‘I’m so excited I’ll run down the aisle’: Eugenie reveals it was ‘love at first sight’

Princess Eugenie has revealed she is so excited to be marrying the love of her life today that she will be 'running down the aisle'.

In an interview on the eve of the royal wedding, the Queen's granddaughter said she was nervous but couldn't wait to exchange vows with drinks industry executive Jack Brooksbank, 32, because 'it was love at first sight'. 

Her grandfather, Prince Philip, is coming out of his retirement from public life for the event, despite having an enduringly frosty relationship with his former daughter-in-law, the duchess.

Look of love: The Queen's granddaughter Princess Eugenie, pictured with her fiancé Jack Brooksbank, said she was nervous but couldn't wait to exchange vows with the 32-year-old drinks industry executive because 'it was love at first sight'

The princess will arrive with her father in the same Rolls Royce 1950 Phantom IV that was lent to the now-Duchess of Sussex on her wedding day by the Queen.

It was made for the monarch when she was still a princess and the first Rolls Royce that she and Prince Philip had, a sign of how special the vehicle is.

In an interview with presenters Eamon Holmes and Ruth Langsford, who will be anchoring live coverage of the wedding on ITV's This Morning from 9.25am today, Eugenie and her fiancé described the moment they first saw each other on ski holiday in Verbier, Switzerland.

Mr Brooksbank said: 'We were skiing in a friend's place out in Switzerland, and [looking at Eugenie] I saw you first, didn't I? And we just stared at each other.'

Eugenie continued: 'Yes, and I thought, 'what a silly hat!'... and I thought, 'who's that?' and then you came over and shook my hand and I was all butterflies and nervous.

'I think I rang my mum that night and said, 'I've met this guy Jack'... and that was it I think about how it started.

'I remember being like, 'I really, really like this guy, I really want him to like me too,' and then you gave me this huge windscreen wiper wave and that was it, right, he likes me.'

Jack described his bride-to-be as a 'bright shining light ',while Eugenie said: 'Jack's the kind of guy, you know when you're lost at a party and you can't find anyone to talk to, and you start panicking and you need help?

Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank, pictured during the ITV interview, will marry at St George's Chapel in Windsor tomorrow where Harry and Meghan also exchanged vows. They first met on ski holiday in Verbier, Switzerland

'He'll walk in and make everyone feel so special. He'll scoop you up and talk to you and make you feel a million dollars and that's you, and you're so humble and generous.'

The couple both said they immediately knew they wanted their siblings to be best man and maid of honour - Jack's brother, Tom, for him and Princess Beatrice for her.

Eugenie said: 'She's my big sissy - I've looked up to her my whole life. I've wanted to be her at times, we've fought over Converse trainers and who gets what... and you know, we're best friends and I can't think of anyone I'd want by my side more than her.

'She's the biggest supporter of 'Team Eug and Jack' and so it's a great honour for me that she said 'yes' and she's doing that duty.'

Eugenie said the whole experience of such a big wedding - they will have 800 guests and the event will be televised - was 'nerve-wracking and a bit scary'.

But she added: 'But at the end of the day you get to marry the person you love.... and you're going to be at the end of the aisle, and I'm going to be running towards you!'

Jack said Eugenie, who works for a leading London art gallery, was far from a 'bridezilla', despite the lavish nature of the occasion.

'Eugenie has been amazing. She's been incredible, she has the ability to do a million things at once in her brain, including working as well as organising everything to do with the wedding,' he said.

The couple were at Windsor yesterday, along with the whole bridal party, including George and Charlotte, for a wedding rehearsal in the chapel, which has been decorated with flowers, including the white rose of Yorkshire, appropriately for the Yorks.

Some of the young choristers who will sing at the wedding performed at Harry and Meghan's nuptials earlier in the year.

In an interview with presenters Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford (left), who will be anchoring live coverage of the wedding on ITV's This Morning from 9.25am today, Eugenie and her fiancé described the moment they first saw each other 

It is the first time in living memory two royal weddings have been staged in the same year at Windsor Castle's St George's Chapel, so the choristers will be part of an historic double.

