EVERY schoolchild in Britain will get routine mental health checks

Mrs May has announced further provisions to safeguard the mental health of youngsters 

Primary and secondary schools will carry out ‘wellbeing’ assessments to spot potential issues. 

Mental health problems among the young have increased six-fold over the past two decades and one in ten children now has a diagnosable condition.

Girls are most at risk, with self-harming reported among a fifth of those aged 14.

Mrs May said half of all mental health problems arise by the age of 14 yet only one in three get the right treatment. 

The new checks are part of a £1.9billion plan to transform mental health services in schools.

Mrs May said: ‘We can end the stigma that has forced too many to suffer in silence. We can prevent the tragedy of suicide taking too many lives.

‘And we can give the mental wellbeing of our children the priority it so profoundly deserves.’

The new mental health assessments are to be made available to all schools as part of new classes on ‘mental resilience’ which will be part of the curriculum from 2020.

Downing Street stressed that although the classes will be mandatory, it will be up to each school whether they use the assessments.

But all teachers will be ‘encouraged’ to use the tests in order to highlight any issues so they can better target their teaching.

Officials envisage that most pupils will be assessed every year from the age of four.

They expect the assessments to be in a similar form to the ‘wellbeing’ surveys currently used by the Office of National Statistics to gauge the nation’s mood, adjusted for the age of the child.

Those surveys ask people how happy they are out of 10, how they rate their ‘satisfaction with life’, and how ‘worthwhile’ they believe their daily activities are.

If issues with particular children arise as a result of the assessments, it will be up to each teacher whether they flag it with parents, officials said.

The assessments are new element of a £1.9billion plan to transform mental health services in schools, outlined in a green paper published by the Government earlier this year.

Ministers expect the overall plan to bring savings of £6.4billion by spotting mental illness much earlier in life.

Health experts last night welcomed the announcement as a crucial step for the one in ten under-16s suffer from a mental health condition.

But they pointed out there is a huge way to go until mental health is given the same priority as physical health.

A report by the National Audit Office yesterday said the Government is ‘further away than it thought’ from achieving its goal of equal access to physical and mental health services for young people.

The Government aims 70,000 additional children and young people will receive treatment every year by 2020/21.

But the NAO said even if Ministers deliver on their plans they are unlikely to hit the target.

A separate report published in the Lancet medical journal last night found mental health disorders will drain £12 trillion per year from the global economy by 2030.

Mrs May said: ‘There are few greater examples than the injustices facing those with mental health conditions. But together we can change that.

‘Our record investment in the NHS will mean record investment in mental health.

‘We are not looking after our health if we are not looking after our mental health.

‘So we need true parity between physical and mental health - and not just in our health systems - but in our classrooms, workplaces and communities too.’

Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who yesterday hosted a mental health summit in London, attended by ministers from 50 countries and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, said: ‘We need to do more to challenge the stigma that people with mental ill-health face and make sure they feel they can reach out for help.’

Dr Marc Bush, policy director at the YoungMinds charity, said: ‘While there are still big questions to be answered on future funding for NHS children’s mental health services, it’s good news that the government is committing to further support for schools.

‘The wellbeing of children should be every bit as important as academic performance, and schools need the tools and resources to make this a priority.

‘Mental health support teams could make a real difference, though the programme needs to be expanded so that it reaches all schools and students.

‘New state of the nation reports and student wellbeing measures will help to provide robust evidence about which mental health initiatives are most effective. Only by having up-to-date insights about the experience of young people can we hope to address the current crisis.’

A spokesman for the NSPCC added: ‘Increasing mental health support and awareness in schools is an important step to ensure children who need help get it as soon as possible.

‘But we know children don’t just experience mental health problems during the school day, with two thirds of contacts to Childline about mental health issues coming outside school hours.

‘Early intervention is vital to support young people before they reach this sort of crisis point.’

