Drugged up goats dangled from helicopter as authorities remove them from national park

Authorities in Washington have begun using helicopters and trucks to relocate hundreds of non-native mountain goats from Olympic National Park.

The effort is designed to move the animals back to a nearby region where they are native. 

The process will rid the park of the dangerous animals, which have attacked visitors, killing one in 2010. Officials also say the animals have a negative environmental impact.

Crews used tranquilizer darts and net guns to capture several animals this week at the park, located west of Seattle. The goats are among the first of an estimated 375 that will be captured, examined and reintroduced to the wild in the North Cascades, located in northern Washington.

The relocation project is estimated to leave between 275 and 325 goats in Olympic National Park. Those goats eventually will be shot and killed, according to park officials.

The goats were introduced to the area nearly a century ago. They are known to trample sensitive vegetation and act aggressively toward humans.

"With their sharp horns and powerful bodies, mountain goats can inflict significant and lethal injuries," park officials warned in 2016.

Between 2004 and 2016, the mountain goat population in the park has more than doubled, bringing new urgency to a problem that officials have struggled with for decades.

 

September 14, 2018

Sources: USA Today

Related news

  •  The Latest: Iran says US ally behind military parade attack

    The Latest: Iran says US ally behind military parade attack

    llied country supports the group that attacked a military parade on Saturday.</p><p> Rouhani said Sunday that the U.S. supports small nations in the southern Persian Gulf that in turn back the militants behind the attack. He did not identify the attackers. Arab separatists claimed the assault, which killed at least 25 people and wounded more than 60, and Iranian officials appear to have accepted the claim.</p><p> Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the UAE view Iran as a regional menace and have long accused it of meddling in other countries' affairs. Iran backs militant groups across the region.</p><p> Iran has summoned diplomats from Britain, Denmark and the Netherlands over allegedly harboring "members of the terrorist group" that launched an attack on a military parade in the country's southwest.</p><p> A statement early Sunday from Iran's Foreign Ministry also quoted ministry spokesman Bahram Qasemi as saying Danish and Dutch diplomats were told Iran "already warned" their governments about this.</p><p> The statement also criticized Britain over a Saudi-linked, Farsi-language satellite channel immediately airing an interview with an Ahvazi separatist claiming the attack.</p><p> Saturday's attack in Ahvaz killed at least 25 people and wounded over 60.</p><p> Arab separatists in the region claimed the assault and Iranian officials believe they carried it out. The Islamic State group also claimed the attack, but initially offered incorrect information about it and provided no proof.</p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  • Dominican Republic earthquake: Tourists feel hotel SHAKING as 5.2-magnitude quake STRIKES

    Dominican Republic earthquake: Tourists feel hotel SHAKING as 5.2-magnitude quake STRIKES

    isa, with a depth of 14km, at 5.45am UTC this morning (6.45am BST).</p><p>An estimated 4.0 million people live in the area affected by the quake, with locals and tourists send into a frenzied panic.</p><p>Santiago - some 80km from the earthquake's centre - was ome of the key areas where the tremor was felt.</p><p>A USGS map shows a number of reports of shaking in the Santiago area.</p><p>Some locals and tourists took to social media following the earthquake's strike.</p><p>Twitter user Mills posted: "Anyone else just feel an #earthquake in Santiago, Dominican Republic?!"</p><p>The Dominican Republic is a popular&nbsp;holiday hotspot among Brits, where thousands of tourists flock to each year.</p><p>Hotels within the earthquake's range reportedly shook at the height of the tremor.</p><p>The large quake was also felt in neighbouring Haiti, which was devastated by a catastrophic earthquake in 2010.</p><p> See today's front and back pages, download the newspaper, order back issues and use the historic Daily Express newspaper archive. </p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  •  Iran-backed militias accused of reign of fear in Iraqi Basra