Alexios Sheppard, 11, said: 'It's one of the best experiences we're ever going to have - it's just amazing. They call it a once-in-a-lifetime experience, but not for us.'

David Conner, the Dean of Windsor, will officiate and has also been giving the pair the traditional pre-marital guidance counselling.

He said: 'They just come across as just the perfect couple. They are very natural with each other, they obviously love one another but they also have a lot of fun together and it's been a real pleasure to work with them.

'You just have to remember it's their day and really do your very best to focus on them and not on the hundreds of famous and semi-famous people who will be around.'

He said the princess regarded St George's Chapel as her 'parish church' even though it was a 'bit grand'.

Buckingham Palace has said it will not announce the designer of Eugenie's dress until she arrives.

But in a previous interview the princess said: '(The dress) is the one thing that I was really decisive about. As soon as we announced the wedding, I knew the designer, and the look, straight away. I never thought I'd be the one who knew exactly what I like, but I've been pretty on top of it.' 

Eugenie, pictured with her fiancé and ITV's Eamon Holmes and Ruth Langsford, said the whole experience of such a big wedding - they will have 800 guests and the event will be televised - was 'nerve-wracking and a bit scary'

0700 - Doors open to the invited public through the Visitor Admission Centre on Castle Hill.

0830 - 1015 - Doors open to the congregation. Wedding guests start arriving in Middle Ward. Organ music plays in the Chapel.

From 1025 - Members of the royal family arrive at the Galilee Porch and are received by the Dean of Windsor.

1030 - Parents Mr and Mrs George Brooksbank, arrive at the West Door.

1032 - Sarah, Duchess of York and Princess Beatrice of York arrive by car at the West Door.

1035 - Groom Jack Brooksbank and his best man and brother Thomas Brooksbank arrive at the West Door.

1052 - The Queen arrives at the Galilee Porch and is received by the Dean and conducted to her seat in the Quire.

1057 - Bride Princess Eugenie and her father, the Duke of York, arrive at the West Steps of St George's Chapel

1200 - Service ends and the couple, the bridal party and the couple's parents process to the West Door.

The bride and groom depart from the West Steps by carriage.

1215 approx - Eugenie and Jack arrive at Windsor Castle for their afternoon reception.

Erdem is often Eugenie's go-to choice but Stella McCartney has also been hotly tipped.

Royal fans will be hoping for some fun-filled antics from the young helpers in the bridal party, who include George and Charlotte, Zara and Mike Tindall's spirited four-year-old Mia, and Peter and Autumn Phillips' mischievous daughters Savannah and Isla. 

But royal watchers will also be looking closely at Duke of Edinburgh, who hasn't acknowledged Eugenie's mother, Sarah, Duchess of York, for several decades.

Philip hasn't been able to forgive her for being photographed having her feet kissed by financial adviser John Bryan in 1992, which ultimately led to her divorce from his son.

But as the mother of the bride, Sarah has taken a major role in organising the wedding and will be centre stage, with the rest of the Royal Family, on the day.

Stars predicted to attend the second royal wedding of the year include singer Ellie Goulding, supermodel Cindy Crawford, Prince Harry's ex, actress Cressida Bonas, who is one of Eugenie's best friends, model Cara Delevingne, singer James Blunt and George and Amal Clooney, who also attended May's royal wedding.

The Queen is hosting an afternoon reception afterwards in the castle's St George's Hall, but the festivities will continue into the early hours with an evening party at the York family home.

The Royal Lodge in Windsor Great Park has had a fairground set up in the garden, complete with dodgems and a coconut shy.

Members of the public will have the chance to see the newlyweds in a carriage procession through Windsor town centre.

About 1,200 members of the public have also been given balloted invites to the castle's Lower Ward, as have charity representatives, children from Eugenie's old schools, and royal household staff.

