The seasonal lattes that contain more sugar than a can of COKE

As the season starts to change, many look forward to wrapping up and indulging in a festive latte from their favourite coffee shop.

Yet these delicious, warming drinks are secret sugar-bombs that can contain more sugar than a can of coke.

Below are three of the worst offenders, which could cause you to pile on the pounds if you over indulge in the upcoming festive season.

Costa's newly launched 'Bonfire spiced family' includes a latte, hot chocolate and cold coffee, all with 'rich caramel toffee' and 'crunchy caramel'. A small Bonfire hot chocolate made with whole milk contains a staggering 36.9g, or nine teaspoons, of sugar and 311 calories

Costa's newly launched 'Bonfire spiced family' includes a latte, hot chocolate and cold coffee, all of which are made with 'rich caramel toffee' and 'crunchy caramel'.

Although it sounds delicious, a small Bonfire hot chocolate made with whole milk contains a staggering 36.9g, or nine teaspoons, of sugar and 311 calories. This one drink alone therefore takes a person over their recommended daily sugar limit.

A standard-sized can of Coca Cola contains 35g, or eight teaspoons, of sugar.  

Starbuck's 'fall favourite' Pumpkin Spice Latte has notes of 'pumpkin, cinnamon, nutmeg and clove', topped with whipped cream.

The drink can be prepared with a variety of different dairy-free milks, with a small almond 'mylk' variety being the least sugary with 20.6 grams, or five teaspoons, of sugar.

Opting for the large oat milk option, however, will have you consuming a staggering 48.9g, or 12 teaspoons, in that one drink alone.

Starbuck's 'fall favourite' Pumpkin Spice Latte contains notes of 'pumpkin, cinnamon, nutmeg and clove', topped with whipped cream. Opting for the large oat milk option will have you consuming a staggering 48.9g, or 12 teaspoons, in that one drink alone

And Gregg's Pumpkin Spice Latte, which comes topped with a 'golden biscuit crumb', includes 31g, or seven teaspoons, of sugar, as well as 240 calories. 

A Costa Coffee spokesperson told MailOnline: 'The Bonfire Spiced Hot Chocolate is one of a range of drinks that we have launched as part of our autumn campaign. 

'All our barista-made drinks are made to order and customers can opt for skimmed milk, select from a range of no-added sugar syrups and choose smaller sizes if they wish. We only offer our Bonfire Spiced Hot Chocolate in our smallest Primo size.' 

A Greggs spokesperson added: 'Our limited edition Pumpkin Spice Latte caters for customers who want to enjoy an occasional seasonal treat.

'Our customers can of course choose to enjoy one of our healthier drink options instead should they wish to.'

Gregg's Pumpkin Spice Latte includes 31g, or seven teaspoons, of sugar, and 240 calories

Starbucks argued it has already cut its Pumpkin Spiced Latte's calorie content by 10 per cent and sugar by 13 per cent since last year, which includes naturally-occurring sugars found in milk.

A spokesperson added: 'Customers can also choose from many ways to lower the sugar and calories in their drinks, including choosing no whipped cream or enjoying our smallest size, Short. 

'We also make nutritional information available on our menu boards and website to help our customers make informed choices that are right for them.' 

This comes after research released earlier this found children in England have reached their recommended amount of added sugar for the year by the end of May.

Yet data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey reveals, on average, children are consuming 52g a day, which is the equivalent of five Cadbury's Freddo bars.

Over the course of a year, this amounts to roughly 19,050g of added sugar - more than double the recommended 7,850g.

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September 14, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

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    Cancer survivor has welcomed his 'miracle' baby