    Iran-backed militias accused of reign of fear in Iraqi Basra

    at her phone and flicking through her Instagram account when she looked up to find herself in an unusual location. The taxi driver had turned into an alley.</p><p> She yelled and tried to open the door, but the driver had locked it. The taxi swerved into a courtyard where three masked men were waiting.</p><p> "They immediately told me, 'We'll teach you a lesson. Let it be a warning to other protesters'," Youssif said in an interview several days after the incident.</p><p> The men slapped and beat her and pulled off her Islamic headscarf, she said. "At the end, they grabbed me by my hair and warned me not to take part in the protests before blindfolding me and dumping me on the streets," she said, her cheeks still bruised.</p><p> Angry Basra residents have repeatedly taken to the streets in recent weeks to protest failing government services, including water contamination that sent thousands to hospitals.</p><p> Earlier this month, protests turned violent when demonstrators attacked and torched government offices, the headquarters of the Iranian-backed militias and Iran's consulate in Basra — in a show of anger over what many residents perceive as Iran's outsized control over local affairs.</p><p> The events in Basra reflect the growing influence of the militias, which played a major role in retaking Iraqi territory from Islamic State militants, who are Sunni Muslims.</p><p> Shortly after IS militants captured much of northern and western Iraq in 2014, tens of thousands of Shiite men answered a call-to-arms by the top Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani.</p><p> Many volunteers were members of Iran-backed militias active since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein, while others formed new groups. These fighters are credited with helping government forces defeat the extremists. But during the war, the militiamen were also accused by Sunnis and rights groups of abuses against the Sunni community, including killings, torture and destruction of homes.</p><p> Buoyed by victory against IS, some of the most feared Shiite militias took part in the May national elections and their list — Fatah — won 48 seats in the 329-seat parliament.</p><p> Fatah and other factions formed a wider Iran-backed coalition in parliament earlier this month and will likely be tasked with forming the new government.</p><p> In Basra, some alleged the militias were working with local authorities to quell the protests — a charge denied by Bassem al-Khafaji, head of Sayyed al-Shuhada, one of several Basra militias.</p><p> He said threats and intimidation of protesters were "individual acts," but not the result of a central directive.</p><p> "Our order for all the factions in Basra ... is not to confront the protesters who burned down the offices of the militias," al-Khafaji said, arguing that the militias are trying to prevent more bloodshed.</p><p> He accused infiltrators of turning the protests violent and said the alleged saboteurs must be dealt with by the security agencies.</p><p> Some militia leaders in Basra accused protesters of colluding with the U.S., which has long worked to curb Iranian influence in Iraq.</p><p> A local leader of a prominent militia vowed to retaliate.</p><p> "We have pictures of those who burned down our headquarters and they will pay dearly," he said on condition of anonymity in line with his group's rules for speaking to the media. "We will not let them attack us again and if they do we'll open fire. That's what we've agreed on, all of us."</p><p> The government has said protesters' demands are legitimate, but claims infiltrators were behind the violence.</p><p> A senior official in the Interior Ministry's intelligence service said dozens have been arrested since the protests began. He acknowledged that others may be held by political parties and their militias, but said his office has no way of tracking that. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.</p><p> Activist Naqeeb al-Luaibi said he has been able to track only 30 protesters detained by the security agencies. Of those, 19 were discharged and 11 remain under arrest. Al-Luaibi said he believes dozens of others are still being held but said it was difficult to track them.</p><p> Mahdi Salah Hassan, 26, said he was arrested by security forces from a protest tent in early August. He said he was handcuffed, blindfolded and initially held in a room with 33 other protesters.</p><p> During three days of violent interrogation, Hassan said he was slapped on the face, hit with a cable on his feet and back and hung by the arms from the ceiling.</p><p> Hassan said he was then transferred to two other lockups, each holding several dozen protesters. When they released him after six days, they told him "Don't take part in protests or you won't see the sun," he said. Still, he said he'll continue to protest.</p><p> Two other activists, Ahmed al-Wihaili and Sara Talib, both 23, said they were threatened.</p><p> Al-Wihaili said an anonymous caller warned him that "you only cost us the price of a bullet."</p><p> Talib said she came home one day to find her door open and her belongings strewn across the floor. During one protest, someone approached her and told her to go home because she was putting her life in danger.</p><p> Youssif, who wore white scrubs during the protests as a volunteer medic, said the beating left her shaken and that threats continue, but she won't be deterred.</p><p> "I'm taking to the streets for the sake of my town Basra, to get public services and to get rid of those militias and political parties," she said. "I'm not afraid of them. These militias will not deter me from going out until we change our life."</p><p> Associated Press writers Sinan Salaheddin in Baghdad and Sarah El Deeb in Beirut contributed.</p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  •  Pope to honor victims of Soviet and Nazi crimes in Baltics

