barring enforcement of the rule. 

He suggested the injunction could be expanded to include any transgender Medicaid patient whose doctor recommends the surgery.

'The likelihood of ongoing, irreparable harm facing these two individual plaintiffs outweighs any marginal impacts on the defendants' stated concerns regarding public health or limiting costs,' Conley said in the 39-page order.

Flack could get his surgery in two or three weeks, said Attorney Rock Pledl. He said Makenzie may have to wait a few months because of her status on the paperwork process with an HMO.

Flack, who has cerebral palsy, uses a motorized wheelchair and relies on Supplemental Security Income for the disabled as his sole support. 

He first identified as a boy at age 5, according the lawsuit. 

Makenzie is also is disabled and relies on Supplemental Security Income. She has been living as a woman since 2012.

The state's Medicaid has a budget of approximately $9.7 billion to cover about 1.2 million eligible residents. An estimated 5,000 of enrollees are transgender.

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July 27, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

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	The pensioner addicted to penis fillers

    The pensioner addicted to penis fillers

    n injections to make his manhood thicker and will soon have had the maximum amount allowed.</p><p>Eric Bell, 70, will have his fifth set of injections in January, which will increase his penis to around six inches in girth when erect.</p><p>From Keighley in West Yorkshire, Mr Bell said the £3,000-a-time fillers have boosted his confidence and kept his dating life exciting.</p><p>He claims to now be dating 'much younger women' who tell him they like his large penis, which is now a whole two inches thicker than it used to be.</p><p>After a life of feeling embarrassed about his member, the former nurse said the injections are the way forward and he'd tell other men to 'go for it'.</p><p>Eric Bell, 70, will have his fifth penis enlargement on Monday December 17, bringing him to maximum which is allowed after he says he became addicted to the procedure four years ago</p><p>'I used to look down and instantly feel depressed that my penis was too small,' said Mr Bell, who has the injections at Moorgate Andrology in Doncaster.</p><p>He said his opinion of his penis had, in the past, negatively affected his dating life and even a Viagra prescription didn't help.</p><p>Before the first procedure in September 2016, in which he had his penis both lengthened and widened, Mr Bell measured 5.5inches long by four inches in circumference.</p><p>Doctors snipped a ligament at the top of his penis to release his 'hidden length', increasing his manhood to 6.5inches long.</p><p>After having the first injection two years ago, Mr Bell has had regular top-ups to keep his girth at the level he wants it.  </p><p>Following the recent fillers, his penis is approximately the same circumference as a bottle of Lea &amp; Perrins Worcestershire Sauce.</p><p>Mr Bell said: 'I haven't been in a serious relationship before but now I'm dating much younger women and feel like my confidence is sky-high.</p><p>'Now I have a successful dating life and I'm happy.</p><p>'I was a nurse and wanted a non-invasive treatment that would work well.</p><p>'That's exactly what it's done, the women I've had sex with since say they love my large penis.'</p><p>The procedure works by injecting hyaluronic acid, the same substance used for many lip fillers, directly into the penis to make it larger.</p><p>Mr Bell has had four injections of hyaluronic acid into his penis to increase its width and claims the procedures have improved his confidence and he has a successful dating life</p><p>The fillers leave single Mr Bell with a girth of up to six inches – the UK average is 4.3 inches – by widening the penis with a substance used in lip fillers, which stays in the body for up to around 18 months</p><p>Enlarging the penis in this way aims only to increase the thickness of it, not the length, and is only temporary, lasting until the filler breaks down in the body. </p><p>Penis fillers are becoming increasingly popular and some clinics say they have seen a 70 per cent rise in the number of men wanting one in the past three years.</p><p>There is a risk of infection, scarring or bleeding which comes with the treatment, but Mr Bell said he isn't too worried about complications.</p><p>'I know the risks – I could be left scarred or with uncomfortable lumps, even sometimes bleeding or infection, but it's worth it,' he said. </p><p>And he will soon have to stop having the injections because he's had so many since he started in 2014.</p><p>When interviewing another man who had penis fillers last month, Phillip Schofield demonstrated the size of a penis 5.9 inches thick – the bottle on the right is 5.9 inches, whereas the pepper shaker is 4.9ins</p><p>David Mills, managing director of Moorgate Andrology where Mr Bell has the procedures, said: 'There is a limit and Eric has to be fit and well.</p><p>'It is treatment that is injected, and it has to be done by a qualified doctor.</p><p>'As long as the expectations are realistic, and clients stick to the aftercare procedure, it can work well. </p><p>'There's no sex for a month afterwards, and lumps and bumps can always appear. But Eric knows his own mind and is reasonable and a compliant patient.'  </p><p>For years, men the world over want to know if their manhood measures up compared to others.</p><p>So, a team of researchers in 2015 sought to find out the global average for penis size.</p><p>Their work revealed the mean length of an erect penis is 5.2 inches (13.12 cm), scientists found.</p><p>Meanwhile, the average length of a flaccid penis is 3.6 inches (9.16 cm) and 5.2 inches (13.24 cm) when flaccid but stretched.</p><p>And when it comes to girth, the average erect circumference was 4.6 inches (11.66 cm) and 3.7 inches (9.31 cm) when flaccid.</p><p>The research, carried out by King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, also found there was a small correlation between the erect length of a penis and a man's height.</p><p>The team looked at 17 studies of 15,521 men worldwide who underwent penis size measurements by health professionals using a standard procedure.</p><p>The paper was published in the British Journal of Urology International.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. 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    1 December 13, 2018
  • 
	Scientists create an electronic capsule that can wirelessly deliver drugs