    going to be a father the day before he was diagnosed with advanced Non Hodgkin's lymphoma.</p><p>Just a few weeks on, the sales assistant began 26 rounds of grueling chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which has left him unable to ever father a child again.</p><p>His 22-year-old girlfriend Maxine Campbell's bump grew while he endured the agonising treatment. By the time she was 37 weeks pregnant, Mr Thompson was given the all-clear.</p><p>Miss Campbell said: 'It's been the toughest but the happiest year of our lives. I am so relieved Simon is much better and Mateo being born marks a new chapter for us.'</p><p>Cancer survivor Simon Thompson welcomed his 'miracle' son Mateo last month. He discovered he was going to be a father the day before he was rushed to hospital where he was diagnosed with advanced lymphoma. He later started chemotherapy that has left him infertile </p><p>Mr Thompson battled guilt throughout his girlfriend Maxine Campbell's (pictured) pregnancy, saying 'I wanted to look after Maxine, but it ended up being the other way around'</p><p>Weeks after his diagnosis, he started 11 rounds of chemo and 15 radiotherapy sessions</p><p>Although overjoyed to be a father, Mr Thompson feels his cancer battle 'robbed' him of the excitement of being an expectant parent.</p><p>'Having your first child is supposed to be a happy and exciting time in any couples' lives and we feel that was robbed from us,' he said.</p><p>'While most mums and dads to be are excitedly picking out the nursery theme and buying babygrows, our impending arrival was almost the last thing on our minds.</p><p>'We'd be on cloud nine one minute and then seconds later remember what we were dealing with and it would bring us back down to earth with a thud. </p><p>'We were driving back and forth to hospital appointments and I was having chemotherapy and worrying about whether I was going to be around to see Maxine give birth.</p><p>'Maxine was terrified she was going to lose me and that our son would grow up without a dad.'</p><p>Although a stressful time, he credits his son for giving him the strength to fight his disease. </p><p>'Having Maxine and the baby to focus on while I was battling cancer willed me to beat the disease and get better for their sake,' he said.</p><p>'I just was desperate to be there. I was determined to see Maxine give birth and watch my little boy grow up. Maxine and the baby kept me strong.</p><p>'The chances of me surviving cancer were 60 per cent which sounds positive, but four in 10 people succumb to the disease so I knew I had to throw everything I had at it.'</p><p>Mr Thompson feels his cancer battle 'robbed' him of the excitement of preparing for fatherhood. Rather than feeling overjoyed at his partner's pregnancy, Mr Thompson worried over whether he would survive and if his son may be forced to grow up without a dad</p><p>Mr Thompson was given the all-clear eight months after his diagnosis, with his son Mateo Ian being born August 17 after Miss Campbell endured 40 hours of labour and a C-section</p><p>The youngster spent 10 days in intensive care due to him being born with fluid on his lungs and breathing difficulties. Mr Thompson said: 'Looking at him hooked up to machines and covered in wires was so hard. It reminded me of everything I'd just been through'</p><p>Although Mr Thompson's aggressive treatment means he will never father another child, he insists he is 'blessed'.</p><p>'We know we'll probably never be able to have any more children as the chemotherapy has made me infertile,' he said.</p><p>'But despite it all, we feel incredibly blessed to have our miracle, surprise baby after all we've been through.'</p><p>Mateo Ian was born August 17 after Miss Campbell endured 40 hours of labour and a C-section.</p><p>The youngster was in specialist care for 10 days, and required medication for fluid on the lungs and breathing difficulties.</p><p>'We weren't even allowed to hold him for the first 48 hours,' Mr Thompson said.</p><p>'Looking at him in his incubator, hooked up to machines and covered in wires was so hard. It reminded me of everything I'd just been through and being pumped with chemo.</p><p>'I told him he was strong like his daddy and that he'd pull through.' Mateo recovered and the family-of-three are together at home.</p><p>Despite his ill health, Mr Thompson tried hard to support Miss Campbell throughout her pregnancy, and managed to attend every one of her appointments and scans </p><p>Although Mateo may be their only child, they feel 'incredibly blessed to have our miracle baby'</p><p>Miss Campbell's pregnancy came as a surprise, with her having no idea her boyfriend would be rushed to hospital with a deadly disease the day after she proudly showed off her test result</p><p>Mr Thompson started to feel unwell in June last year after experiencing numbness in his face and severe toothache. Before long, a golf-ball sized lump developed inside his mouth.</p><p>After visiting his dentist and GP, and even being referred to an optician due to the swelling, his symptoms were dismissed as a dental abscess and he was prescribed antibiotics.</p><p>When Mr Thompson's symptoms failed to improve, with him dosing up on painkillers and numbing gel for months to get through the days, Miss Campbell, a former nanny, eventually dragged him to hospital.</p><p>'The pain become so severe, I just had to get some help,' he said.</p><p>'I assumed it was just a dental abscess and that it would go away naturally, but after months of agony I had no choice but to go to hospital.'</p><p>Like his father, Mateo pulled through and the family-of-three are now together at home </p><p>Miss Campbell described her pregnancy as 'the toughest but the happiest year of our lives'. After everything they have endured, she adds Mateo's arrival signals 'a new chapter' for them</p><p>While unwell, Miss Campell drove Mr Thompson to hospital and looked after him at home</p><p>At times in the pregnancy the pair felt 'on cloud nine', only to be brought 'down with a thud'</p><p>After arriving at A&amp;E, doctors immediately warned Mr Thompson it could be serious. He was diagnosed with stage 4 Non Hodgkin's lymphoma on December 18 last year.</p><p>Meanwhile, Ms Campbell only discovered she was three weeks pregnant the day before.</p><p>'Even though I heard the "C" word I didn't think it would be that,' Mr Thompson said.</p><p>In the new year, Mr Thompson started a course of 11 rounds of chemotherapy and 15 radiotherapy sessions.</p><p>He said: 'I wanted to look after Maxine and be there for her whilst she was pregnant, but it ended up being the other way around.</p><p>'She had to drive me to all of my hospital appointments and look after me when I was at home.'</p><p>Despite his ill health, Mr Thompson managed to attend all of Miss Campbell's pregnancy appointments and scans. 'Luckily her pregnancy was smooth-sailing,' he said.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 September 20, 2018
  • Model paid £2,500 to be diagnosed with common womb condition after NHS medics dismissed her

