TONY HETHERINGTON: Why leaving this investment service is a Smart idea

Barclays has had serious problems with the running of its investment offshoot ever since it switched customers from its former stockbroking service which seemed to have far fewer problems. Investors found the new scheme was less efficient to the point that it refused to let them buy or sell shares, rendering it pretty much useless and leading to a queue to leave.

Issues: A backlog of investors leaving Barclays has made the problem worse

That is one of the problems Smart Investor has had. The number of people exiting generated a backlog, putting pressure on staff and leading to even more problems.

You have told me you rang Barclays many times, waiting half an hour or more for an answer, only to find you could not speak to anyone who actually handled requests to switch to rival firms.

The closest Barclays came to giving a specific reason for the delay in handling transfers for you and your wife was when staff told you the National Insurance number it held for your wife was not the same as the number quoted by Hargreaves Lansdown. You checked and updated the details, but months later Barclays was still telling Hargreaves Lansdown the two records did not match.

Letters from Barclays provided a fresh layer of frustration. One acknowledged a complaint from you and promised an update a few weeks later. But what arrived was a further letter, itself promising an update a month from then.

I asked officials at the bank’s head office to look into all this. They accepted their systems had recorded an incorrect National Insurance number for your wife.

They told me: ‘The accounts have now been fully transferred and we have offered a gesture of goodwill.’

So far, so good. Except you told me you had received no such offer.

You added: ‘I will never deal with this company again.’ It turned out Barclays had sent £250 to your account, but nothing for your wife. You were told her complaint was being investigated separately.

At this point Barclays tried to refuse to speak to me because your wife had complained to the Financial Ombudsman Service. I had to point out the complaint had been made months ago since when Barclays had certainly discussed it with me in some detail. The bank then changed its mind, saying your wife’s ISA transfer had now been completed.

The bottom line is that the Ombudsman awarded your wife £250 on top of the same amount the bank had already offered.

The Ombudsman ruled that even if records showed an incorrect National Insurance number, this did not justify or explain a delay of six months in making the transfer which the bank’s own guidelines say should take six to eight weeks.

Something went horribly wrong last year in this department of the bank. I have had more complaints about this than other well known issues such as Payment Protection Insurance.

It will take a long time for Barclays to repair the damage to its reputation among customers who used its investment service.

Refusal: The owner of the Villa de Fanabe in Tenerife would not budge

Booking.com told me that when you made your reservation for the Villa de Fanabe, it would have ‘been clear at every stage of the booking process’ that the payment was non-refundable.

Well, up to a point. I waded through about a dozen pages of photographs, information and small print about the villa. There is a section headed ‘fine print’ where you might expect to find cancellation details there, but you would be wrong. 

Instead, there are the usual frequently asked questions, mainly about parking spaces and air conditioning. There is a sub-heading ‘policies’ and if you click on this then some way down the page it does clearly say ‘you will be charged the total price if you cancel your booking’.

To give Booking.com its due, it did do its best to help. I was told: ‘Booking.com has tried to persuade the property [owner] to modify dates or offer free cancellation, but unfortunately they are unwilling.’

As a gesture of goodwill, Booking.com itself has now refunded you €1,040 (about £920). The villa owner has done well out of this though. The villa has been booked again for the same dates so he is getting paid twice.

Slick: The fake website has all the details of the real firm bar the phone number

Well spotted. It is a scam. The letter you received looks as though it came from Capricorn Finance – with an address in Piccadilly, Central London, a proper company registration number, and authorisation from regulator the Financial Conduct Authority.

The letter is signed by director David Cunio and says you are owed £9,472, but you have to pay £1,894 in fees which will be refunded later, along with the £9,472 itself.

Anyone checking would find there really is a Capricorn, with an address in Piccadilly, and it does have the company number shown on the notepaper, and it is authorised by the regulator. One of its directors is David Cunio.

But look closely and you spot the phone number on the notepaper is 0203 290 7465 – this is not the number of the real Capricorn.

The genuine company has been ‘cloned’ by fraudsters who have even set up a fake website at capricorn-finance.com, but with their own phone number. This number is already in my files. It was used a few months ago when fraudsters cloned another company, Satis Asset management, in a similar type of scam.

If you had fallen for the fake Capricorn letter, you would have been told to send your payment by bank transfer to account number 13 29 28 60 at sort code 09-01-28.