Theresa May has appointed the world’s first Minister for Suicide Prevention in a bid to cut the number of people taking their own lives.

Health Minister Jackie Doyle-Price will lead the national effort and try to end the stigma which stops people from seeking help, the Prime Minister said.

Around 4,500 people take their lives every year in England and suicide remains the leading cause of death among men under the age of 45.

Jackie Doyle-Price has been announced as the Minister for Suicide Prevention 

Mrs Doyle-Price, whose title is now Minister for Mental Health, Inequalities and Suicide Prevention, said: ‘I understand how tragic, devastating and long-lasting the effect of suicide can be on families and communities.

‘In my time as health minister I have met many people who have been bereaved by suicide and their stories of pain and loss will stay with me for a long time.

‘It’s these people who need to be at the heart of what we do and I welcome this opportunity to work closely with them, as well as experts, to oversee a cross-Government suicide prevention plan, making their sure their views are always heard.’ 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: ‘We’re already making progress when it comes to suicide prevention, the suicide rate is at its lowest for seven years.

‘But we need to do more to challenge the stigma that people with mental ill-health face and make sure they feel they can reach out for help.

‘I am delighted we are appointing Jackie Doyle-Price as our dedicated Minister for Suicide Prevention, and I know she will make a real difference.

‘Every suicide is a preventable death and we are determined to do everything we can to tackle the tragedy of suicide.’

Mrs Doyle-Price, 49, was elected MP for Thurrock in Essex in 2010 and given her first government job following the 2017 election, as junior health minister.

Originally from Sheffield, she sparked a row last year when she said many elderly people are ‘sitting in homes that really are too big for their needs’ - and should not expect to pass them on to their children.

She had one of the smallest majorities in Parliament - just 92 votes - when elected in 2010, but has since increased the margin to 351.

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October 10, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

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They help to coat the digestive tract, providing a protective layer, hence reducing irritation,' Ms Anhelush said.  </p><p>Yeast and gluten-based alcohols such as beer and cider can be strenuous on the digestive system, as well as the sulphites in red wine, Ms Anhelush said </p><p>Alcohol that is high in sugars such as cocktails and flavoured wines, may aggravate or cause indigestion, Ms Anhelush said.</p><p>'Yeast and gluten-based alcohols such as beer and cider as well as alcohol high in sulphites such as red wine can also be strenuous on the digestive system and our detoxification pathways.'</p><p>Ms Anhelush said: 'Keep hydrated if you do drink alcohol and arm yourself with a nutrient dense meal beforehand full of dark green leafy vegetables and high-quality protein such as organic chicken or wild fish.'</p><p>You could also trying gently detoxing your body throughout the Christmas period. 'This can reduce your chances of weight gain and feeling generally fatigued and run down,' Ms Anhelush said. </p><p>'Green vegetables and fruits really are your friend at this time as they are packed full of nutrients and support the detoxification process of rich food and alcohol from your body.'</p><p>Smoothies made with kale, spinach, broccoli, and apples can be a great way to ensure your body is getting the nutrients it needs.</p><p>Ms Anhelush said: 'As it is winter time, you can also put green vegetables into a soup for lunch or dinner, adding in herbs such as coriander, which is highly detoxifying and full of plant chemicals.'</p><p>It's also worth nothing that studies have found that medicines often taken for indigestion may have an adverse effect on blood alcohol levels when you're taking them with alcohol, so talk to your doctor if you're on them. </p><p>In the study by the university of Birmingham and Loughborough, participants in the group who were asked to weight themselves twice a week were given a list of roughly how much physical activity would be needed to burn off approximate calories found in popular food and drinks consumed at Christmas.</p><p>1. Try to eat roughly the same time each day, whether this is two or five times a day.  </p><p>2.  Chose reduced fat foods (e.g. dairy foods, spreads, salad dressings) where you can. Use high fat food sparingly (e.g. butter and oils) if at all.</p><p>3. Walk 10,000 steps each day (equivalent to 60-90 minutes moderate activity). </p><p>4.  If you snack, choose a healthy option such as fresh fruit or low calorie yogurts instead of chocolate or crisps.</p><p>5. Be careful about food claims on labels. Check the fat and sugar on labels when shopping and preparing food. </p><p>6. Do not heap food on your plate, except vegetables. Think twice before having second helpings.</p><p>7. Break up your sitting time. Stand up for ten minutes of every hour.</p><p>8. Think about your drinks. Choose water or sugar free squashes. Unsweetened fruit juice contains natural sugar so limit to one glass a day (200ml). Alcohol is high in calories so limit to one unit per day for women and two for men. Try diluting drinks with water, soda or low calorie mixers.</p><p>9. Slow down. Do not eat on the go or while watching TV. Eat at a table if possible. </p><p>10. Eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day (400g in total). </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 11, 2018
  • 
	Coffee could combat Parkinson's and dementia