    Model paid £2,500 to be diagnosed with common womb condition after NHS medics dismissed her

    l dismissed the pain and were 'horrible' to her - despite debilitating pain in her pelvis and legs.</p><p>Claiming to have visited doctors and phoned NHS helpline 111 between 40 and 50 times in the summer of 2017, the former Miss England finalist gave in and sought private help.</p><p>She paid £2,500 for a laparoscopy – a procedure to examine the inside of the abdomen – and was told it was endometriosis which had left her unable to work.</p><p>The common condition causes the womb lining to grow outside of the womb, such as in the ovaries or fallopian tubes, and can cause pain, constipation or diarrhoea.</p><p>Miss Leyenda's condition was so advanced she had to have six months of hormone therapy before having an operation to remove the womb tissue.</p><p>The model, who has worked for haircare brands Wella and Schwartzkopf, will now need regular medical treatment for the rest of her life.</p><p>Kate Leyenda, a hair model who has worked for Wella and Schwartzkopf, paid £2,500 for a procedure to diagnose her with endometriosis because she could not get NHS help</p><p>Miss Leyenda suffered crippling pain around her pelvis between June and September last year, but struggled to find a doctor to help.</p><p>She claims, despite dozens of attempts to get help from the NHS, she was repeatedly told there was 'not an issue'.</p><p>It took paying to go privately to be diagnosed, with specialists at The Spire in Anlaby, a village near Hull, discovering she had endometriosis in October 17, 2017.</p><p>The diagnosis brought to an end to a summer of anguish in which the self-employed model could not work because of the pain.</p><p>She has now accused A&amp;E doctors at Hull Royal Infirmary of being 'horrible' to her, telling her they could find nothing wrong and to stop returning.</p><p>'I found the treatment at Hull Royal Infirmary horrible, and the GP wasn't great either,' said Miss Leyenda.</p><p>'The doctors at A&amp;E kept saying, "there is not an issue, why do you keeping coming back?" I didn't know what to do.'</p><p>Endometriosis is thought to affect as many as one in 10 women in the UK.</p><p>It can cause chronic pain, a lack of energy, make it harder to conceive or painful to have sex, and even cause disability in the worst cases.</p><p>Miss Leyenda says she has been diagnosed with stage four endometriosis – the most severe form of the condition – and will need treatment for the rest of her life. </p><p>Endometriosis cannot be cured and long-term management of the condition usually involves hormone treatment or surgery, as well as painkillers.</p><p>Hormone treatment can reduce levels of oestrogen in the body, because endometriosis is worsened by the hormone, and surgery is used to remove excess womb tissue which grows in places like the fallopian tubes or ovaries.</p><p>The pain meant the short hair model had to turn down work for four months last summer, having previously starred in Wella and Schwarzkopf adverts. </p><p>She had to rely on parents for financial support while she was out of work.  </p><p>The Spire referred her back to the NHS for follow-up treatment from endometriosis specialists at Castle Hill Hospital in East Riding of Yorkshire, one of 44 specialist units in the country.</p><p>Miss Leyenda's condition was so severe that she had to take six months of hormone injections to bring on the symptoms of menopause early before she could be operated on in April this year.</p><p>Despite the operation taking place less than six months ago, Miss Leyenda said she is already experiencing reoccurring pain.</p><p>'I had to have four months off work because I was literally going to A&amp;E every day, she said. 'I pretty much had 111 on speed dial at one stage.'</p><p>Miss Leyenda said her treatment at Hull Royal Infirmary was 'horrible' and the NHS did not help her with her condition for months, leading even her parents to doubt her</p><p>'The doctors were doubtful and saying I was lying, basically. I had to pay to get the operation to get diagnosed. </p><p>'The NHS said they didn't think I had [endometriosis] so they wouldn't pay. They were saying it could be stress or anxiety.</p><p>'If I hadn't paid for it and gone privately I might never have been diagnosed. </p><p>'The pain is already back so I will probably have to go for more treatment. It can feel like you are fighting a lost cause.'