    Pope to honor victims of Soviet and Nazi crimes in Baltics

    ffered and died during Soviet and Nazi occupations on the day the country remembers the near extermination of its centuries-old Jewish community during the Holocaust.</p><p> Francis began his second day in the Baltics by travelling to Lithuania's second city, Kaunas, where an estimated 3,000 Jews survived out of a community of 37,000 during the 1941-1944 Nazi occupation.</p><p> After Mass, Francis is to continue the remembrance with a visit later Sunday to a museum in the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius that is dedicated to the horrors of five decades of Soviet occupation.</p><p> He will also pray at the Vilnius Ghetto, which 75 years ago Sunday was finally destroyed and its remaining Jewish residents executed or sent off to concentration camps.</p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  • Tiger Woods is 18 holes away from historic win at Tour Championship

    Tiger Woods is 18 holes away from historic win at Tour Championship

    of the crowning achievements of his storied career.</p><p>Eighteen holes from his first PGA Tour title in more than five years.</p><p>On a bright, hot Saturday at East Lake Golf Club, Woods turned golf on its axis and turned a masterful start reminiscent of his best days of yesteryear into a three-shot lead heading into Sunday’s final round of The Tour Championship, the FedExCup finale.</p><p>Yes, this could happen. Yes, he could win again 17 months after his spine was fused. Yes, he’s back to being a major contender.</p><p>With every part of his game on point, Woods, who shared the 36-hole lead with world No. 1 Justin Rose, made birdie on six of his first seven holes, the lone exception coming at the par-3 second. He missed just one fairway and hit every green in those first seven holes and his iron play was impeccable. As was his putting stroke as the golf ball found the bottom of the cup after traveling 23 feet on the first, 8 feet on the third, 22 on the fourth, and then from 7, 6 and 5 feet on the next three holes.</p><p>The last birdie came after he rifled a 9-iron from a bunker 160 yards from the seventh green to 5 feet.</p><p>During those seven holes, it was vintage 2000 again, or 2001, or 2005 or 2006 or 2007 or 2008, the years he was an intimidating force who ruled over the game. In those seven holes, he reminded all of us how good he was and how good he can be again. In those seven holes, he was scary good, and the massive crowds were roaring their approval.</p><p>“Yeah, I got off to a nice start there,” Woods said with a big grin. “I made some nice putts. Good Lord. Other than No. 3, every putt was uphill, so it was nice. I felt like I could free-wheel it, and they went in.”</p><p>While Tiger tailed off the rest of the round compared to the start, he finished with a 5-under-par 65 — the low round of the day. He has worked himself into his first 54-hole lead since the 2013 WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, which was his last victory. He is 53-4 when he has at least a share of the lead after 54 holes. And the last time he squandered a lead after three rounds was the 2009 PGA Championship when Y.E. Yang toppled him.</p><p>With rounds of 65-68-65, Woods is at 12 under, three shots clear of Rory McIlroy (66) and Rose (68). It’s another three shots back to Kyle Stanley (67) and Jon Rahm (68). McIlroy will be paired with Woods in the final group Sunday.