NHS bosses admit 'failings in care' led to the death of a newborn premature baby in Stoke

Grieving parents Daniel and Nicola Rushton-Walley, from Stoke-on-Trent, were still grieving loss of their newborn son Kole when brother, Masen, passed away. 

An NHS investigation found that while nothing could've been done to prevent the death of Kole, there was several errors made in caring for Masen.

Masen suffocated after his endotracheal tube - used to assist in breathing - became dislodged and went unnoticed by hospital staff. 

Newborn Masen Rushton-Walley (pictured) died after his breathing tube became dislodged and went unnoticed by nurses

The boys were born prematurely at 28 weeks at the Royal Stoke University Hospital in May, 2016.

Kole and passed away just six hours after birth from constant high blood pressure.

Four days after his birth, Masen was transferred to Manchester's St Mary's Hospital with a suspected bowel infection.

He underwent successful surgery a day later and was in a stable condition.

Four days after his birth, Masen had successful surgery for a suspected bowel infection. He was in stable condition but needed an endotracheal tube to help him breathe

But three days later his endotracheal tube became partially dislodged and went unnoticed by a student nurse. 

It later became completely dislodged and meant Masen became starved of oxygen. His heart rate dropped and he died 50 minutes later.

Now the family are preparing to attend an inquest into Masen's death later this year as they work to make sure lessons have been learned from the tragedy.

They have bravely spoken out for Baby LossAwareness Week which runs until Monday.  

Mrs Rushton-Walley, 30, said: 'We are still coming to terms with losing Masen and Kole, but I hope that if any good can come from our loss, it will be that lessons will be learned and that I can help other families.

'No parents should have to go through what Daniel and I have gone through.

'The pain is excruciating and not a day goes by where I don't think about how if things had been done differently, Masen would still be with us now.

Grieving parents Daniel and Nicola Rushton-Walley (pictured with daughters Aaliyah, 13, and Keira, 7) said they want lessons to be learned from their case to ensure it never happens to another family

'We truly hope more can be done to improve care standards so other families do not face the nightmare we have been through.'

She added: 'We understood with Kole because he was poorly but with Masen we didn't understand and the second it happened at the hospital in Manchester I knew something was wrong straight away and I expressed that.

'I was worried they had made mistakes and it hurts more because he would still be here if it wasn't for errors on their side.

'It killed us taking down the nursery and the cots. It's more painful because we know he would have been here if it wasn't for St Mary's Hospital.'

The couple have two daughters, 13-year-old Aaliyah and seven-year-old Keira. They are supporting Waves of Light events which are being staged around the world as part of the awareness week. It will see candles lit for at least an hour.

Mr Rushton-Walley said: 'While we know that it's important to focus on the future, events like this help us remember Kole and Masen. It enables us to keep them close.'

Mrs Rushton-Walley said: 'It killed us taking down the nursery and the cots. It's more painful because we know he would have been here if it wasn't for St Mary's Hospital'

The couple called in specialist lawyers from legal firm Irwin Mitchell following Masen's death.

Solicitor Emma Wagstaff said: 'This is a truly heart-breaking incident, in which a couple have gone through something which simply no parent should have to face. While we accept that nothing could be done to prevent Kole's death, the care Masen received was unacceptable.

'More than two years on Nicola and Daniel are still working to come to terms with their loss. While admissions of liability have been made in the case, we are now focused on ensuring they get the justice they deserve regarding Masen's death.'

 The couple have bravely spoken out for Baby LossAwareness Week which runs until Monday

Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust has brought in a number of changes to make sure lessons are learned following Mason's death.

In a letter to the family, trust chief executive Sir Michael Deegan said: 'On behalf of the trust, I would like to express my sincere apologies fo the delay in the removal of the endotracheal tube and the consequent failure of attempts to resuscitate baby Masen. 

'We are committed to ensuring that lessons are learnt to improve care and try to avoid such failing occurring in the future. Once  gain, I offer my heartfelt apologies and condolences for your loss.'