Broadcast footage will be live streamed on The Royal Channel and the Duke of York's YouTube channels, and the royal family and Andrew's Facebook pages.

Republic, a campaigning group working for an elected head of state, has criticised the security cost to the taxpayer, saying estimates have put the bill at £2million. 

Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank have carried out their final rehearsals at St George's Chapel ahead of tomorrow's lavish royal wedding.

The Queen's granddaughter and her fiancé drove to the chapel in Windsor Castle this afternoon, less than 24 hours before they exchange their vows at the same venue where the Duke and Duchess of Sussex married in May.

They were followed by Eugenie's immediate family - her mother Sarah Ferguson, her father Prince Andrew and her sister and maid of honour, Princess Beatrice. 

The rehearsal for the wedding took place at 12pm today, MailOnline has learned, with royal guests in attendance including Prince George and Princess Charlotte who will be among the page boys and bridesmaids tomorrow. 

Princess Eugenie drives her fiancé Jack Brooksbank as the couple leave Windsor Castle a day ahead of their wedding

The bride-to-be beamed as she sat in the passenger seat of the car on their way in, driven by fiancé Jack Brooksbank

Sarah Ferguson and Prince Andrew, and their daughter Princess Beatrice pulled into the castle behind Jack and Eugenie 

The bride-to-be beamed as she sat in the passenger seat of the car on their way in, driven by her tequila ambassador fiancé, before driving the pair back out of Windsor Castle after the rehearsal. 

Princess Eugenie was followed by her parents Prince Andrew and the Duchess of York who, despite divorcing in 1996, remain on good terms. The couple still live together in Royal Lodge in Windsor Great Park, just three and a half miles from the castle. 

Jack and Eugenie will say their vows tomorrow before some 850 guests and members of the royal family including Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Queen.

Footage of the ceremony will be live streamed on The Royal Channel and The Duke of York's YouTube channels, as well as the royal family and Andrew's Facebook pages.

The wedding is also being screened in full on ITV as part of a special three-hour This Morning show live from Windsor, hosted by Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford.  

Eugenie and Jack's carriage journey will be a shorter affair than Harry and Meghan's, which followed a two-mile route and took around 25 minutes.

They will leave from the Royal Mews out of Windsor Castle and travel on to part of the High Street, before returning via Cambridge Gate, but they will not travel down the Long Walk like Eugenie's cousin and his bride.

It will follow the same route as the procession of Prince Edward and Sophie Wessex, who also married at St George's Chapel.

The couple may well decide to travel in the Ascot Landau, a smaller and lighter carriage than the State Landau with basket-work sides, which was the choice of Peter Phillips and Prince Edward and their brides for their St George's Chapel weddings.   

Eugenie was in the driver's seat as she and her husband-to-be Jack Brooksbank left Windsor Castle this afternoon 

The princess smiles as she and her fiancé Jack Brooksbank leave Windsor following their final wedding preparations today 

Prince Andrew in the driver's seat of his car at Windsor Castle during the final preparations for tomorrow's royal wedding 

Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank seen this afternoon at Windsor Castle a day ahead of their wedding

Sarah Ferguson and Prince Andrew leave Windsor Castle with their daughter Princess Beatrice on Thursday afternoon

Eugenie's sister Princess Beatrice, who is stepping into the role of maid of honour, was pictured in the back of another car pulling into the castle 

Princess Eugenie is seen in the passenger seat as her fiancé Jack Brooksbank drives her to Windsor Castle on Thursday 

The final page of the wedding service booklet, which will be handed to the 850 guests gathered in St George's Chapel, features an image of Here

Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank have added an unusual addition to their traditional Order of Service - a piece of modern art.

The final page of the wedding service booklet, which will be handed to the 850 guests gathered in St George's Chapel, features an image of Here, a mixed media on canvas from 2018 by American abstract artist Mark Bradford.

Another work by Bradford, Helter Skelter I, which used to belong to tennis star John McEnroe, sold for £8.7 million in March, the highest auction price achieved by a living African American artist.