</p><p>“I dreamed as a little kid playing in the final group with Tiger in a big tournament,” McIlroy said. “He was the best in the world, of all time, and you dream of beating the best.</p><p>“But all I can do is worry about myself. It doesn't matter who it is I'm playing with. It's obviously exciting for the golf tournament. It's exciting for golf in general that he's up there. But for me, all I can do is concentrate on myself. The game is hard enough without looking at other people. I have to go out there, take care of my business, and hopefully that's good enough.”</p><p>Woods has gone through a lot of trial and error this year to get his game in shape to be good enough to win his 80th PGA Tour title. After fusion surgery to his spine 17 months ago, Woods worked his body back into shape and then started on his golf game.</p><p>After missing the cut in the Genesis Open in February, he realized he was healthy enough to add tournaments instead of subtracting them. At that moment, he knew he could put together a swing that would work against the best players in the world — and 22 of the top 25 are here this week.</p><p>He’s fiddled with equipment all year looking to match it up with his swing. A key moment came before the first FedExCup Playoffs event when he added loft and changed the shaft in his driver. Since then, it’s become a weapon again.</p><p>“I’ve gone through a lot this year to get myself to this point, and understanding and fighting my way through it, I'm certainly more equipped than I was in March because of what I've gone through,” Woods said. “It feels great to have worked my way into this spot. This has been a difficult setup. It's a golf course that's very easy to make bogeys, and it's difficult to make birdies. My game plan throughout the week has been very conservative.</p><p>“And occasionally I'll get hot for a couple holes and try and take advantage of it. It hasn't been real complicated.”</p><p>All week there’s been something different about Woods. There’s been a look about him, one screaming confidence, that he’s the Alpha Male once again. On a ball-strikers course that fits his game — he won here in 2007 and finished second in 2009 — he feels right at home. And he was in form, having finished in a tie for fourth in the BMW Championship, the third of four events in the playoffs.</p><p>And there’s something different about his position on the leaderboard after three rounds than at any time this year. He’s the one being chased.</p><p>In his previous six top-6 finishes, Woods, with the exception of the Valspar Championship, has had too much ground to make up in the final 18 holes. He was five back at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and while he got within one stroke of the lead after 69 holes, he fell into a tie for fifth.</p><p>He was six back in the Quicken Loans National and tied for fourth. He was four back in the British Open and tied for sixth after taking the outright lead on the back nine. He was four back at the PGA Championship before rallying to finish second. He was five back at the BMW Championship.</p><p>“Simple math says that if I play a clean card, the guys behind me have to shoot 67 to force it into extra (holes)," Woods said. “That helps. I don't have to shoot 63 or 64 and hope I get help. That's a big difference.</p><p>“This is a spot I'd much rather be in than certainly four or five back.”</p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  • The Royals should ‘REACH OUT’ to Meghan's family to end ‘ONGOING SORE', says Royal expert

    The Royals should ‘REACH OUT’ to Meghan's family to end ‘ONGOING SORE', says Royal expert