    Coffee could combat Parkinson's and dementia

    f dementia, research suggests.</p><p>Two compounds, including caffeine, in the pick-me-up work together to prevent the accumulation of a toxic protein in the brains of mice. </p><p>This protein, known as alpha-synuclein, is associated with both Parkinson's and dementia with lewy bodies (DLB). </p><p>Tests on rodents genetically at risk of both diseases showed the combination of caffeine and the compound EHT prevented alpha-synuclein from building-up after just six months. </p><p>The scientists now hope caffeine and EHT could be combined into a drug to help treat Parkinson's and DLB in humans, which are both incurable.</p><p>Coffee could combat Parkinson's disease and a form of dementia, research suggests (stock)</p><p>The research was carried out by Rutgers University and led by neurologist Dr M Maral Mouradian.</p><p>Nearly one million Americans are expected to be diagnosed with Parkinson's by 2020, according to figures. Around 145,500 have been diagnosed in the UK.</p><p>PD is a neurodegenerative disorder that mainly affects the dopamine-producing brain networks in the substantia nigra. </p><p>Symptoms include shaking, stiffness, and difficulty walking, balancing and coordinating. </p><p>Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) is a type of dementia that shares symptoms with both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. It occurs when alpha-synuclein appears in nerve cells in the brain.</p><p>Alpha-synuclein's function in a healthy brain is unclear. When it clumps, it can lead to cell death, which is associated with both PD and DLB. </p><p>Treatments for both diseases focus on reducing the protein's gene expression and blocking its aggregation. </p><p>DLB affects around 1.3million in the US, according to the Lewy Body Dementia Association. And it makes up between 10 and 15 per cent of all 850,000 dementia cases in the UK, Alzheimer's Society states. </p><p>Parkinson’s disease affects one in 500 people, and around 127,000 people in the UK live with the condition.</p><p>Figures also suggest one million Americans also suffer.</p><p>It causes muscle stiffness, slowness of movement, tremors, sleep disturbance, chronic fatigue, an impaired quality of life and can lead to severe disability.</p><p>It is a progressive neurological condition that destroys cells in the part of the brain that controls movement.</p><p>Sufferers are known to have diminished supplies of dopamine because nerve cells that make it have died.</p><p>There is currently no cure and no way of stopping the progression of the disease, but hundreds of scientific trials are underway to try and change that.  </p><p>The disease claimed the life of boxing legend Muhammad Ali in 2016.</p><p>The researchers analysed newborn mice who expressed a gene that caused alpha-synuclein to aggregate in their brain. </p><p>The rodents were given either 50mg/kg of caffeine, 12mg/kg of EHT or a combination of the two mixed in their food or water every day for six months. </p><p>Tests were then carried out to assess the animals' motor, learning and memory skills, which reflects activity in different parts of the brain.</p><p>When given alone, neither caffeine nor EHT had any effect. But the mice who took the two compounds together had higher test scores.</p><p>The rodents were then euthanised and their brains examined. This revealed EHT and caffeine together boosted the activity of the protein PP2A, which prevented the accumulation of alpha-synuclein clumps.</p><p>The compound coupling also led to reduced brain inflammation, which is a hallmark of PD. </p><p>The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.</p><p>EHT is found in a coffee bean's waxy coating and is unrelated to caffeine. A derivative of the 'happy hormone' serotonin, it has been found to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in past studies.</p><p>Dr Mouradian stressed further studies are required to determine the correct ratios of caffeine and EHT to help protect people from PD and DLB. </p><p>'EHT is a compound found in various types of coffee but the amount varies,' she said. </p><p>'It is important that the appropriate amount and ratio be determined so people don't over-caffeinate themselves, as that can have negative health consequences.' </p><p>Caffeine has previously been found to preserve brain health, with the role of coffee's thousands of other compounds being less clear until now.  </p><p>Lewy body dementia (LBD) is the second most common form of degenerative dementia after Alzheimer's.</p><p>It is the form Robin Williams was diagnosed with before he took his own life in 2014.</p><p>Unlike Alzheimer's, LBD affects the brain regions responsible for vision - as opposed to memory.</p><p>That means sufferers may start with memory loss, but over time the more debilitating symptoms will be powerful hallucinations, nightmares and spatial-awareness problems.</p><p>LBD is closely connected to Parkinson's disease, meaning that many sufferers will develop Parkinson's as well - as happened to Robin Williams.</p><p>Many sufferers will first develop Parkinson's, suffering physical disabilities, before doctors diagnose their dementia. That is what happened to the late revered actor Robin Williams.</p><p>Some will start with memory loss that could be mistaken for the more common Alzheimer's disease. Over time, they will develop symptoms more clearly associated with LBD.</p><p>There is no known cause. What we do know is that risk increases with age.</p><p>At a cellular level, LBD is characterized by tiny clumps of abnormal proteins produced by the brain when its cells are not working properly.</p><p>They cause memory problems, although these don’t tend to be as severe as with Alzheimer’s — which is linked to a build-up of the protein beta-amyloid.</p><p>Another key difference is that Lewy body dementia affects regions of the brain responsible for vision, causing powerful hallucinations, nightmares and spatial-awareness problems.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 11, 2018
  • 
	Why red meat paves the way to heart disease