Art-loving Eugenie is a director at the contemporary art gallery Hauser & Wirth in London.

Other personal touches by the couple include a reading from F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby, emblematic of the Jazz Age of the 1920s.

Princess Beatrice, Eugenie's older sister and maid of honour, will deliver the passage, which is a description of enigmatic Jay Gatsby's smile and said to capture both the theatrical quality of his character and his charisma.

The Order of Service also reveals that Jack will not be wearing a ring - unlike the Duke of Sussex - and Eugenie, like the Duchess of Sussex, will not promise to obey her husband.

Buckingham Palace said: 'Princess Eugenie and Mr Brooksbank have taken great care and interest in bringing together the content of their service, working closely with the Dean of Windsor and all others involved.

'The couple are looking forward to sharing their marriage ceremony with their family, friends and all those who have come to celebrate with them.'

A Gaelic Blessing will be sung by the choir, and Italian singer-songwriter Andrea Bocelli will perform Bach's Ave Maria.

The Order of Service also revealed Jack's unusual middle name, Stamp.

He will say: 'I Jack Christopher Stamp take thee Eugenie Victoria Helena to my wedded wife.'

Eugenie and Jack have, unlike Harry and Meghan, chosen a traditional, rather than a contemporary marriage service.

The 1928 Prayer Book Service features language such as 'thou' and 'thee' instead of 'you'.

It also refers to the bride and groom as 'Man' and 'Woman'.

The service reads: 'Eugenie wilt thou have this Man to thy wedded husband, to live together according to God's law in the holy estate of Matrimony? Wilt thou love him, comfort him, honour and keep him, in sickness and in health? and, forsaking all other, keep thee only unto him, so long as ye both shall live?

The choice of a traditional service was a personal preference for the couple.

Bocelli will also sing the tenor piece Panis Angelicus.

The bride will enter to the rousing organ recital of Bach's Piece d'Orgue.

The other reading is from the bible and will be read by Jack's paternal cousin Charles Brooksbank.

It is taken from St Paul's Letter to the Colossians Chapter 3.

Hymns include Glorious Things of Thee are Spoken, and Lord Divine All Loves Excelling.

The service will end with the National Anthem as is the tradition for royal weddings. 

A small but very dedicated crowd of royal wedding enthusiasts have descended on a rainy Windsor hours before Princess Eugenie exchanges vows with Jack Brooksbank.

The royal superfans are preparing to sleep rough outside Windsor Castle tonight to bag the best patch of pavement from which to catch a glimpse of the Queen's granddaughter at her lavish wedding tomorrow. 

Carrying sleeping bags and decorating the streets of Windsor with flags and balloons today, some of the well-wishers had travelled hundreds of miles to witness the wedding.

Undeterred by stringent security, the fans have been hanging bunting from shops and setting their banners up in anticipation of the couple's carriage procession.

Eugenie will marry tequila brand ambassador Jack Brooksbank in the Gothic surroundings of St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, where Prince Harry married Meghan Markle in May.

Some 850 guests will gather in the historic venue while 1,200 members of the public have been given balloted invites to the castle's Lower Ward, as have charity representatives, children from Eugenie's old schools, and royal household staff.

Police have stepped up security measures around the town and were seen today checking drains and patrolling with sniffer dogs.  

This keen fan was out early this morning putting up bunting and banners ahead of the big day on Friday 

Well-wishers and business owners are already blowing up balloons as they get set for the wedding and arrival of thousands of members of the public 

A small group of royal super-fans has descended on Windsor, sleeping rough outside the castle to bag the best patch of pavement for the wedding

Royal fan Joseph Afrane in place outside Windsor Castle ahead of the wedding. He said: 'I am here and my friends are here. We have our flags and that is what matters'

Bartley Graham, 30, a former civil servant, and his sister Sandra, 21, a factory worker, travelled all the way from County Durham for the big day.

They arrived last night and slept on the pavement in sleeping bags.

'People call us the crazy corner. They call us all sorts of things,' he said.