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October 12, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

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    Labour shadow cabinet minister Barry Gardiner and Green MP Caroline Lucas as they set out rival visions for the way ahead- almost 900 days after the country voted to leave.</p><p>The four speakers made opening and closing statements in front of a live studio audience, with Ms Lucas sharing her support for a People's Vote and Mr Rees-Mogg making the case for a complete break away from the EU.</p><p>The show, saw Tory MP James Cleverly (left), Labour MP Barry Gardiner (second left), Tory MP Jacob Rees-Mogg (second from right) and Green MP Caroline Lucas (right) discuss their positions on the Prime Minister's deal</p><p>Arch- Brexiteer and Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg said Theresa May as not living by her policies  and called it a 'losers' vote'</p><p>During the debate Mogg said: 'Everybody agreed to accept the result of the referendum. Now Theresa May has said one thing and come back with a deal that does another'</p><p>Tory deputy chairman James Cleverly made the plea in support of Theresa May's deal and said it was what the people voted for</p><p>Labour MP Barry Gardiner  said Mrs May had 'brought back a deal that even her closest allies think would damage the UK'</p><p>The Real Brexit Debate was aired on Channel 4 after rival plans by the BBC and ITV for a televised showdown involving Mrs May and Jeremy Corbyn fell through.</p><p>The first audience member to speak called Mrs May's Brexit deal 'treasonous', while the last quoted 'the great philosopher Kylie Minogue' as he called for another referendum, with the reasoning 'better the devil you know'.</p><p>Mr Cleverly said: 'Our deal delivers on what people voted for. It takes back control of our money, our borders, our laws.</p><p>'It means we can get on with Brexit and give more time to focus on other important issues like the NHS.'</p><p>He added: 'The only thing we know for sure is that rejecting this deal means damaging uncertainty and, as a Brexiteer, the thing that worries me the most is the risk we do not leave the EU at all.'</p><p>The shadow international trade secretary Mr Gardiner said: 'People voted to leave, but they voted for a better future'</p><p>However the Labour MP was opposed by Caroline Lucas who argues Labour's position was 'fantasy land'</p><p>Mt Gardiner said the Labour government would negotiate a permanent customs union, a strong single market deal that protects workers' rights and environmental standards</p><p>The Real Brexit Debate was aired after rival plans by the BBC and ITV for a televised showdown involving Mrs May and Jeremy Corbyn fell through</p><p>But Brexiteer Mr Rees-Mogg, who opposes the deal, said: 'This is all about trust.</p><p>'Across Europe politicians are distrusted - there are riots in France and troubles in Italy.</p><p>'Everybody agreed to accept the result of the referendum. Now Theresa May has said one thing and come back with a deal that does another.'</p><p>Shadow international trade secretary Mr Gardiner said Mrs May had 'brought back a deal that even her closest allies think would damage the UK'.</p><p>On Twitter it was Caroline Lucas who seemed to win the votes of many viewers </p><p>'Labour would negotiate a permanent customs union, a strong single market deal that protects workers' rights and environmental standards,' he said.</p><p>'People voted to leave, but they voted for a better future.'</p><p>Ms Lucas said Labour's position was 'fantasy land' and argued: 'This decision can't be left to the politicians, we simply can't agree.'</p><p>She said viewers would be 'screaming at the television in despair' at the MPs.</p><p>'We are going to have to live with the consequences of this decision for decades to come and it will affect young people most of all,' she said.</p><p>'So let's just be sure: let's vote on this together as a country, don't leave it to the Westminster elite to decide for you.'</p><p>Mr Rees-Mogg called it a 'losers' vote' and asked: 'If you get a second vote and lose that, how long will it be before you ask for the third?'</p><p>But Ms Lucas shot back that in 2011 Mr Rees-Mogg had suggested 'it might make more sense to have the second referendum after the renegotiation is completed' - comments made in reference to David Cameron's renegotiation with Brussels.</p><p>On Twitter it was Caroline Lucas who seemed to have won the votes of many.</p><p>One user wrote: 'Caroline Lucas is the only grown up in the room.'</p><p>Another user commented: 'Despite being a Labour voter Caroline Lucas was the only person here that made sense. She did not force her viewpoint and went into facts.' </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 10, 2018
  • Queen's former driver admits to sexually abusing boys in his Buckingham Palace quarters

