Dutch appeals court upholds landmark climate case ruling

A Dutch appeals court has upheld a landmark ruling that ordered the Dutch government to cut the country's greenhouse gas emissions by at least 25 percent by 2020 from benchmark 1990 levels.

The original June 2015 ruling came in a case brought by the environmental group Urgenda on behalf of 900 Dutch citizens. Similar cases are now underway in several countries around the world.

Since the original judgment, a new Dutch government has pledged to reduce emissions by 49 percent by 2030.

 

October 09, 2018

Sources: ABC News

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    1 October 16, 2018

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