    Why red meat paves the way to heart disease

    new research.</p><p>Regular consumption of red meat can raise levels of a cardiovascular disease causing chemical more than 10 times, suggests the study.</p><p>The organic compound - known as TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) - is produced in the gut during digestion.</p><p>High levels have been associated with increasing the risk of strokes, heart attacks and premature death.</p><p>Now the first study of its kind has shown they rose an average threefold among participants put on a red meat diet - in only a month.</p><p>Red meat elevates levels of TMAO which has been linked to the development of hardening of the arteries - or atherosclerosis - and heart disease complications</p><p>In some cases they soared ten-fold compared to those eating chicken or vegetarian based meals.</p><p>Dr Stanley Hazen, director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Microbiome and Human Health, said: 'This is the first study of our knowledge to show the kidneys can change how effectively they expel different compounds depending on the diet that one eats - other than salts and water.</p><p>'We know lifestyle factors are critical for cardiovascular health and these findings build upon our previous research on TMAO's link with heart disease.</p><p>'They provide further evidence for how dietary interventions may be an effective treatment strategy to reduce TMAO levels and lower subsequent risk of heart disease.'</p><p>It's produced when gut bacteria digest choline, lecithin and carnitine - nutrients abundant in animal products such as red meat and liver.</p><p>The study, published in the European Heart Journal, was based on blood and urine samples taken from 113 people.</p><p>They were provided with the three different meal plans in random order where red meat, white meat or vegetables provided 25 percent of their protein intake.</p><p>After they stopped the red meat diet, TMAO levels subsided over the following month.</p><p>The US team was surprised to discover the choice of diets changed the effectiveness of the kidneys to expel compounds.</p><p>Dr Hazen said red meat elevates levels of TMAO which has been linked to the development of hardening of the arteries - or atherosclerosis - and heart disease complications.</p><p>His earlier work has led to TMAO testing now being in clinical use around the world to measure cardiovascular disease risk.</p><p>Meanwhile another study by the same team, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, showed cardiovascular disease could be prevented by targeting a gut microbial pathway that converts carnitine into TMAO.</p><p>Carnitine - also used in energy drinks and supplements - can induce TMAO production even for vegans and vegetarians who continue eating their normal diets.</p><p>It follows the design of a potential new class of drugs earlier this year for prevention of heart disease and clotting by interrupting the microbial pathway by which choline is converted into TMAO.</p><p>Dr Hazen and colleagues compared the impact of daily carnitine pills on meat eaters with vegetarians.</p><p>The latter showed limited ability to produce TMAO from carnitine while the former did so rapidly.</p><p>After one month of supplementation, both groups showed an increased capacity to produce TMAO.</p><p>Dr Hazen said: 'It is remarkable that vegans and vegetarians can barely make TMAO from dietary carnitine.</p><p>'The striking new finding about the pathway induced by ingesting carnitine - even if only provided as a supplement in a capsule form - provides important insights about new interventions to inhibit TMAO, which may help reduce risks for cardiovascular disease,</p><p>'By uncovering this new pathway, we can potentially develop new treatments to interrupt this process before both the development and progression of cardiovascular disease.'</p><p>Heart disease is the biggest killer in every country in the world.</p><p>Red meat – such as beef, lamb and pork – is a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals, and can form part of a balanced diet.</p><p>But eating a lot of red and processed meat probably increases your risk of bowel cancer.</p><p>It's recommended people who eat more than 90g (cooked weight) of red and processed meat - which includes bacon and sausages - per day cut down to 70g.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 11, 2018