</p><p>Endometriosis occurs when cells in the lining of the womb are found elsewhere in the body. </p><p>Each month, these cells react in the same way as those in the womb; building up, breaking down and bleeding. Yet, the blood has no way to escape the body.</p><p>Symptoms include pain, heavy periods and fatigue, as well as a higher risk of infertility, and bowel and bladder problems.</p><p>Its cause is unknown but may be genetic, related to problems with the immune system or exposure to chemicals.</p><p>Treatment focuses on pain relief and improving quality of life, which may include surgery or hormone treatment.</p><p>The Miss England 2009 finalist is now looking to raise awareness of the condition, both in Hull and across the UK with the help of her MP, Emma Hardy.</p><p>Hull has a specialist nurse based at Castle Hill Hospital but Miss Leyenda, while praising the 'fantastic' care given to her after diagnosis, said getting in contact could be difficult because the demand is high for the services of one nurse.</p><p>Miss Leyenda said: 'I can't believe it took so long [to get diagnosed]. </p><p>'For me it didn't take as long as for some people, so I'm lucky, but how can doctors say nothing is wrong with you when there is?</p><p>'I had support from my mum and dad while I was off work but even they were questioning it because the doctors were saying nothing was wrong with me. </p><p>Labour's MP for Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle, Ms Hardy, said Miss Leyenda's story 'chimed' with her after campaigning against the use of vaginal mesh, an implant that left some women in constant pain and even disabled.</p><p>'It feels like women have to battle when it comes to their health,' said Ms Hardy.</p><p>'Like with mesh, there hasn't been enough research into endometriosis. </p><p>'There are only 44 specialist centres in the UK and there is only one specialist nurse in the Humber.</p><p>'If you think that one in 10 women have some form of endometriosis, then this is a huge problem affecting so many women. </p><p>'This is a chronic condition to live with. There should be help available to support people who live with it.'  </p><p>Miss Leyenda is now teaming up with her MP for Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle, Emma Hardy, to raise awareness of the common but debilitating condition</p><p>The city MP said she would be seeking a meeting with education secretary Damian Hinds to urge him to include menstrual health as part of the curriculum in primary schools, so prepubescent girls can be taught about 'what a normal period is'</p><p> Miss Leyenda and her MP have arranged a 'Pink Pants' event at Bean and Nothingness café in Whitefriargate on Monday, October 1, from 10am to 11.30am.</p><p>The pair want to use it as a chance for women to learn more about endometriosis, its symptoms and 'ending the shame' of talking about women's health issues.</p><p>The Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs Hull Royal Infirmary and Castle Hill hospitals, said it was 'unable to comment on individual cases because of strict rules governing patient confidentiality'.</p><p>But consultant gynaecologist Kevin Phillips, an endometriosis specialist at the hospital trust, accepted women often faced delays of between five to seven years before diagnosis.</p><p>Mr Phillips said: 'Endometriosis can be a complex, debilitating condition which is not easy to treat. This is recognised nationally and internationally.</p><p>'Specialists are trying hard, with the help of charities, to get all medical professionals to recognise the possibility of this diagnosis at the earliest possible stage.</p><p>'Once a woman is referred to a gynaecologist, the diagnostic time is actually quite short but getting referred to a specialist in the first place can be difficult because of the complexity of the condition.'</p><p>As a specialist endometriosis centre, Castle Hill Hospital treats women from all over Yorkshire and Lincolnshire.</p><p>To maintain its status as a specialist centre, the trust employs a dedicated endometriosis specialist nurse and has dedicated surgeons to carry out the 'complex' procedures.</p><p>Mr Phillips said: 'Once women are diagnosed with endometriosis, we can offer them the best treatment possible because we know this is a condition which impacts very severely on a woman's life.' </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 September 20, 2018
  • Latest stop smoking campaign includes an online guide to where your nearest e-cigarette shop is