    Scientists create an electronic capsule that can wirelessly deliver drugs

    wirelessly to deliver drugs has been designed by scientists.  </p><p>Researchers believe the 3D-printed device could provide drugs to patients battling diseases that require medication over longer periods of time.</p><p>The team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology created hope it could also be used to reduce the number of injections some patients need.</p><p>The gadget could also detect infections or allergic reactions, and then release a drug such as antihistamine in response.</p><p>Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology believe that the device (pictured) could be used to provide drugs to users for a variety of diseases that require medication over longer periods of time</p><p>The device can send information and take instructions from a user's smartphone via Bluetooth.  </p><p>'Our system could provide closed-loop monitoring and treatment,' said Professor Giovanni Traverso, co-author of the research.</p><p>He added that instructions on a smartphone could help guide the delivery of a drug or tuning the dose of a drug.</p><p>The device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology could provide drugs to patients battling diseases that require medication over longer periods of time.</p><p>The device could monitor certain people at high risk for infection, such as patients who are receiving chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs. If infection is detected, the capsule could begin releasing antibiotics.</p><p>They could also help patients to maintain the strict dosing regimens required for patients with HIV or malaria. </p><p>People with diabetes also have to stick to a careful pattern of medication to control their insulin.  </p><p>The scientists said the device could work with other health wearables and implants to send the information to the patient's phone or their doctor. </p><p>The capsule unfolds into a Y-shape after being swallowed, allowing arms to expand and lodge itself in the stomach for around a month, before it begins to break apart and leaves the body through the digestive tract. </p><p>The arms would contain drugs, however, the researchers plan for sensors to detect signals such as heart and breathing rate.  </p><p>Lead author of the paper, Professor Yong Lin Kong, said the limited connection range serves as a desirable security enhancement.</p><p>He said: 'The self-isolation of wireless signal strength within the user's physical space could shield the device from unwanted connections, providing a physical isolation for additional security and privacy protection.'</p><p>At the moment, a small silver oxide battery powers the device but alternatives, such as an external antenna or using stomach acid are being explored.</p><p>The group's latest work builds on previous attempts to create an ingestible pill. In 2016, they designed a star-shaped capsule with six arms that fold out. </p><p>It is hoped that humans will be able to test ingestible sensors within two years. </p><p>Professor Robert Langer, involved in the study, which is published in </p><p>Langer and Traverso are the senior authors of the study, which is published in Advanced Materials Technologies, said: 'We are excited about this demonstration of 3-D printing.' </p><p>3D printing is used to create complex items by layering material, rather than cutting something out of a material such as plastic in manufacturing.  </p><p>The capsule has combined many of the features the researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology had previously developed over the years.</p><p>Two years ago, they designed a star-shaped capsule with six arms that fold up before being encased in a smooth capsule.</p><p>After being swallowed, the capsule dissolves and the arms expand, allowing the device to lodge in the stomach.</p><p>Similarly, the new device unfolds into a Y-shape after being swallowed, enabling it to stick to the stomach for about a month.</p><p>It then breaks into smaller pieces and passes through the digestive tract.</p><p>One of these arms includes four small compartments that can be loaded with a variety of drugs.</p><p>The researchers also anticipated they could design the compartments to be opened remotely through wireless Bluetooth communication, with the drugs being released gradually over several days. </p><p>The current version is powered by a small silver oxide battery. Researchers are exploring the possibility of replacing the battery with alternative power sources, such as an external antenna or stomach acid.</p><p>The device can withstand stomach acid because it was built from alternating layers of stiff and flexible polymers. </p><p>The researchers used 3D-printing to allow them to incorporate all the various components involved in the capsule. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 13, 2018
  • 
	Older people are 50% more likely to visit A&E if they live alone than if they live with someone else