  • 
	Crosswords do NOT prevent dementia but can make your brain sharper to start off with

    Crosswords do NOT prevent dementia but can make your brain sharper to start off with

    oes not slow mental decline in old age, researchers have found.</p><p>But the activities do boost mental ability, so when the brain does start deteriorating there is a 'higher cognitive point' from which to decline.</p><p>Experts have long believed in the neurological theory of 'use it or lose it' - which suggests people who have complex jobs or do intellectual puzzles that tax the brain are protected against mental decline.</p><p>Puzzles such as crosswords or Sudoku do not slow the rate of cognitive decline, but create a 'higher cognitive point' from which decline can start from, a study found</p><p>They believed that exercising the brain throughout a lifetime slows the speed at which the brain deteriorates in old age.</p><p>Now, however, scientists from the University of Aberdeen have found this is not quite the case.</p><p>The team recruited 498 people at the age of 64 and tracked them for the next 15 years, monitoring their mental abilities throughout the period.</p><p>They found those who had engaged in intellectually stimulating activities on a regular basis had higher mental ability at the start of the study - but there was no difference in the speed at which they declined over the next 15 years.</p><p>The scientists, writing in the British Medical Journal, said: 'These results indicate that engagement in problem solving does not protect an individual from decline, but imparts a higher starting point from which decline is observed and offsets the point at which impairment becomes significant.'</p><p>The team said this supports the theory of 'cognitive reserve' - the ability that some people have to maintain their memory and IQ despite the impact of ageing.</p><p>This is because regularly using the brain for complex tasks creates a greater number of connections between brain cells.</p><p>So when the wiring of the brain starts the break down with age, or if dementia starts to attack, the brain has 'backup' networks to use instead.</p><p>The scientists wrote: 'This association suggests that engagement adds to an individual's cognitive reserve - that is, individuals who engage in regular problem solving activities might require greater age related neuropathological burdens before clinical thresholds of impairment are crossed and symptoms of cognitive decline are reported.' </p><p>Scientists have unveiled diet and lifestyle tips that maintain brain health in old age. </p><p>According to researchers from around the world 'what's good for the heart is good for the brain'.</p><p>They add that no single food acts as a 'silver bullet' for improving or maintaining brain health.</p><p>The experts have put together the following diet and lifestyle advice to help people preserve their brain health as they age.</p><p>Eating plenty of berries helps maintain people's brain health as they get older</p><p>Eleven researchers from the Global Council on Brain Health, including experts from the University of Exeter, met on September 12-to-13 2017 to discuss the impact of diet on the brain health of adults over 50. </p><p>Their recommendations are based on the evaluation of studies investigating the impact of nutrients on the cognitive function of older adults. </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 11, 2018
  • 
	Marijuana eased Alzheimer's symptoms for dying Holocaust survivor, his family says