    Latest stop smoking campaign includes an online guide to where your nearest e-cigarette shop is

    icial figures show as health chiefs predict the end of the killer habit is in sight.</p><p>Public Health England estimates only one in ten people will still be smokers in five years and the nation could become smoke-free by 2030.</p><p>The prediction comes as the body launched its annual Stoptober campaign, encouraging smokers to join a mass quit attempt next month.</p><p>TV host Jeremy Kyle - a smoker of 35 years - has even been enlisted to give his public backing to vaping saying it was 'really helping' him to stay smoke free.</p><p>As part of the campaign, health chiefs are sending smokers to controversial vaping shops despite growing fears over safety.</p><p>Public Health England estimates only one in ten people will still be smokers in five years and the nation could become smoke-free by 2030 </p><p>PHE's campaign includes a new website that directs people to an online guide to e-cigarette sellers in their local area.</p><p>They are asked to complete an online questionnaire about their smoking habits before clicking on a link to find their 'local specialist vape shop'. </p><p>PHE revealed more than a million smokers have kicked the habit since 2014 - with 400,000 in England alone last one.</p><p>It said smoking rates among adults in the country are on track to fall to 10 per cent by 2023. They are currently at 14.9 per cent.</p><p>England has the second lowest smoking rates in Europe and Duncan Selbie, chief executive of PHE, last week said he wants them to fall further to five per cent.</p><p>The decision to link up with the vaping industry comes just days after a PHE advisor quit over the organisation's partnership with the alcohol industry's Drinkaware.</p><p>Scientists last night criticised the government health body for promoting the sales of 'unproven products', many of which are made by the tobacco industry.</p><p>They warned while e-cigarettes are generally thought to be less harmful than cigarettes, studies have linked their use to heart disease and cancer.</p><p>Professor Martin McKee, of the London School of Hygiene &amp; Tropical Medicine, said the endorsement is further proof England is 'out of step' with the rest of the world.</p><p>He said: 'Only a week after being criticised for its partnership with an alcohol industry funded organisation it is now being reported that PHE is promoting sales of unproven products from the tobacco industry.</p><p>'This coincides with the US Food and Drug Administration responding vigorously to new evidence of a rapid increase in their use among adolescents. England's approach to vaping is raising eyebrows abroad.'</p><p>As part of the campaign, health chiefs are sending smokers to controversial vaping shops despite growing fears over safety </p><p>Officials are also encouraging smokers not to 'go cold turkey' as the method may hamper a person's chance of successfully quitting.</p><p>Vaping is endorsed as part of the new 'Personal Quit Plan' which asks people to enter their postcode before displaying shops with names including Vampire Vaping, The Puffin Hut and Totally Wicked.</p><p>PHE has long been criticised for its approach to e-cigarettes.</p><p>In 2015 it claimed in a landmark report that vaping was '95 per cent safe' - a claim that was widely criticised when it emerged that it originated with scientists in the pay of the e-cigarette industry.</p><p>The Lancet medical journal at the time warned that PHE had based a 'major conclusion' on an 'extraordinarily flimsy foundation'.</p><p>Twelve months ago PHE controversially promoted e-cigarettes for the first time in 30-second television advertisements as part of last year's quit smoking campaign.</p><p>The end of smoking is finally 'in sight', officials claimed in June 2017 following figures that suggested another drop in rates across the UK.</p><p>Just one in six adults now regularly light up cigarettes - with 680,000 having given up the habit completely in 2016.