This is a Santander account, so I tipped off the bank. Officials there thanked The Mail on Sunday, saying: ‘We are always grateful to receive information about suspected fraudulent accounts. We will act swiftly to investigate and block accounts where appropriate.’

Meanwhile, at the genuine Capricorn, director Stuart Dixon told me: ‘We have had several calls from the public. We have notified the regulator and sent them a series of documents.

‘I am hoping the Financial Conduct Authority will shut down these guys. They are not connected with us in any way at all.’

Neither the regulator nor the fake Capricorn responded to invitations to comment.

Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?

Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.

Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?

We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.

Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group

 

July 28, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

Related news

  •  The Latest: Tesla shares fall as Musk says stress takes toll

    The Latest: Tesla shares fall as Musk says stress takes toll

    surprising development surrounding CEO Elon Musk.</p><p> Musk admitted in an interview with The New York Times that stress is taking a heavy toll on him. The company has been under pressure to increase production of its Model 3 sedan, and Musk said that he was working up to 120 hours a week and sometimes takes Ambien to get to sleep.</p><p> Musk raised a ruckus last week when he tweeted that he might take Tesla private. The tweet reportedly has spurred an investigation by securities regulators.</p><p> Tesla shares fell 3.6 percent to $323 in early trading.</p><p> Electric car maker Tesla's CEO Elon Musk has admitted in a wide-ranging interview with The New York Times that stress is taking a heavy toll in what he calls an "excruciating year."</p><p> In the newspaper's account of the interview, published Friday, Musk said he was working up to 120 hours a week and sometimes takes Ambien to get to sleep.</p><p> Musk stood by his tweet last week saying he might take Tesla private.</p><p> Reports say government regulators have subpoenaed Tesla as they dig deeper into his disclosure of the potential buyout.</p><p> The subpoena signals regulators are investigating if Musk was telling the truth in his tweet about have financing locked up for a deal that analysts have estimated would require $25 billion to $50 billion.</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  •  Markets Right Now: Stocks open lower on Wall Street

    Markets Right Now: Stocks open lower on Wall Street

    es local):</p><p> Stocks are opening mostly lower on Wall Street, following a big gain the day before, after several companies issued weak earnings or forecasts.</p><p> Chipmakers Applied Materials and Nvidia both fell sharply in early trading Friday after warning of weaker results ahead. Applied Materials fell 8.8 percent and Nvidia fell 2.7 percent.</p><p> Farm equipment maker Deere fell 2.4 percent after warning of higher costs.</p><p> The S&P 500 index fell 4 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,836.</p><p> The Dow Jones Industrial Average slipped 9 points to 25,547. The Nasdaq composite fell 31 points, or 0.4 percent, to 7,778.</p><p> Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.85 percent.</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  •  The Latest: Tesla shares fall as Musk says stress takes toll

    The Latest: Tesla shares fall as Musk says stress takes toll

    surprising development surrounding CEO Elon Musk.</p><p> Musk admitted in an interview with The New York Times that stress is taking a heavy toll on him. The company has been under pressure to increase production of its Model 3 sedan, and Musk said that he was working up to 120 hours a week and sometimes takes Ambien to get to sleep.</p><p> Musk raised a ruckus last week when he tweeted that he might take Tesla private. The tweet reportedly has spurred an investigation by securities regulators.</p><p> Tesla shares fell 3.6 percent to $323 in early trading.</p><p> Electric car maker Tesla's CEO Elon Musk has admitted in a wide-ranging interview with The New York Times that stress is taking a heavy toll in what he calls an "excruciating year."</p><p> In the newspaper's account of the interview, published Friday, Musk said he was working up to 120 hours a week and sometimes takes Ambien to get to sleep.</p><p> Musk stood by his tweet last week saying he might take Tesla private.</p><p> Reports say government regulators have subpoenaed Tesla as they dig deeper into his disclosure of the potential buyout.</p><p> The subpoena signals regulators are investigating if Musk was telling the truth in his tweet about have financing locked up for a deal that analysts have estimated would require $25 billion to $50 billion.</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  • 
	Plans to reopen mothballed Manston Airport in Kent move a step closer

