Facebook is sorry: Ten times Mark Zuckerberg's social network apologized

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

Facebook has removed a post from Texas newspaper The Liberty County Vindicator that featured excerpts from the Declaration of Independence. Facebook's reason: the Declaration of Independence contained 'hate speech.'

Fox News has compiled a small sample of the incidents that prompted CEO Mark Zuckerberg or his colleagues to apologize.

In November 2016, Zuckerberg called the notion that fake news impacted the U.S. presidential election a “pretty crazy idea.” However, a federal grand jury indicted 13 Russians and three Russian companies for allegedly meddling in the presidential election—specifically calling out their usage of Facebook to sow discord and influence U.S. public opinion.

The newspaper, which surmised that the phrase “Indian savages” may have triggered the tech company’s algorithms, received a notice saying Facebook was “sorry” for removing the post and that the content had been restored.

Facebook Vice President of Global Policy Richard Allan says in the Channel 4 documentary: “You’ve identified some areas where we’ve failed, and I’m here today to apologize for those failings.”

After a dialogue with the band—which says the song is about patriotism and unity—Facebook reversed course and said: “We’ve spoken to the Wes Cook band to explain we made an error here,” it explained in a joint statement. “We’re grateful for their patience as we work to improve our policies.”

British users in March said the social media company’s suggestions, which are supposedly the result of popular search terms as determined by an algorithm, started to suggest unpleasant results to users who typed in "video of."

Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, removed a photograph of two men kissing that was taken by U.K.-based photographer Stella Asia Consonni for a magazine project for violating community guidelines. 

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

 

July 27, 2018

Sources: Fox

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  •  Apple announces plan to build $1 billion campus in Texas

    Apple announces plan to build $1 billion campus in Texas

    in, Texas.</p><p> The company statement early Thursday says it also plans to establish locations in Seattle, San Diego and Culver City, California, with more than 1,000 employees at each.</p><p> The tech giant based in Cupertino, California, says the new campus in Austin will start with 5,000 employees and provide jobs covering engineering, research and development, operations, finance, sales and customer support. It will be less than a mile from existing Apple facilities.</p><p> Austin already is home to more than 6,000 Apple employees, representing the largest population of its workers outside of its headquarters.</p><p> "Apple has been a vital part of the Austin community for a quarter century, and we are thrilled that they are deepening their investment in our people and the city we love," said Austin Mayor Steve Adler in the statement.</p>

    1 December 13, 2018
  •  Apple announces plan to build $1 billion campus in Texas

    Apple announces plan to build $1 billion campus in Texas

    in, Texas.</p><p> The company statement early Thursday says it also plans to establish locations in Seattle, San Diego and Culver City, California, with more than 1,000 employees at each.</p><p> The tech giant based in Cupertino, California, says the new campus in Austin will start with 5,000 employees and provide jobs covering engineering, research and development, operations, finance, sales and customer support. It will be less than a mile from existing Apple facilities.</p><p> Austin already is home to more than 6,000 Apple employees, representing the largest population of its workers outside of its headquarters.</p><p> "Apple has been a vital part of the Austin community for a quarter century, and we are thrilled that they are deepening their investment in our people and the city we love," said Austin Mayor Steve Adler in the statement.</p>

    1 December 13, 2018

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