British spy Christopher Steele breaks silence, issues a veiled swipe at Trump

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DOJ official Bruce Ohr reportedly communicated with Trump dossier author Christopher Steele after the FBI cut ties; reaction and analysis on 'The Ingraham Angle.'

Former British spy Christopher Steele, author of the salacious Trump dossier, has broken 18 months of silence with a swipe at President Trump.

“I salute those on your list, and otherwise, who have had the courage to speak out over the last year, often at great personal cost,” he continued. “At a time when governance is so distorted and one-sided, as I believe it currently is in the United States, the media has a key role to play in holding it accountable.”

"In these strange and troubling times, it is hard to speak unpalatable truths to power, but I believe we all still have a duty to do so. ...  At a time when governance is so distorted and one-sided, as I believe it currently is in the United States, the media has a key role to play in holding it accountable."

Steele rose to controversial prominence after he was revealed to be the author of the unverified dossier about Trump and his dealings with Russia, which was funded by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and the Hillary Clinton campaign.

The Department of Justice released documents earlier this summer that were used by the government to justify the FISA surveillance warrant against Carter Page, a former campaign adviser to then-candidate Trump.

The documents show that the infamous and unverified Steele dossier was a major component of the 2016 surveillance warrant. The dossier was also a major component to justify subsequent renewals of the surveillance warrant.

The unredacted sections of the FISA documents don’t indicate the dossier’s content was ever verified. The FBI said Steele was “reliable” based on his previous work.

After Steele was "suspended and then terminated" as an FBI source -- for what the bureau described as "unauthorized disclosure to the media of his relationship with the FBI" -- he reportedly remained in contact with Bruce Ohr, a U.S. Justice Department official whose wife, Nellie Ohr, worked for Fusion GPS, the research firm that hired Steele to compile information for the dossier.

“The former head of M.I.6’s Russia desk compiled the infamous dossier that raised the possibility Donald Trump was vulnerable to Russian blackmail,” the magazine wrote. “Steele even grew a beard and went into hiding — merely adding to his mythic reputation on the left.”

Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who’s investigating the Trump campaign’s alleged collusion with the Russian government, topped the list and was branded the most influential figure in 2018.

The U.S. president didn’t make the list, but Russian President Vladimir Putin was given 58th place, just below singer Rihanna and above Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey.

"In more normal times, I would have welcomed the opportunity to join you at your New Establishment Summit in the US this week. Sadly, in the present legal and political situation I am unable to do so, but I sincerely hope and trust that these circumstances will change soon.”

“I was surprised and honoured, particularly as a Brit, to be included” in the list, Steele wrote in an email. “I find myself in the company of many talented and distinguished people, although I personally would not accord such accolades to some of the other foreign nationals included in the list!” he continued, likely referring to Putin’s presence on the list.

“In more normal times, I would have welcomed the opportunity to join you at your New Establishment Summit in the US this week,” he added. “Sadly, in the present legal and political situation I am unable to do so, but I sincerely hope and trust that these circumstances will change soon.”

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October 10, 2018

Sources: Fox News

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  • Eric Garcetti's speech cut short after being heckled by protesters at USC: report

    Eric Garcetti's speech cut short after being heckled by protesters at USC: report

    ritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes. </p><p>Garcetti was scheduled to deliver the keynote speech at an event to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but after about a minute into the speech, protesters railed against his handling of homelessness and Los Angeles Police Department&apos;s use of force, the report said.</p><p>The Los Angeles Community Action Network and the Los Angeles chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America organized the demonstration, the paper reported.</p><p>Steve Diaz, an organizer with Los Angeles Community Action Network, told The Times that&#xA0;his group wants housing for the homeless to be built faster, and for the city to stop the police sweeps of homeless camps.</p><p>One demonstrator stood&#xA0;up and accused the city of trashing the belongings of the homeless during tent sweeps, the paper reported. Another protester shouted that Los Angeles is a city &quot;where real estate interests displace entire communities of color,&quot; according to The Times.</p><p>Some USC students showed support for Garcetti, clapping for him when he tried to respond to the demonstrators,&#xA0;the report said. They also gave him a standing ovation as he exited the stage.</p><p>The mayor reportedly left the stage after nearly 20 minutes, as an event organizer thanked him.</p><p>Alex Comisar, spokesman for Garcetti, told the paper that&#xA0;the event was &#x201C;unfortunate&#x201D; that a &#x201C;very small group of people denied the audience an opportunity to hear [Garcetti&#x2019;s] remarks &#x2014; but he respects the 1st Amendment rights of all people who want to make their voices heard on issues that they care deeply about.&#x201D;</p><p>The event&apos;s audience had about 350 people at USC&apos;s Bovard Auditorium, the report said.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 December 11, 2018
  • Beto O'Rouke speaks with Rev Al Sharpton amid 2020 speculation: report

    Beto O'Rouke speaks with Rev Al Sharpton amid 2020 speculation: report

    ritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes. </p><p>&quot;They spoke and agreed to meet within the next couple of weeks and they had a great conversation,&#x201D; Rachel Noerdlinger, a spokeswoman for Sharpton told the news outlet.</p><p>O&apos;Rouke, 46, initially said earlier he had no intention for running for the office, but in a town hall late last month, he said was not ruling anything out. He said he was focused on the Senate race against incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz, but is now considering other options since his 2.6-point loss in the November midterms.</p><p>Sharpton&#xA0;wields political influence, hosting the annual National Action Network conference in New York that had drawn major Democratic presidential candidates, including former President Obama, the report said.</p><p>Sharpton&apos;s spokeswoman did not discuss what the two talked about during the call.</p><p>O&apos;Rouke&apos;s overture to Sharpton is a sign that he is courting Obama allies, according to the publication.</p><p>Earlier in November, Obama said that O&apos;Rourke reminded him of himself, the report said.</p><p>&#x201C;What I liked most about his race was that it didn&#x2019;t feel constantly poll-tested,&#x201D; Obama had said of O&apos;Rouke. &#x201C;It felt as if he based his statements and his positions on what he believed. And that, you&#x2019;d like to think, is normally how things work. Sadly it&#x2019;s not.&#x201D;</p><p>O&apos;Rourke said last month that he prefers to finish his congressional term Jan. 3 before deciding what&apos;s next.</p><p>His national profile has&#xA0;strengthened&#xA0;after raising more than $60 million for his Senate campaign &#x2014; much of it from small donations &#x2014; and coming close to unseating Cruz.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 December 11, 2018

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