</p><p>The numbers of smokers dropped from 19.9 per cent in 2010 to just 15.5 per cent in 2016 in England alone, according to data from the Office for National Statistics.</p><p>Across all ages smoking prevalence is in decline, with the largest fall in 18-to-24 year olds, while e-cigarette use is on the rise in this age group.</p><p>Duncan Selbie, chief executive of Public Health England, said the UK has the second lowest smoking rate in Europe after Sweden, which proves that the Government's tobacco-control policies are effective.</p><p>However, it came in the same week that another official body - the clinical guidelines watchdog Nice - told GPs not to recommend e-cigarettes because there is limited evidence over whether they are safe.</p><p>An estimated 3.2 million adults use vaping devices in Great Britain but around half of current vapers still smoke as well, according to the latest data.</p><p>With up to two new vaping shops opening in the UK a day, they have been described as a blight on the high street.</p><p>A study by the Royal Society of Public Health last year found nine of ten retailers happily sold e-cigarettes to people who had never smoked - contravening their own retail guidelines.</p><p>They found many promoted the devices as lifestyle accessories rather than smoking cessation aids, often those owned by tobacco giants such as Philip Morris's IQOS.</p><p>Earlier this year, a panel of lung experts described vaping as a 'one-way bridge' to smoking tobacco and said it could spark a health crisis in decades to come.</p><p>But PHE defended the move, saying only independent e-cigarettes shops are listed on the website, by the Independent British Vape Trade Association.</p><p>Dr Jenny Harries, deputy medical director at Public Health England, said: 'As well as vape shops, we work with a large number of commercial businesses to deliver Stoptober including pharmacies and supermarkets.</p><p>'Members of the IBVTA are not owned or linked in any way to the tobacco industry and are subject to a code of conduct that bans marketing to non-smokers or selling to under-18s.</p><p>'Specialist vape shops are ideally placed to advise people looking to use e-cigarettes to help them quit.</p><p>'And specialist stop smoking services can also provide additional support to quitters looking to use an e-cig, which will give them the best chance of quitting successfully.'</p><p>An electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) is a device that allows users to inhale nicotine by heating a vapour from a solution that contain nicotine, propylene and flavourings.</p><p>As there is no burning involved, there is no smoke like a traditional cigarette.</p><p>But while they have been branded as carrying a lower risk than cigarettes, an increasing swell of studies is showing health dangers.</p><p>E-cigarettes do not produce tar or carbon monoxide, but the vapor does contain some harmful chemicals.</p><p>Nicotine is the highly addictive chemical which makes it difficult for smokers to quit.  </p><p>Nearly three million people in Britain use e-cigarettes, and more than nine million Americans.</p><p>Battery-powered device containing nicotine e-liquid.</p><p>Very similar to normal e-cigarettes but with sleeker design and a higher concentration of nicotine.</p><p>Thanks to its 'nicotine salts', manufacturers claim one pod delivers the amount of nicotine as a pack of cigarettes.</p><p>It is composed of an e-cigarette (battery and temperature control), and a pod of e-liquid which is inserted at the end.</p><p>The liquid contains nicotine, chemicals and flavorings.</p><p>Like other vaping devices, it vaporizes the e-liquid.</p><p>It is known as a 'heat not burn' smokeless device, heating tobacco but not burning it (at 350C compared to 600C as normal cigarettes do).</p><p>The company claims this method lowers users' exposure to carcinogen from burning tobacco.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 September 20, 2018
  • Hospital Food You Can Get Excited About