    Marijuana eased Alzheimer's symptoms for dying Holocaust survivor, his family says

    lled the haunting flashbacks and anxiety of a Holocaust survivor who developed Alzheimer's, his family claims.  </p><p>Alexander Spier spent three years in concentration camps, including Auschwitz-Birkenau and Bergen-Belsen, before he was freed in the liberation of 1945.</p><p>As soon as he was freed he reclaimed his life, emigrating to the US that same year, where he met his wife Sonja, they had a son and a daughter, and he worked hard, first as a jeweler and watchmaker, then heading up his own real estate business. </p><p>Tragically, in 2010, he was diagnosed with the age-related brain disease that consumed him for seven years until he passed away.</p><p>His relatives recall the trauma of watching him relive his war-era memories, shouting in Dutch and German: 'Where is my mother?' </p><p>But according to his son, Greg Spier, they managed to offer him one small piece of respite in the form of granola bars laced with cannabis, which they say eased his agitation and allowed him to sleep.   </p><p>Spier passed away in 2017, and now the Spier Family Foundation is partnering with Harvard's McLean Psychiatric Hospital and paying for marijuana research in hopes of shedding fresh light on Alzheimer's and potentially offering better treatments.   </p><p>Alexander Spier, of Foxborough, Massachusetts, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease almost 10 years ago. No long-term care or antipsychotic drugs helped his symptoms of disorientation and changes in mood and behavior. Pictured, Spier, right, with his son Greg</p><p>His family says his agitation subsided and he was able to sleep when he would eat granola bars laced with cannabis. Pictured, left to right: Spier's son Greg, his wife Sonja, Spier, and his daughter-in-law Kathryn in 2013</p><p>Spier grew up in Amsterdam, Holland, and was a member of the Dutch resistance during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands during World War II.</p><p>He was just 15 years old when he was captured in 1941 by Nazi troops.</p><p>Spier was tattooed with the identification number 164023 and spent the next three years in three different concentration camps before he was freed during the 1945 liberation. </p><p>He emigrated to the US at the end of World War II where he worked as a watchmaker and jeweler before starting a real estate company.</p><p>He met his wife Sonja in 1951 and they married after just 82 days of knowing each other. The couple moved to Foxborugh, Massachusetts, where they raised a son and a daughter.</p><p>Around 2010, Spier was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. </p><p>An estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer's disease in 2018.</p><p>Sufferers experience a decline in cognitive, behavioral and physical abilities and there is no cure.</p><p>According to Spier's son, Greg, his fathers declined rapidly in health for the final two years of his life. </p><p>'My father spoke five languages, and he was speaking Dutch and German, reliving the three concentration camps he survived.'</p><p>Greg says during those final two years, Spier would often plead in German: 'Where is my mother?'</p><p>About 50 percent of Alzheimer's patients develop what are known as neuropsychiatric symptoms, which include agitation, aggression and disorientation.</p><p>As his symptoms worsened, Spier was moved into a memory program in Florida, which is a form of long-term care that is designed to meet the specific needs of a person with Alzheimer's disease or dementia.</p><p>Doctors tried to treat him with antipsychotic and anti-seizure medications, but they only worsened his symptoms.</p><p>Greg told ABC News that he and a niece that lives in Colorado were the family members who decided to try marijuana edibles as a final resort.