    cribed the relationship between the Royal family and Thomas Markle as &ldquo;an ongoing sore&rdquo; which &ldquo;really doesn&rsquo;t look good for the palace&rdquo;, in an exclusive interview with Express.co.uk</p><p>Mr Markle, who did not attend his daughter&rsquo;s wedding in May for medical reasons, has made a number of outspoken attacks on his treatment by the Royal family.</p><p>In July, he provocatively told ITV&rsquo;s Good Morning Britain that Princess Diana would have disapproved of his treatment and that Meghan has developed a &ldquo;sense of superiority&rdquo;.</p><p>Asked whether the Royals should do more to reach out to the Markle family, Dr Whitelock replied: &ldquo;Yes absolutely.</p><p>&ldquo;I think as soon as, or even before, the engagement was announced there should have been a kind of family liaison officer who would go to the Markle family and prepare and advise them.</p><p>&ldquo;I think it is just naivety that this family from America which has no knowledge or experience of Royal circles would somehow be able to manage it all.&rdquo;</p><p>Dr Whitelock went on to contrast the relationship with that achieved with Kate Middleton&rsquo;s family.</p><p>She claimed: &ldquo;It was always going to be a different prospect for Kate Middleton.</p><p>&ldquo;Her family were more typical for marrying into the Royal family.</p><p>&ldquo;I mean they were not aristocrats, but they were upper middle-class and they knew how these things worked.</p><p>&ldquo;They were not new to this in the way that the Markle family have been.&rdquo;</p><p>Dr Whitelock also discussed how the uneasy relationship has been handled by Royal courtiers.</p><p>She said: &ldquo;It does not look like they have particularly handled that part of the relationship.</p><p>&ldquo;Actually, the Markles are a different kind of family and that has not really been managed in a way.</p><p>&ldquo;I think the Palace really hopes that they can get back on track, that Meghan Markle&rsquo;s father does not continue being this issue that is being played out.&rdquo;</p><p>However, Dr Whitelock did note that Meghan had built up her own profile before marrying into the Royal family.</p><p>She explained: &ldquo;She had a career and a profile and a platform before she joined the Royal family, and her profile and platform was not dependent on her family.</p><p>&ldquo;She was a love match with Harry and her public profile was not because she was from a landed, well recognised family, it was because she was her own celebrity.</p><p>&ldquo;Meghan is a Duchess of a social media age.&rdquo;</p><p>Dr Whitelock has written several books on historic monarchs and has commentated on the contemporary Royal family on UK and international TV.</p><p>Her latest book is entitled, &lsquo;Elizabeth&rsquo;s Bedfellows: An Intimate History of the Queen&rsquo;s Court&rsquo;, and explores the reign of Elizabeth I.</p><p> See today's front and back pages, download the newspaper, order back issues and use the historic Daily Express newspaper archive. </p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  •  The Latest: No arrests after Maldives' elections-eve raid

    The Latest: No arrests after Maldives' elections-eve raid

    er an elections-eve raid of the presidential opposition candidate's main campaign office in Male.</p><p> A warrant for the raid obtained by The Associated Press cited police intelligence of possible vote-buying at the campaign office. The presidential candidate, Ibrahim Mohamed Solih, was not in the office during the hours-long raid.</p><p> The raid has cast a pall over Sunday's elections, widely seen as a referendum on the island nation's young democracy.</p><p> The opposition says it bolsters fears that the vote will be rigged in favor of the Maldives' strongman President Yameen Abdul Gayoom.</p><p> Both Gayoom and Solih voted in Male shortly after polls opened Sunday morning.</p><p> The polls close at 4 p.m. and election officials say results are expected after 10 p.m.</p><p> Voting has started in the Maldives in a presidential election that is widely seen as a referendum on the island nation's young democracy.</p><p> President Yameen Abdul Gayoom cast his ballot in the capital, Male, about 40 minutes after polls opened. Huge crowds flocked to closely guarded polling stations.</p><p> Gayoom has been criticized for cracking down on freedoms. He used his first term to consolidate power, jailing opponents, including his half brother, a former president, and two Supreme Court Justices, or forcing them into exile and asserting control over the courts.</p><p> Police raided the opposition presidential candidate's main campaign office on Saturday evening, citing a warrant to search for evidence of vote-buying.</p><p> Members of the opposition decried the raid, saying the election could be rigged in favor of Gayoom.</p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  •  Indonesia presidential contenders vow peaceful campaign

    Indonesia presidential contenders vow peaceful campaign

    idodo against former general Prabowo Subianto, who lost to Jokowi in 2014.</p><p> Dressed in traditional clothing, the candidates and their running mates paraded through central Jakarta on Sunday and released doves at a ceremony after reading out a peaceful campaign declaration.</p><p> Jokowi, the first Indonesian president from outside the country's elite, has picked a conservative cleric as his running mate, aiming to neutralize criticism that he is insufficiently Muslim.</p><p> He has a big lead over Prabowo in polls and Indonesia's recent hosting of the Asian Games further burnished his image.</p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  • Senate panel quietly investigating Kavanaugh assault claims amid testimony negotiations