    Hospital Food You Can Get Excited About

    ways.</p><p>On a Tuesday morning in March, chef Bruno Tison presided over a frenzied cook-off between teams from 16 health care facilities at Glen Cove Hospital on Long Island. Mr. Tison was hired last September by the nonprofit network Northwell Health to help transform the food service at the company’s 23 New York-area hospitals.</p><p>Chef Tison says that the bland, institutionalized fare typical of the health system lacks not just culinary distinction but often nutritional quality. For many patients, the lackluster food is just one more drawback of being in the hospital. </p><p>That’s a squandered opportunity, says Mr. Tison. The Michelin-starred chef argues that good food can offer a welcome break from the enforced monotony of a hospital stay, potentially boosting patient morale and speeding recovery. </p><p>“Many hospital chefs don’t have any culinary experience,” Mr. Tison said. “My job is to give them some guidance so that they can flourish in their position and really enjoy what they are doing.”</p><p>Thomas Mencaccini, who cooks at Long Island Jewish Hospital in Valley Stream, is among the chefs getting culinary tips from Mr. Tison. He was hurrying to complete his team’s seared scallops with roasted leeks and a citrus salad before the closing bell. “It’s bringing me back to that rush of cooking in a restaurant, getting things ready in time, hitting the ground running,” he said after spooning the browned scallops from the skillet. </p><p> The competitive pressures that drive restaurant chefs to excel have typically not existed in health care facilities, where the bar has been set uninspiringly low, Mr. Mencaccini said. Moreover, hospital chefs often have to function with meager food budgets. They also have to produce a variety of clinically appropriate meals for people suffering from different illnesses. </p><p>In the past, Mr. Mencaccini notes, the job of a hospital chef used to be more about heating pre-made mixes than actual cooking. Frozen burgers and chicken wings were deep fried, and foods in cans and sacks were reconstituted for hastily prepared meals. Now, they’ve scrapped the deep-fryer at LIJ, and they make all their meals from scratch with fresh, often organic, ingredients. “We want to give people the comforting experience of a home-cooked meal,” Mr. Mencaccini said.</p><p>This approach has made a big difference at Plainview Hospital too, says chef Carol Hilly. “People come down to the kitchen for recipes,” said Ms. Hilly, a 35-year hospital cooking veteran. “A lot of heart goes into the food now. I feel better about my work, and I eat a lot better myself.”</p><p>While the pleasures of a good meal are gratifying, the real reason hospitals should offer better food is that nutrition is a pillar of good health, says Dr. David Eisenberg of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.</p><p>Dr. Eisenberg laments that only 27 percent of American medical schools teach the recommended 25 hours of nutrition, and even then the content is mostly biochemistry rather than “practical” advice about diet. As a rule, doctors are trained in “pathogenesis,” the origin of disease, rather than “salutogenesis,” the creation of health, Dr. Eisenberg said. He has been on a mission to boost “culinary literacy” by helping to develop teaching kitchens in hospitals throughout the United States. </p><p>“No hospital should be discharging a patient without giving them the tools they need to be successful, so that they don’t get readmitted” said Eric Sieden, director of food and nutritional services for Plainview and Syosset hospitals on Long Island. They now teach people things like what exactly a carb serving is, how to read food labels and the difference between high-fructose corn syrup and sugar. </p><p>The responsibility of a hospital does not end when a patient is discharged, said Stephen Bello, executive director of LIJ Valley Stream. In addition to running a community teaching kitchen, his hospital is the first in the Northwell system to start a “food pharmacy,” which provides bags of groceries based on a prescription that a physician writes when a person is discharged. Low-income patients who are deemed to be “food insecure” can come in weekly to receive free food to help them stay on diets designed to control chronic diseases.</p><p>While providing quality food can be costly, advocates like Mr. Bello say they save money in the long run by helping to cut health care expenditures. Since the health system started providing fresh unprocessed food, there has been a lot less waste, because patients are more satisfied and rarely request another meal. In the past, nearly 19 percent of all meals were returned and had to be replaced. </p><p>Still, challenges remain. Hospital kitchens are often antiquated and falling apart, Chef Tison said. Staff members are often leery of the changes in their accustomed cooking routines. </p><p>“I came here four months ago and they looked at me like I was the devil — the corporate chef is coming, what is he going to do to us,” said Mr. Tison as he stirred fresh-herbed chicken broth in a huge stainless steel pot in LIJ’s basement kitchen. “Now when I leave, they ask me when I am coming back. They say, ‘Chef, taste my mashed potatoes. What do you think?’”</p><p>But not everyone is on board. “There are still a lot of people in the health care system who believe that a hospital doesn’t need to have good food, doctors who feel that people come to get treatment, not great food,” the chef observed. “It will take time, but we will get there.”</p>

    1 September 20, 2018

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