    Queen's former driver admits to sexually abusing boys in his Buckingham Palace quarters

    kingham Palace quarters and another young boy at a relative’s home, but died before he could be charged, it was reported last night.</p><p>Alwyn Stockdale, 81, reportedly admitted attacking a ten-year-old boy and a boy aged under 14 in the 1970s. Stockdale, who was retired, died of natural causes in hospital last week, but was due to be charged with indecently assaulting one of the boys and with three offences of gross indecency on the second youngster, according to The Sun.</p><p>The newspaper claims prosecutors had told police to charge Stockdale with the offences.</p><p>Alwyn Stockdale, 81, was a driver for the Queen and sexually abused a boy in his Buckingham Palace quarters</p><p>An alleged victim, a man now in his 50s, reportedly told police he had been assaulted when he was ten, with detectives allegedly taking 19 months to track Stockdale down.</p><p>Stockdale is said to have lived in Royal Household quarters at Buckingham Palace Mews at the time and later lived in a cottage on the Windsor estate.</p><p>He allegedly attacked one of the boys at the West Yorkshire home of a relative, who was also a royal servant, but who was unaware of the alleged crime.</p><p>A source told The Sun: ‘The victims are understandably upset that Stockdale will not face justice. They’ve lived with what he did all their adult lives.’</p><p>‘There are questions over why it took so long for police to identify and get round to questioning Stockdale.</p><p> Stockdale is believed to have lived in Royal Household quarters at Buckingham Palace Mews while serving as a chauffeur to the Queen</p><p>‘Given his age, it was a race against time to bring him to justice.</p><p>‘But like Jimmy Savile and the MP Cyril Smith, he died before that could happen.’</p><p>The Metropolitan Police said it is aware of the newspaper report, but was unable to comment at that time.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 10, 2018
  • Body is found by police hunting for 19-year-old who vanished from Inverness two weeks ago 

    Body is found by police hunting for 19-year-old who vanished from Inverness two weeks ago 

    ka with a fluffy hood on November 28 in Leachkin, Inverness</p><p>A body has been found in the search for a 19-year-old girl who went missing two weeks ago. </p><p>Jade McGrath was last seen in the Leachkin area of Inverness on November 28.</p><p>After a large-scale search involving police dogs, the RAF and specialist officers, police confirmed that a body was found in Inverness, Scotland, at around 3pm this afternoon.</p><p>The 19-year-old is from Aviemore and her family has been informed of Sunday's discovery.</p><p>A police statement said: 'Police Scotland can confirm they have recovered a body from Lawers Way, Inverness at about 3pm on Sunday.</p><p>The family said in a statement released by Police Scotland: 'As each day goes on, we are growing increasingly concerned for Jade and we just desperately want answers and to know where she is.</p><p>'Anyone who was in the Leachkin area last Wednesday afternoon from around 1.45pm, please think back and if you think you might have seen anything please call the police.</p><p>The teenager (pictured) has a diamond tattoo on her hand and has been missing since November 28</p><p>'She had no phone or money with her and she would most likely have been in a distressed state if you saw her.</p><p>'We are grateful to everyone who has helped so far and are just desperate for news.</p><p>'If Jade is reading this, we want you to know that we love you very much and we just want you home safe.'</p><p>Jade is around 5ft 2in and petite, with long, bleached blonde hair with dark roots and faint wisps of blue in the ends.</p><p>She was wearing a khaki green parka-style jacket with a fluffy hood, black leggings and Nike trainers.</p><p>The teenager has an Alice In Wonderland tattoo on one of her forearms, with diamond and club symbols from a pack of cards on her fingers and a small diamond tattoo on her hand.</p><p>Police officers investigating the missing girl found the body at Lawers Way, Inverness (pictured)</p><p>Police in Inverness recovered a body on Sunday during the search for teenager Jade McGrath</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 10, 2018
  • Travel chaos expected as train companies introduce new timetable today