</p><p>Greg or the private assistant living with Spier would feed him cannabis granola bars up to four times a day during the final months of his life. </p><p>'The only thing that seemed to give him any reprieve was the marijuana,' Greg told ABC, saying the bars also helped his father sleep. </p><p>Spier died in September 2017 from Alzheimer's complications, and now the Spier Family Foundation is pushing for research on potential benefits of marijuana in Alzheimer's and dementia patients.</p><p>There has not been a great deal of research done on the effects of cannabis in Alzheimer's patients, but a few studies have showed promising findings.</p><p>THC is the psychoactive compound responsible for the euphoric, 'high' feeling often associated with marijuana.</p><p>Compared to the mice not treated with THC, mice that were treated had fewer lost brain cells, performed better on memory tests, and had 20 percent less of the plaques in the brain that are believed to cause cognitive decline. </p><p>Some studies conducted on mice showed that when the rodents were treated with THC, they performed better on memory tests and had fewer plaques in the brain that are believed to cause cognitive decline. Pictured: Spier in 2014</p><p>The Spier Family Foundation is partnering with Harvard's McLean Psychiatric Hospital and paying for marijuana research in hopes of shedding fresh light on Alzheimer's and potentially offering better treatments. Pictured: Spier in 2017</p><p>While several studies have linked cannabis use to long-term damage in teenage brains, Dr Brent Forester, chief of the division of geriatric psychiatry at McLean Hospital in Boston, said the same effects may not be true for people who begin in old age.</p><p>When they tested the mice in learning capacity and memory, results were just as good as those of two-month old mice. </p><p>Dr Forester and his team have partnered with the Spier family to conduct research on cannabis treatments in Alzheimer's patients. </p><p>They previously published a study in 2014 where they gave the synthetic THC drug dronabinol to patients diagnosed with dementia.</p><p>Results showed that the patients' agitation and sleep duration were improved, and they're now recruiting for a larger trial that will be funded by the National Institute on Aging.  </p><p>'We really need to open up opportunities to study medical marijuana for this particular indication,' Dr Forester told ABC News.</p><p>'I think there's enough evidence from the synthetic THC as well as anecdotal reports that it's certainly worth studying.' </p><p>Last week, Minnesota joined 12 states and Washington, DC that allow residents to be prescribed medical marijuana either for Alzheimer’s or related symptoms.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 11, 2018
  • 
	SECRETS OF AN A-LIST BODY: How to get arms like Hollywood star Lupita Nyong’o

    SECRETS OF AN A-LIST BODY: How to get arms like Hollywood star Lupita Nyong’o

    cently revealed enviably toned arms on the red carpet. </p><p>However, her impressive figure is no accident - in fact, the 35-year-old actress puts in serious training for her roles.  </p><p>Looking good! Lupita Nyong’o recently revealed enviably toned arms on the red carpet</p><p>On preparing for Black Panther, she said: ‘We had six weeks of boot camp before filming. It started off with four hours a day, which was exhausting.’</p><p>So how can you replicate her look? Here, we reveal the best exercises to get her sculpted arms.   </p><p>- A raised push-up is good for arms. Position your hands on the floor over shoulder-width apart and in line with your chest. </p><p>- Raise your feet behind you onto a step or sofa. Engage stomach muscles. Bend arms to lower yourself towards the floor — your nose should almost touch the ground.</p><p>- Straighten the elbows and raise yourself back to the start position. </p><p>- Repeat to exhaustion and rest for 45 seconds. Perform four sets.</p><p>Treading the red carpet: The acclaimed 35-year-old star puts in serious training for her roles</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 11, 2018

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