'We have been compared to the migrant camps in Calais. It gets a bit annoying after a while. But we just love the royals and are proud to be British.'

His sister, Sandra, added: 'We wouldn't be British if we didn't have the royals. It's enjoyable. We're not going to see many more of these events.'

Writer and career Kerry Evans, 54, travelled from Hull for the big day.

'It wasn't too cold overnight,' she said. 'We'd have liked to pitch a tent but we're not allowed, so we just had to sleep rough.

'We're not too tired, not with the adrenaline. We expected a big queue and are quite surprised that there's nobody else here.' 

Her friend, teacher Catherine Rohan, 61, added: 'We love all the royals. It doesn't matter whether they are A list or Z list.'

Windsor remained quiet overall today, with just two barriers around press areas as evidence of the festivities tomorrow.

Joseph Afrane, 55, from Battersea, was wearing a Union Jack suit, glasses and hat.

'Nobody is as committed to the cause as me,' he said. 'I don't care if the crowds aren't here yet. I am here and my friends are here. We have our flags and that is what matters.'   

Royal superfan Sky London, 58, is preparing to camp out on Windsor's streets overnight ahead of the carriage procession

A royal fan is interviewed by a TV crew in Windsor ahead of the wedding of Princess Eugenie to Jack Brooksbank

A royal well-wisher dressed in a British flag in Windsor today where royal wedding enthusiasts have gathered 

Let's get cracking! Baker Sophie Cabot, who's been commissioned to create Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank's wedding cake has released photos of herself creating the celebratory creation, which everyone from celebrities to A-listers will feast on

London-based cake designer Sophie Cabot has spent months conceiving the red velvet and chocolate cake, which is set to be the centrepiece of Princess Eugenie's wedding feast and inspired by their Kensington Palace cottage. 

New photos released two days before the couple marry at St George's Chapel in Windsor - in front of royals, the rich and the famous - show Cabot's masterpiece will reflect the changing seasons.

Cabot describes her culinary creation as 'special and unique', and promises it will feature rich, autumnal colours and detailed sugar work.

It's thought to have been inspired by the foliage surrounding Ivy Cottage, in the grounds of Kensington Palace, where the couple live together - a stone's throw from this year's other royal newlyweds, Meghan and Harry.  

The photos show Cabot knee-deep in industrial quantities of eggs, flour and caster sugar, with silk leaves in autumnal colours, berries and sugar-craft snowdrops carefully placed in boxes before adorning the cake.

The London-based star baker launched her business in 2014 and came to the attention of the couple after supplying specially-decorated biscuits to an event for the Duke of York's Pitch@Palace programme for entrepreneurs. 

The costume designer turned cake designer is seen painstakingly creating berries and sugarcraft flowers to go on the cake

That's a lot of eggs! The London-based baker is seen at work, with vital ingredients including eggs, caster sugar and a crucial bowl of red colouring seen before her

Delicate silk leaves in autumnal colours will adorn the cake, reflecting the changing seasons at Windsor Castle

They range from the cheekiest of little bridesmaids to a daughter of pop royalty.

The full bridal party for tomorrow's wedding of Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank was revealed by Buckingham Palace yesterday.

As well as adorable Mia Tindall, the bridesmaids at Windsor Castle will include singer Robbie Williams' daughter Teddy.

Princess Beatrice, pictured filming as an extra in Young Victoria at Lincoln Cathedral will be her elder sister's maid of honour during tomorrow's wedding in Windsor

Savannah Philips, Mia Tindall and Isla Philips, will be among the bridesmaids. Savannah and Isla are daughters of Peter Philips and his Canadian wife Autumn, while Mia is the daughter of Zara and Mike Tindall

Princess Charlotte, three, will be making her fourth appearance as a bridesmaid, having already made star turns at the weddings of her uncle, Prince Harry, auntie Pippa Middleton, and godmother, Sophie Carter. She is said to rule the roost back at the Cambridge family home. Her brother Prince George, five, is more wary of the cameras than his sister, but is also an old hand at weddings