    Travel chaos expected as train companies introduce new timetable today

    tion following the launch of the latest new timetable.</p><p>The last time major changes were made, in May, commuters were left stranded as thousands of services were delayed or cancelled.</p><p>And although network bosses stressed they had planned fewer changes this time around, they warned there could still be 'pockets of disruption'.</p><p>Worst-hit in May were 8,000 Thameslink and Great Northern services - run by Govia Thameslink Railway - and 5,000 run by Northern, which were cancelled or severely delayed. </p><p>Both companies could face fines in the New Year following an investigation into whether they breached their operating licences.</p><p>Rail passengers are bracing themselves for delays this morning after train companies introduced another new timetable yesterday. File image of chaos at St Pancras Station used</p><p>The fiasco led to the introduction of emergency timetable services in which trains were cancelled or replaced by buses for weeks on end.</p><p>In one case, trains were delayed by a lack of drivers qualified to take them through a newly-built tunnel in North London.</p><p>The winter timetable was officially launched yesterday without incident but today is the first weekday the revamped service will be used by millions of commuters.</p><p>Anthony Smith, chief executive of passenger watchdog Transport Focus, said: 'This time around passengers expect the rail industry to drive a smooth set of timetable improvements.</p><p>'Passengers paid a hefty price for the catalogue of over optimism, missed deadlines and blurred accountability that led to a summer of timetable crisis and ensuing chaos.</p><p>'To regain their trust, passengers need to see that lessons have been learned.</p><p>'Looking forward, someone must be placed clearly in charge of major timetable changes in future, to ensure robust oversight and with the power to hit the stop button when something is not going to work.'</p><p>The Rail Delivery Group, which represents train operating companies, said changes for the winter timetable have been 'smaller than those seen earlier this year' to minimise the risk of problems.</p><p>When timetable changes came in in May the worst-hit were 8,000 Thameslink (pictured) and Great Northern services - run by Govia Thameslink Railway - and 5,000 run by Northern, which were cancelled or severely delayed</p><p>Improvements include the introduction of 200 additional weekday services on Thameslink and Great Northern.</p><p>But Northern, which has had up to 10 per cent of its trains out of action due to wheel damage caused by leaves on the line, admitted its service would still not be up to scratch.</p><p>Hundreds of the company's trains have had fewer carriages than usual, causing sometimes severe overcrowding, and it said the problems could 'last until at least next May'.</p><p>In the month to November 11, 1,162 of Northern's trains lacked the normal number of carriages and some were axed altogether.</p><p>Later last month, services on the Preston to Ormskirk line in Lancashire were cancelled for an entire week.</p><p>Raj Chandarana, stakeholder manager for Northern, told a public meeting in Manchester that May's timetable crisis had led to a 'horrendous' shortage of trains - worsened by the wheel damage issue.</p><p>The last time major changes were made, in May, commuters were left stranded as thousands of services were delayed or cancelled. File image of delayed passengers at London Waterloo used</p><p>He said: 'We are doing what we can but in reality until the infrastructure improvements happen we are not able to use the trains that are fit for purpose on electrified tracks and it won't be until May next year at the earliest that we'll be in a position to say at peak there won't be short-formed trains.'</p><p>Northern blamed Network Rail for delays on electrification projects on major lines, which meant diesel trains on those routes could still not be released for use elsewhere.</p><p>Mr Chandarana said: 'We've tried to plug the gap with existing stock and by borrowing trains from other operators.' </p><p>'The situation we face is one that is hugely regrettable.' Greater Manchester authorities estimate a 5 per cent rise in traffic coming into the city has been generated by the rail disruption, which also includes Northern guards striking every Saturday.</p><p>Robert Nisbet, regional director of the Rail Delivery Group, admitted there could be 'some pockets of disruption' on the network today and urged passengers to check the new timetables before they travel.</p><p>It comes after a report into May's timetable chaos by Professor Stephen Glaister, chairman of watchdog body the Office for Rail and Road, warned train companies had a battle to restore 'trust and confidence'.</p><p>Mr Nisbet said: 'Over the next few years, we are committed to delivering a step change in the quality and reliability of rail services through huge investment in infrastructure so that thousands of extra services can run.</p><p>'We know that people in some areas might be concerned about another timetable change but as the Glaister Review acknowledges the rail industry has worked together to start learning the lessons from May.</p><p>'As with the introduction of any new timetable, there may be some pockets of disruption as people get used to new journeys and train times, so we advise people to check before travelling.'</p><p>He added that improvements over the next three years would include introduction of 7,000 new carriages and hundreds of fully refurbished trains, supporting 6,400 extra services a week by 2021.</p><p>Sir Peter Hendy, chairman of Network Rail, said: 'The railway industry (took) a long hard look at its plans for the timetable change in December and, taking into account recent painful lessons, the industry has scaled back its ambition and tempered it with a more cautious, phased approach.</p><p>'The railway is too vital for the health and wealth of our country to risk a repeat of the mistakes of May and this more balanced approach of ambition and caution is absolutely the right thing to do for the millions who rely on our railway every day.' </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 10, 2018
  • Britons will save £2.85 on filling up their cars after petrol prices fall by 5p a litre