    Senate panel quietly investigating Kavanaugh assault claims amid testimony negotiations

    ntious negotiations this week over whether Dr. Christine Blasey Ford would testify against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the Senate Judiciary Committee was investigating her claims by contacting people who may be able to shed light on what might have happened more than three decades ago. </p><p>Throughout the week, the committee reached out to several people who might have information about a house party in 1982 where Ford, a 51-year-old college professor, says she was sexually assaulted by Kavanaugh, a source with knowledge of the investigation told USA TODAY, adding several people have offered statements to the committee. </p><p>Among those who have been contacted: a friend of Ford, who USA TODAY isn't naming to protect her privacy because she is seemingly not connected to the confirmation process.</p><p>The committee reached out to the friend on Tuesday as someone who was possibly in attendance at the party where Ford alleges an inebriated Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed, groped her, put his hand over her mouth to stifle her screams and tried to remove her clothes. </p><p>Kavanaugh has repeatedly and categorically denied the allegations.</p><p>The committee asked the friend if she would agree to have a confidential phone call with minority and majority staff so she could be asked about the allegations against Kavanaugh, according to an email exchange obtained by USA TODAY. </p><p>But, it appears, the woman doesn't remember the party described by Dr. Ford. </p><p>Through her lawyer, the woman told the committee on Saturday that she does not know Kavanaugh and she didn't remember being at a party with him, emails show. </p><p>The only other person who has been publicly identified as being contacted by the committee is Mark Judge, a high school friend of Kavanaugh. Ford has said Judge witnessed the alleged assault. </p><p>Judge told the committee he has no memory of the incident and does not want to testify.</p><p>"I did not ask to be involved in this matter nor did anyone asked me to be involved," Judge said in a written statement forwarded to the committee by his attorney. "The only reason I am involved is that Dr. Christine Blasey Ford remembers me as the other person in the room during the alleged assault."</p><p>The correspondence reveals the behind-the-scenes work of the Republican-led committee as it attempts to investigate Ford's accusations, even though it could affect the outcome of Kavanaugh's appointment to the nation's highest court. </p><p>Ford's attorney, Debbie Katz, said it wasn't surprising that someone wouldn't remember events at a party from 30 years ago. </p><p>"As Dr Ford has said, she did not share her story publicly or with anyone for years following the incident with Judge Kavanaugh," Katz said in a statement, adding it was an "unremarkable" party for others so it would make sense that her friend might not remember it. "Dr. Ford of course will never forget this gathering because of what happened to her there."</p><p>The committee's investigation has been in the backdrop of a  week filled with contentious negotiations between Ford, her attorneys and the committee leadership over whether she would testify. </p><p>On Saturday, a tentative agreement was made for Ford to appear before Congress on Thursday. Other details over her appearance haven't been outlined and the back-and-forth was sure to continue on Sunday and into next week. </p><p>Some of those details included whether Ford would testify to the committee before or after Kavanaugh; whether the committee would subpoena a possible witness to the alleged assault, Kavanaugh's boyhood friend Mark Judge; and who would conduct the questioning. </p><p>Republicans had floated the idea of having a female committee staffer question Ford, to avoid the optics of the panel's all-male Republican roster interrogating Ford. </p><p>It's unclear whether Saturday's discussions between Ford and committee leadership resolved any of the details. </p>

    1 September 23, 2018
  •  Maldives election begins amid opposition cry of unfairness

    Maldives election begins amid opposition cry of unfairness

    ital, Male, about 40 minutes after polls opened. Huge crowds flocked to closely guarded polling stations.</p><p> Gayoom has been criticized for cracking down on freedoms. He used his first term to consolidate power, jailing opponents, including his half brother, a former president, and two Supreme Court Justices, or forcing them into exile and asserting control over the courts.</p><p> Police raided the opposition presidential candidate's main campaign office on Saturday evening, citing a warrant to search for evidence of vote-buying.</p><p> Members of the opposition decried the raid, saying the election could be rigged in favor of Gayoom.</p>

    1 September 23, 2018

Comments

Earn free bitcoin