'Love at first sight': Princess Eugenie opens up about husband-to-be

Seann Walsh speaks for the first time since the kiss scandal

Heartfelt moment dog reunites with owner after three years apart

'Crazy motherf*****' Kanye West praises 'hero' Donald Trump

Friends buy micro-apartment in same block with London Help to Buy

Drone footage over Florida town reveals staggering devastation

Arlene Foster says Theresa May must respect DUP 'red lines'

Groom's cake smash leaves his new bride completely floored

Aerial footage shows emergency services at scene of M4 collision

Kanye West heads to the Apple Store after the White House

Princess Eugenie and fiancé arrive for wedding rehearsal

Duke of Huescar and Sofia Palazuelo dance after getting married

Prince George, a wedding veteran at the age of only five, will be one of the page boys while little sister Princess Charlotte, three, will be a bridesmaid.

Their antics will be sure to pile the pressure on Princess Beatrice as she follows in the footsteps of the most famous royal wedding maid of honour – Pippa Middleton.

But royal insiders say that thanks to her 'fantastic' way with children, Beatrice, 30, will be able to keep the eight bridesmaids and pageboys in check.

As well as Mia, four, Teddy, six, and Charlotte, the bridesmaids are Savannah Phillips, seven, her sister Isla, six, and Maud Windsor, five.

Maud, pictured, is the daughter of Lord Freddie Windsor, son of Prince and Princess Michael of Kent 

Mia, daughter of Zara and Mike Tindall, is well known for her high-spirited antics. Her cousin, Savannah, is equally mischievous, and was spotted putting her mouth over Prince George's mouth on the balcony of Buckingham Palace during June's Trooping the Colour.

As the only non-royal, Teddy – short for Theodora – is an intriguing choice.

Her father and his actress partner Ayda Field, both judges on The X Factor, are good friends of Eugenie and her mother, Sarah, Duchess of York. Former Take That star Williams credits Teddy with helping prevent his life from spiralling into drug addiction.

Alongside George as page boy will be Louis de Givenchy, six, son of Olivier de Givenchy, managing director at JPMorgan Private Bank.

'Love at first sight': Princess Eugenie opens up about husband-to-be

Seann Walsh speaks for the first time since the kiss scandal

Heartfelt moment dog reunites with owner after three years apart

'Crazy motherf*****' Kanye West praises 'hero' Donald Trump

Friends buy micro-apartment in same block with London Help to Buy

Drone footage over Florida town reveals staggering devastation

Arlene Foster says Theresa May must respect DUP 'red lines'

Groom's cake smash leaves his new bride completely floored

Aerial footage shows emergency services at scene of M4 collision

Kanye West heads to the Apple Store after the White House

Princess Eugenie and fiancé arrive for wedding rehearsal

Duke of Huescar and Sofia Palazuelo dance after getting married

Tom Brooksbank, pictured, younger brother of groom Jack will be the best man

Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, 14, left, is the daughter of the Earl and Countess of Wessex and attends St George's School, Ascot. She was a bridesmaid for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. Gracious and well-mannered, she is a firm favourite of the Queen. Her brother James, Viscount Severn (right), ten, is considered shy but is said to be a 'delightful' boy in private. They are both the stewards 

And, in a charming touch, Eugenie and Mr Brooksbank have involved her uncle Prince Edward's children Lady Louise and James, Viscount Severn.

At 14 and ten, they are slightly too old to be a bridesmaid or page boy. But their role as 'special attendants' is a thoughtful way to involve them.

'It was a really sweet thing to do and I know the children and their parents are very touched,' a source said.

Mr Brooksbank, 32, has asked his younger brother Tom, 30, to be his best man. The ceremony will take place at 11am at St George's Chapel in front of up to 800 guests.

Most members of the Royal Family will be present, except the Duchess of Cornwall, who has declined citing a prior engagement in Scotland.

There have been suggestions that Prince Philip, 97, who has a notoriously fractious relationship with the Duchess of York, will 'see how he feels on the day'. But royal sources insisted last night that he will be there for his granddaughter's big day.  