    Plans to reopen mothballed Manston Airport in Kent move a step closer

    have moved a step closer.</p><p>The Government’s Planning Inspectorate has launched an inquiry into proposals by Riveroak Strategic Partners to reopen mothballed Manston Airport. </p><p>The airfield has been closed for four years but Riveroak believe it could be used to divert cargo away from congested airports. </p><p>Mothballed: Manston Airport on the Isle of Thanet in Kent has been closed for four years</p><p>Roger Gale, North Thanet MP, said: ‘We are desperately short of runway capacity in the South East and Manston offers an opportunity.’</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  • 
	Brewdog told to pay £12,000 compensation to former employee

    Brewdog told to pay £12,000 compensation to former employee

    pensation to a former employee who was sacked after telling the company he was about to be declared legally blind.</p><p>James Ross, 47, who worked in the Aberdeen brewer's packaging department, suffers with Stargardt disease, which causes progressive vision loss. </p><p>After he refused to move to a different department last year, claiming the new role would be more difficult with his condition, Brewdog fired him.</p><p>Not cool: Judge Nick Hosie described Brewdog's actions as 'astonishing</p><p>Employment judge Nick Hosie described Brewdog's actions as 'astonishing'.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  • 
	Rio Tinto hires bankers to sell its £4.7bn Canadian iron-ore operations

    Rio Tinto hires bankers to sell its £4.7bn Canadian iron-ore operations

    l its £4.7billion Canadian iron-ore operations, according to reports.</p><p>Possible bidders for the 58.7 per cent stake in Iron Ore Company of Canada include ArcelorMittal and Teck, Sky News reported.</p><p>Rio is also said to be considering floating the division on the Toronto Stock Exchange. The outlook for the commodity is uncertain as major buyer China is expected to increasingly rely on recycled iron.</p><p>Rio is also said to be considering floating the division on the Toronto Stock Exchange</p><p>The sale, which would be one of its largest for years, comes as it concentrates on iron ore assets in Western Australia. Its first-half profits grew 12 per cent to £3.4billion.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  • 
	B&Q is basking in our scorching summer as heatwave boosts sales  

    B&Q is basking in our scorching summer as heatwave boosts sales  

    isher</p><p>The summer heatwave saw paddling pools sell out and fans fly off the shelves at B&amp;Q owner Kingfisher.</p><p>The DIY group, which also owns Screwfix in the UK, has seen business bounce back following a slump during the icy blast earlier in the year.</p><p>Same store sales at Kingfisher were 1.6 per cent higher in the three months to July than they were in the same period last year. That followed a 4 per cent fall in the previous three months when the Beast from the East struck.</p><p>With the mercury rising, sales of hosepipes and sprinklers at B&amp;Q soared 400 per cent, while sales of barbecue charcoal leapt 75 per cent.</p><p>The home improvement chain also managed to shift 305,000 fans and sold out of more than 60,000 paddling pools. Other top sellers included garden furniture, outdoor pots, decking and fencing. Overall, sales at B&amp;Q rose 3.6 per cent during the three months.</p><p>Screwfix, which sells tools for tradesmen, continued to be the jewel in Kingfisher’s crown with sales up 5.5 per cent. But Kingfisher’s French arm struggled, with sales at home improvement chain Castorama down 3.8 per cent.</p><p>B&amp;Q’s improved sales come as its main rival, Homebase, prepares to close 42 stores. But despite strong sales for summer products at B&amp;Q, analysts said the warm weather was masking the chain’s true performance. </p><p>George Salmon, of Hargreaves Lansdown, said: ‘The sales figures are more a function of a scorching summer than of any underlying progress.’</p><p>Véronique Laury, chief executive at Kingfisher, said it was taking action to improve Castorama’s performance ‘with the benefits expected to come through in the second half’.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  • 
	BHS auditor PwC shamed over pension fees 