    Older people are 50% more likely to visit A&E if they live alone than if they live with someone else

    visit A&amp;E than those who live with family.</p><p>They are also at increased risk of being admitted to hospital as an inpatient and half more likely again to visit their GP, analysis by a leading health think-tank found.</p><p>The Health Foundation report found those living alone had more long-term health conditions than those with company. </p><p>An estimated 9 million people across the UK, almost a fifth of the population, report feeling lonely.</p><p>Pensioners who live alone are 50 per cent more likely to visit A&amp;E than those who live with family, think tank The Health Foundation have reported </p><p>Experts say those living solo are at far greater risk of social isolation, which is heavily linked to poor health.</p><p>Tackling loneliness and social isolation at its roots could therefore drive down pressure on hospitals and GP services, they conclude.</p><p>One in three over-65s in the UK live alone with the growing ageing population meaning numbers are set to soar.</p><p>Social isolation increases the risk of premature death from every cause for every race, research has found.</p><p>For white people (unlike other groups), solitude was found to significantly increase the risk of cancer.</p><p>For black people, being lonely doubles the risk of early death (it increases 60-84 percent for white people).</p><p>The study by the American Cancer Society, published in November, is one of the first to confirm the tangible risks of social isolation to every racial group.</p><p>Data was analysed from 580,182 adults enrolled into Cancer Prevention Study-II in 1982/1983, who were followed for mortality up until 2012.</p><p>The 30-year study collected information on various social factors for each person.  </p><p>Using that information, the researchers gave each person a social isolation 'score', ranging from 0 (the most lonely) to 5 (the most social). </p><p>They then looked at whether there was a correlation between that score and their general health.</p><p>The most socially isolated had the highest risk of death any way they cut it. Every risk increased for everyone, including heart disease. </p><p>Social isolation is a prolonged lack of contact with other people or society, whereas loneliness is a temporary scenario (whether it feels that way or not).</p><p>Kathryn Dreyer, of the Health Foundation said: 'Today's findings underline the fact that older people living alone have poorer health than those living with others, as well as more intensive health care needs.</p><p>'With the number of older people living alone set to continue to grow, more needs to be done to help people stay healthy and to offer more support and care in the community.'</p><p>The study of 1,447 older people found around a fifth (21 per cent) of those living alone visit their GP at least once a month, compared with 14 per cent of older people living with someone else.</p><p>Half had three or more long-term conditions, compared to 42.2 per cent of older people living with other people.</p><p>The findings also show that more than one in four older people living alone have a mental health condition, compared to one in five people living with others.</p><p>Existing research has shown poor social relationships can increase the likelihood of stroke by a third (32 per cent).</p><p>Loneliness, living alone and poor social connections are as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day.</p><p>Experts believe older people living alone are more unwell due to both loneliness and because of a lack of immediate support at home.</p><p>In October, the government announced a landmark 'loneliness strategy' amid concerns the problem is now a serious public health threat.</p><p>The Prime Minister confirmed all GPs in England will be able to refer patients experiencing loneliness to community activities - like cookery and ballroom dancing - and voluntary services by 2023.</p><p>This will allow GPs to direct patients to community workers offering tailored support to help people improve their health and wellbeing, instead of defaulting to medicine.</p><p>Laura Alcock-Ferguson, Executive Director of the Campaign to End Loneliness, said: 'There are over 2.2 million people aged 75 and over living alone in Great Britain - an increase of almost a quarter over the past 20 years. With a fast-ageing population, this is set to grow.</p><p>'Urgent preventative action is needed to meet the needs of this group.'</p><p>Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director at Age UK, added: 'It's understandable that those without friends, family or support networks turn more frequently to their GP or local hospital for help - they probably feel they have no other option.</p><p>'Increasing numbers of older people are ageing alone so we have to provide the help and services they need and not assume there will always be a willing family member around to step in.'  </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 13, 2018

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