Alexios Sheppard, 11, (left) and Leo Mills, 12, (right) both performed at the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's wedding and now will be centre stage for the nuptials of Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank

Young choristers who will sing at the royal wedding have described their excitement ahead of the big day.

Alexios Sheppard, 11, and Leo Mills, 12, both performed at the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's wedding and now will be centre stage for the nuptials of Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank.

It is the first time in living memory two royal weddings have been staged in the same year at Windsor Castle's St George's Chapel, so the two choristers will be part of an historic double.

The boys could not hide their joy, with Alexios saying: 'It's one of the best experiences we're ever going to have - it's just amazing.'

Leo added: 'I think it's really cool we get to sing at two royal weddings in one year. No one ever really gets to do that much - it's a very rare occasion so we're very lucky.'

Alexios joked: 'They call it a once-in-a-lifetime experience, but not for us.'

The pair, who attend St George's School at Windsor Castle, said they both enjoyed the experience of singing in St George's Chapel when Harry and Meghan married in May.

Alexios said about the earlier wedding: 'There was just this warm buzz going around the chapel - it just felt amazing and I feel this one is going to be as good as well.'

Leo added: 'It was a bit nerve-racking at the start but then when we got in I felt fine, it felt like a normal service, with added bits.' 

The Duchess of Cornwall will host a shooting party for her friends in Scotland and will not attend Princess Eugenie's wedding tomorrow. 

Camilla today joined in a cookery class at a school in Scotland, helping youngsters at Alford Community Campus in Aberdeenshire mark their Harvest Festival.

Camilla, who is also the Duchess of Rothesay, got stuck in as youngsters at Alford Community Campus in Aberdeenshire took part in a cookery class and school performance to mark Harvest Festival.

Tomorrow she will visit Crathie primary school near Balmoral before hosting friends for a party at her Scottish home, which means she will be unable to attend Eugenie's wedding to Jack Brooksbank. 

Camilla the Duchess of Cornwall and Rothesay in Scotland is pictured outside Alford Community Campus in Aberdeenshire where she joined pupils taking part in a cooking class during her trip to Scotland that will see her miss the royal wedding 

The Duchess visited Alford Community Campus today ahead of her visit to Crathie Primary School near Balmoral tomorrow. Her engagement on Friday means she will miss out on Princess Eugenie's wedding to wine merchant Jack Brooksbank

All smiles: The Duchess of Cornwall is pictured with staff at Alford Community Campus in Aberdeenshire on Thursday 

Her husband Prince Charles will witness the couple getting married and join her in Scotland after the festivities.  

But her friends were reportedly puzzled why she had chosen this weekend to plan the party when the date of the wedding has been known for eight months.

A source close to Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank denied there was a rift, saying there was 'no issue' and that the couple had 'known about the diary clash for some time'. 

There have been rumours of a rift between the branches of the royal family dating back to the Duchess of York's friendship with Princess Diana.  

Today Camilla was pictured beaming with students at Alford Community Campus, which was officially opened in November 2015 and caters for pupils in early years, primary and secondary education.

The campus features a library, theatre, dance studio, sports hall, gym, community rooms and a swimming pool and is well used by the local community.   

What's cooking? Camilla, who is also the Duchess of Rothesay in Scotland, is pictured asking two pupils at Alford Community Campus what they are making for their cookery class to celebrate the Harvest Festival 

Princess Eugenie (HRH): It's definitely creeping up on us now, the nerves.

Jack Brooksbank (JB): We were skiing in a friend's place out in Switzerland, and [looking at Eugenie] I saw you first, didn't I?

HRH: Yes, and I thought, 'what a silly hat!' [laughs] ...and I thought, 'who's that?' and then [looking at Jack] you came over and shook my hand and I was all butterflies and nervous. I think I rang my mum that night and said 'I've met this guy Jack'... and that was it I think about how it started. I remember being like 'I really, really like this guy, I really want him to like me too' and then you gave me this huge windscreen wiper wave and that was it, right, he likes me.