    BHS auditor PwC shamed over pension fees 

    Sir Philip Green on his company’s finances, according to a damning report.</p><p>Accountants were in line to collect more fees the more workers they were able to persuade to change their pension benefits, the accounting watchdog said.</p><p>Both PwC’s and the Pensions Regulator’s guidance says such fees – known as contingency fees – should not be charged.</p><p>PwC broke pension rules while advising Sir Philip Green on his company’s finances, says report</p><p>Former pensions minister Baroness Altmann said: ‘It’s an outrage. Contingent charging should have no place in a transaction that is supposed to be in members’ interests.’</p><p>The alleged arrangement emerged as part of a Financial Reporting Council report into PwC’s audit of Green’s retail chain BHS before it was sold for £1 to serial bankrupt Dominic Chappell in 2015. </p><p>It went bust one year later. PwC has been fined £10million for shortcomings in the audit including failing to warn of the risk that BHS might be on the brink of the collapse.</p><p>The FRC said PwC also worked on a pensions ‘incentive exercise’ for Green’s wider Taveta Group.</p><p>It is believed this involved members being offered a transfer out of the scheme to help reduce liabilities. Details have not been confirmed.</p><p>The FRC said: ‘The respondents’ fees for the pensions incentive exercise were related to and contingent upon the number of pension scheme members accepting the incentive. Contingency fee arrangements of that nature contravened guidance issued by the Pensions Regulator and by PwC itself.’</p><p>The report looks at PwC’s audit of Green’s retail chain BHS before it was sold for £1</p><p>It is understood the exercise was not connected to BHS, whose scheme had a £571million black hole when the firm collapsed. An incentive exercise usually involves an employer trying to reduce risk or cost from a scheme by offering members the option to transfer out of the scheme or modify their benefits.</p><p>The Pensions Regulator worries that members may be disadvantaged by such exercises, especially if they do not get to make informed choices.</p><p>Altmann added: ‘If they were offering people more than a fair deal that might be fine, but if they were offering people more than a fair deal one has to wonder why they thought they needed incentives to recommend the transfer.’</p><p>PwC said: ‘Although described as a contingency fee, our fee for this work was actually less than if charged at our hourly rate. There has been no suggestion from the FRC that our objectivity was impaired and the quality of the work has not been called into question.’</p><p>Taveta had not commented last night. The Pensions Regulator declined to comment.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  • 
	MAGGIE PAGANO: Tax sales and scrap business rates to save our High Street

    MAGGIE PAGANO: Tax sales and scrap business rates to save our High Street

    gh go shopping?’ Well, now could be a good time to update the phrase to ‘the tough go shopping online’.</p><p>An even more interesting nugget in the ONS numbers was that online spending through department store websites was also at a new high of 18.2 per cent of total sales.</p><p>On the rise: Online sales now account for nearly £1 in every £5 spent online</p><p>The blazing heat and the World Cup may have kept shoppers off the High Street but it did not stop them treating themselves: retail sales for July bounced up by 0.7 per cent on the previous month, an increase due entirely to online shopping and some discounting.</p><p>We are all multi-channel now. Buying online through our phones or laptops via social media sites such as Instagram – which hook you up to the millions of shopping sites such as Amazon – is now ubiquitous.</p><p>So too is buying online from bricks and mortar stores, which as the latest figures show, is of increasing importance to sales. With the spread of the blogging ‘influencers’ on channels such as Instagram – whose recommendations can move millions of products in a matter of hours – online shopping looks set to soar.</p><p>That’s why Philip Hammond is right to address the march of online retail at the expense of the High Street. But his proposal for an ‘Amazon tax’ is ill-conceived on many fronts and should be dumped before it gets any further traction. He needs to go to the root cause of the problem.</p><p>Just as shoppers are agnostic about where they buy from, so should the tax system be agnostic about where sales come from.</p><p>'It would also be foolish of Hammond to single out companies such as Amazon at such a critical time for the UK economy', says Maggie Pagano</p><p>Most retailers today are multi-channel, just as we customers are. Amazon, for example, owns Whole Foods stores, while high street shops such as Marks &amp; Spencer are closing stores and driving business online.</p><p>The reality is that we are still at the dawn of the online revolution, and no one can predict how it will pan out. It would also be foolish of Hammond to single out companies such as Amazon at such a critical time for the UK economy. This would give out the wrong signals for others wanting to invest in the digital economy.</p><p>For example, Amazon’s latest idea is for a new price comparison site for house and car insurance in the UK.</p><p>Since the UK has one of the world’s most developed digital networks with some of the world’s most skilled online techies, it would be crazy to strangle that growth.</p><p>The digital economy is now 10 per cent of GDP, double that of the Group of 20 leading industrial nations. It’s true there is unfair competition between the high street retailers and internet giants. Amazon halved its tax bill in the UK last year yet still pays less in tax than M&amp;S does on business rates. That’s not right.</p><p>But rather than go for a knee-jerk Amazon tax, Hammond should be bolder and more ambitious in his thinking. He should consider a transactions tax for everyone – maybe one that links sales to geographic area where the products are bought – and consider scrapping business rates altogether.</p><p>Now that would help high street shops, whereas an online tax would do nothing to rescue them. The Chancellor must go back to the drawing board – his digital one.</p><p>The loss of so many lives in the Genoa bridge collapse is tragic. But it would be a greater tragedy if the disaster leads to more political point-scoring rather than fixing Italy’s creaking infrastructure.</p><p>It’s already open war between Autostrade per l’Italia, the toll operator partly owned by the Benetton family, and the government, which is threatening to revoke its licence without waiting for criminal proceedings.</p><p>More worrying is how the government’s commitment to following EU budget rules is going to square with the finance minister’s new pledge to make public investment in infrastructure a priority ‘for which there will be no budgetary constraints’. Ouch.</p><p>Investors are already spooked. Two-year bond yields have tripled in the past month over fears for Italy’s short-term financial stability. They will be more spooked when September’s budget talks get going.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 August 17, 2018
  • 
	More and more houses are coming from office block conversions