    Britons will save £2.85 on filling up their cars after petrol prices fall by 5p a litre

    op in nearly four years, the latest figures show.</p><p>The average cost of unleaded is back to mid-May levels of about 130.61p a litre after dropping 5.18p in November, while diesel fell by 2.5p to 134.42p.</p><p>This equates to a saving of £2.85 on a typical family-sized car’s tank of unleaded fuel.</p><p>The price of petrol fell 5p a litre last month. The average cost of unleaded is back to mid-May levels of about 130.61p a litre [File photo]</p><p>Oil prices have fallen by 24 per cent on the world market while, in the UK, supermarket price wars have also contributed to price cuts, said an RAC report.</p><p>Petrol prices are still up to 10p a litre higher than they should be as not all the savings have yet been passed on to drivers.</p><p>Simon Williams, of the RAC, said: ‘This should have translated to the average price of petrol being about 120p a litre but retailers chose not to pass on the savings, meaning the current average still remains unnecessarily high at 125.43p.</p><p>‘Petrol still ought to come down by 7p a litre in the next two weeks and diesel by 5p.’</p><p>He added: ‘We can only hope they are planning some cuts in the run-up to Christmas with a view to getting more shoppers into their stores.’</p><p>Petrol prices fell 5p a litre last month – the biggest drop in nearly four years, the latest figures show [File photo]</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 10, 2018
  • Final words of murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi are revealed in transcript

    Final words of murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi are revealed in transcript

    of journalist Jamal Khahsoggi as he was brutally killed at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in October. </p><p>A source, who read a translated transcript of the recording, said that the journalist repeated several times 'I can't breathe' moments before his death.</p><p>The recording also captured the horrific sounds of Khashoggi's body being dismembered with a saw - while his alleged killers were told to listen to music to block out the noise.  </p><p>The shocking recording has thrown even more doubt on Saudi claims that the killing was a botched rendition attempt and not an execution.  </p><p>Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi repeatedly told his captors he couldn't breathe as he was killed in October</p><p>Khashoggi can be heard struggling against his captors - who make a series of phone calls during his torture. </p><p>The calls suggest that the killers were keeping higher-ups updated with their butchering of the journalist. </p><p>Turkish officials claim the calls were made to senior figures in Riyadh. </p><p>It was supposed to be a routine appointment, but the journalist was then confronted by a man he recognised and did not expect to be at the consulate.</p><p>Khashoggi can be heard asking the man what he is doing there. </p><p>According to CNN, the man is Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb, a former Saudi diplomat and intelligence official working for Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and known to Khashoggi from their time together at the Saudi Embassy in London.</p><p>He can be heard telling Khashoggi: 'You are coming back'.</p><p>The recording also captured the horrific sounds of Khashoggi's body being dismembered with a saw at the consulate</p><p>The journalist can be heard arguing back and saying that there are people waiting for him outside. </p><p>He is believed to have told his waiting fiancee to call associates if he didn't return.  </p><p>Khashoggi is then set on by a several people, according to the transcript.  </p><p>Despite Saudi officials suggesting he was accidentally choked to death, the journalist can be heard repeating: 'I can't breathe.' </p><p>The transcript notes that Khashoggi screams and gasps before dying and his body is then sawed.  </p><p>The only other person named in the transcript is Dr Salah Muhammad al-Tubaiqi, the head of forensic medicine at Saudi Arabia's Interior Ministry </p><p>Tubaiqi can be heard advising people to listen to music as they dismember the dead journalist.  </p><p> Mutreb, who is updating someone throughout, then says: 'Tell yours, the thing is done, it's done.' </p><p>According to CNN, the transcript has been circulated to Turkish and Saudi allies, including those in Europe, but only the United States and Saudi Arabia have received the recording itself.  </p><p>The office of one US senator, who has received a briefing on the investigation by CIA Director Gina Haspel, told CNN that the source's recollections of the transcript are 'consistent' with that briefing. </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 10, 2018

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