EH: How would you describe each other in three words?

HRH: Jack's the kind of guy, you know when you're lost at a party and you can't find anyone to talk to, and you start panicking and you need help? He'll walk in and make everyone feel so special. He'll scoop you up and talk to you and make you feel a million dollars and [looks at Jack] that's you, and you're so humble and generous. So humble and generous - that's two words - and that person you immediately know [that] you've got a friend…

RL: [talking to Jack]: You're going to have your brother Tom as your Best Man, and [talking to Eugenie] you're going to have your sister Beatrice by your side as your Maid of Honour. How important it is for you both to have them there?

JB: It was so nice that we both chose our siblings.

HRH: Who are very good friends actually, separately to Jack and I, which is nice. But my sister has always - she's my big sissy - I've looked up to her my whole life. I've wanted to be her at times, we've fought over Converse trainers and who gets what… and you know, we're best friends and I can't think of anyone I'd want by my side more than her. She's the biggest supporter of 'Team Eug and Jack' and so it's a great honour for me that she said 'yes' and she's doing that duty. And then Tom…

JB: Yes, there was no other decision. [He's] a solid rock, he's amazing.

RL: You're the patron of many charities actually, how many people have you invited from your charities and how important is it for you that they are here?

HRH: It's very important. The RNOH is a huge charity - the Royal National Orthopedic Hospital - I'm patron of their appeal and I had an operation when I was 12 on my back, and you'll see on Friday, but it's a lovely way to honour the people who looked after me and a way of standing up for young people who also go through this. I think you can change the way beauty is, and you can show people your scars and I think it's really special to stand up for that. So that's one really important one. But seperate to that, other organisations that are there, it's just very important that they get a chance to be honoured for the work that they do constantly, so it's lovely that I can share this special day with them.

RL: How do you think you're going to feel walking down the aisle with your father by your side, what do you think will be going through your head at that point?

HRH: It's nerve-wracking and a bit scary and all the things that come with getting married, but at the end of the day you get to marry the person you love… [looking at Jack] and you're going to be at the end of the aisle, and I'm going to be running towards you! [Laughing]

HRH: No, [but] I've told my dad if he goes fast, that's it, we are not talking anymore! So he's going to go really slowly I hope.

EH: In the preparation for the wedding, was there ever any evidence that Eugenie turned into a Bridezilla?

JB: [Smiling] Well I've got two days left until…. No, I'm joking, there wasn't a Bridezilla. Eugenie has been amazing. She's been incredible, she has the ability to do a million things at once in her brain, including working as well as organising everything to do with the wedding.

EH: Andrea Bocelli with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra will be in the Chapel, in the church itself… Wow!

HRH: Andrea Bocelli and his wife Veronica are very good friends with my mum and they did a lot of charity work together, including working on his foundation, so welcoming a friend to come and sing was just an amazing opportunity and I'm so happy that he said 'yes' and he's coming with his family.

EH: That bit we know, what about the entertainment at the reception, is that secret?

HRH: Well we [looking at Jack] were maybe going to sing, weren't we? [Laughs]

JB: I actually thought you were being serious! I was thinking 'what are we singing?'

RL: And how is your dancing, have you planned a routine or are you just going to see what happens on the day?

JB: You're a very good dancer, I'm a very bad dancer!

RL: We've been together for 22 years, married, [is there] any advice you might like from an old married couple?

EH: Anything you'd like to ask us? Anything we could impart to you that would make your journey easier from here on in?

HRH: Oh gosh. What is it like working together and being married?

EH: If I could just say, in general, I think the secret to a long and happy marriage is never have a cross word between you… never, be like us, never a cross word!

EH: But do you know what, you are very good together the two of you and may you live happily ever after. It's been an absolute pleasure. Congratulations.

EH: As you go by in that carriage, we are just in the studio behind.

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October 12, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

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    1 November 17, 2018

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