    More and more houses are coming from office block conversions

    s dramatically. It's bad news for business but might it be good news for homeowners Could those redundant shops and offices become happy homes?</p><p>When it comes to conversions, no building is out of bounds. The Church of England calculates about 20 of its churches are sold off each year - most become homes; since 2010 more than 450 libraries have closed across Britain; 2,900 bank branches have shut in the past three years; and Network Rail intends to sell off 4,455 arches</p><p>There are opportunities galore for those with imagination.</p><p>Waterfront: The scramble for new housing has led to more inventive ways to create homes</p><p>In Margate, Kent, the promenade loos are for sale with proposals to build a three bedroom, two bathroom home. It's priced at £290,000 (struttandparker.com) - before demolition or conversion costs. Also in Kent, Canterbury has seen substantial change with plenty of buildings becoming redundant and ripe for conversion.</p><p>Boots the chemist in the centre has partially become flats, while a former tannery and theatre have been transformed. 'We're handling a former hall, old shops, former barracks, old churches, old cinemas,' says Edward Church of Strutt &amp; Parker. </p><p>'Turning offices into swanky flats is a big draw for a growing town looking for flexible housing solutions.' While almost any building can be converted, there are practical constraints. </p><p>Some old stores have to be gutted as their ceilings need space for air conditioning, improved fire prevention features and more wiring. </p><p>Planners usually insist banks have their security devices and vaults removed, which can be costly. 'Converting older buildings like schools and hospitals (which may be listed) has a high build cost,' says Jonathan Lambert of Savills. But office blocks work a treat. </p><p>House builders have been given 'Permitted Development Rights' to turn them into homes without needing detailed planning. </p><p>As a result, between 2015 and the end of last year 30,575 homes in England were created from redundant offices. One of the biggest locations for these conversions is Bristol, where a million square feet of offices have become student pods, rental apartments and even hotel rooms. </p><p>The developer Urban Splash - which converted the Fort Dunlop tyre factory in the West Midlands and old silk mills in Bradford into homes - has now outlined plans to convert Plymouth's 14-storey Civic Centre into 144 apartments above bars, restaurants and cafe conversions are important, not just to provide new homes.</p><p>'Boarded-up premises attract graffiti and bring down the value of homes near by,' says Robert Adley, a Home Counties buying agent. </p><p>For individuals seizing the chance to convert, there are advantages. You can reclaim some VAT from the work (see the VAT refunds section at gov.uk) and estate agents say good-quality conversions of more unusual buildings with a local history often sell for a premium. </p><p>On a larger scale, some of Britain's biggest conversions will begin in London in the next few years following this month's announcement that Billingsgate, New Spitalfields and Smithfield markets are to be consolidated under one roof, freeing up the historic buildings for homes.</p><p>Hertfordshire: Four bedrooms, beautiful views and large gardens.</p><p>Once a Victorian congregational chapel, this is now a home right on the village green in Sandon, near Baldock. It has four bedrooms, beautiful views and large gardens. </p><p>Wiltshire: a roof terrace with views to Salisbury Cathedral.</p><p>Start a new chapter of your life in this three bedroom duplex apartment which was once a city centre bookshop. There's even a roof terrace with views to Salisbury Cathedral. </p><p>The General is the city's former hospital, now transformed into a collection of one, two and three bed apartments — contemporary living in a listed landmark in the city centre. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 August 17, 2018

Comments

Earn free bitcoin